Navigation Links
MU researchers believe discovery could lead to testing that displaces colonoscopies
Date:2/16/2011

COLUMBIA, Mo. Nobody enjoys colonoscopies, including mice. University of Missouri researchers are excited about the potential of using genetic biomarkers to predict colon cancer caused by inflammation. A new method developed at the MU Research Animal Diagnostic Laboratory (RADIL) could eventually lead to a method that might eliminate colonoscopies altogether.

While working to develop novel therapeutics for colon cancer, Craig Franklin, associate professor of veterinary pathobiology in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine; Aaron Ericsson, post-doctoral researcher at MU; Mike Lewis, assistant professor of veterinary medicine and surgery; Matt Myles, assistant professor of veterinary pathobiology and Lillian Maggio-Price, professor of comparative medicine at the University of Washington, found biomarkers in mouse feces that predicted inflammation-associated colon cancer. This is the same type of cancer associated with some common inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease.

The team found that the bacterium that leads to inflammation-associated colon cancer in mice first results in inflammation that can be detected by screening feces for messenger RNA of genes. Franklin believes this discovery could lead to tests for similar genes that are present in humans with early inflammation associated colon cancer.

The study was published recently in Neoplasia, which also featured the study on the journal's cover.

"The assumption was that the gene expression couldn't be detected in fecal matter because RNA breaks down very rapidly. Historically, this was something that a lot of scientists, including us, hadn't considered," Franklin said. "But technology has evolved, and we now have the means of preserving RNA much better than we did 15 years ago."

As a laboratory animal veterinarian, Franklin believes this discovery also could decrease the number of animals used in research.

"We're excited about the potential for application in humans, but this also will decrease animal numbers, which is one of our goals," Franklin said. "This test determines which mice will get cancer in advance, so we won't need to have as many animals in an experimental group to achieve statistical significance."

"There's also no stress on the animal for us to test their fecal matter," Ericsson said. "Many people put off colonoscopies longer than they should because of the invasiveness and unpleasant nature of the exam, and it's not pleasant for mice either. That unpleasantness is negated with this test."

For this study, the team also used a high-powered MRI machine located in the Department of Veterans Affairs facility located at the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital. While effective, this technique was not as sensitive as the fecal biomarkers in predicting cancer, and it requires extensive expertise and very expensive equipment. Franklin credits the success of the project to a multidisciplinary team that included Wade Davis, assistant professor of biostatistics; Lixin Ma, assistant professor of radiology, and a multitude of veterinarians.

"It was a large collaboration, and veterinarians are ideal for collaborative medicine because we know the animal model," Franklin said. "There are several angles that converge here, and we're now interested in finding collaborators in human medicine that would like to explore this further. Ultimately, I'd envision panels of tests that predict diseases, with this method in the mix."


'/>"/>

Contact: Steven Adams
AdamsST@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers link gene mutations to Ebsteins anomaly
2. UT researchers link algae to harmful estrogen-like compound in water
3. Ben-Gurion U. researchers develop techniques to manipulate plant adaption in arid climates
4. Jefferson researchers provide genetic evidence that antioxidants can help treat cancer
5. Researchers working toward automating sedation in intensive care units
6. Boston University School of Medicine researchers receive NIMH brain awards
7. Just in time for Valentines Day: UNC researchers identify a gene critical for heart function
8. Johns Hopkins researchers capture jumping genes
9. The brain knows what the nose smells, but how? Stanford researchers trace the answer
10. Cornell researchers find a strong community protects adolescents from risky health behavior
11. First new C. difficile drug in a generation superior to existing treatments: Researchers
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/14/2016)... , March 14, 2016 NXTD ... growing mobile commerce market, announces the airing of a new ... starting the week of March 21 st .  The commercials ... including its popular Squawk on the Street show. --> ... on the growing mobile commerce market, announces the airing of ...
(Date:3/11/2016)... , March 11, 2016 ... new market research report "Image Recognition Market by Technology ... (Marketing and Advertising), by Deployment Type (On-Premises and Cloud), ... To 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global market is ... to USD 29.98 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR ...
(Date:3/9/2016)... -- This BCC Research report provides an overview of ... (RNA Seq) market for the years 2015, 2016 and ... data analysis, and services. Use this report ... such as RNA-Sequencing tools and reagents, RNA-Sequencing data analysis, ... segment and forecast their market growth, future trends and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/4/2016)...  Bayer today announced that a Phase III ... (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with ... endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall ... and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC ... The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with ...
(Date:5/4/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 04, 2016 , ... ... recent innovations in biotechnology to help treat hormonal and stress related hair loss. ... has captured the hearts of key opinion leaders in the medical and salon ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... at Boston CEO 2016 on May 31st and June 1st at The Four ... for leading executives in the life sciences, offering exclusive access to key decision ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... 2016 - And Other Rising ... of Those Competitor Biologics  - Biosimilar Drug ... Prospects ,  Who are the most important ... are their sales potentials? Discover, in our updated survey, ... opportunities and revenue forecasting. Visiongain,s ...
Breaking Biology Technology: