Navigation Links
MSU researcher: Obesity significantly cuts odds of successful pregnancy
Date:11/3/2009

EAST LANSING, Mich. Obese women are as much as 28 percent less likely to become pregnant and have a successful pregnancy, according to research that earned a Michigan State University professor a national award.

The findings by Barbara Luke, a researcher in the MSU College of Human Medicine's Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, focused on data of nearly 50,000 women using assisted reproductive technology.

Luke's findings, which also can be applied to women not using assisted technology, showed women who are simply overweight have a 14 percent less chance of a successful pregnancy.

"The results are not surprising; obesity is a state of inflammation and is not a good environment for conception or fetal development," Luke said. "The key message is to lose weight, prior to conception, and focus on pre-conception health issues.

"Once you become pregnant, the baby is developing in that environment."

Last month Luke was awarded the 2009 Scientific Program Prize Paper for her presentation on maternal obesity research at the 2009 American Society of Reproductive Medicine international meeting in Atlanta. More than 5,000 experts from around the world attended the meeting, which featured nearly 900 abstracts. Only two were selected as program prize papers.

As part of the research, Luke's team looked at the effect increasing body mass index had on a woman's ability to become pregnant using assisted reproductive technology and how obesity affects pregnancy outcomes. They compared outcomes to women with normal body mass index (BMI of 18.5-24.9). Women were classified as overweight (BMI of 25 to 29.9), Class 1 obesity (30-34.9), Class 2 (35-39.9) and Class 3 (40 or greater).

Among the findings:

  • Women at Class 3 obesity were 35 percent less likely to become pregnant; Class 2 resulted in a 28 percent less chance; 9 percent for Class 1; and 3 percent for overweight women.
  • Of the obese women who were able to become pregnant, the odds of stillbirth were increased more than twofold.
  • Among live births, the odds of premature birth significantly paralleled increasing obesity: from 16 percent for overweight women to 34 percent for women at Class 3.

"If you are thinking about starting a family, get into the best physical shape possible." Luke said. "Control the factors you can such as drinking alcohol and smoking and remember, body weight is just as important."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jason Cody
codyja@msu.edu
517-432-0924
Michigan State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. URI researcher: China cant fully fix air quality problem for Olympics
2. Researcher: Lasers used to detect melamine in baby formula
3. Childhood obesity indicates greater risk of school absenteeism, Penn study reveals
4. Obesity and lack of exercise could enhance the risk of pancreatic cancer
5. Obesity and the central nervous system -- the state of the art
6. Obesity-related hormone is higher in children with Down syndrome
7. Australian researchers develop treatment to treat obesity
8. Study suggests link between obesity, poor bone health
9. BMI criteria for obesity surgery should be lowered, UT Southwestern researcher suggests
10. Overeating and obesity triggered by lack of BDNF
11. Human hormone blocker found to help prevent obesity and diabetes: study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/19/2016)... 2016 The new GEZE SecuLogic ... web-based "all-in-one" system solution for all door components. It ... the door interface with integration authorization management system, and ... The minimal dimensions of the access control and the ... installations offer considerable freedom of design with regard to ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... BioCatch ™, the global ... the appointment of Eyal Goldwerger as CEO. ... Goldwerger,s leadership appointment comes at a time of significant ... of its platform at several of the world,s largest ... unique cognitive and physiological factors, is a winner of ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... March 31, 2016  Genomics firm Nabsys has completed ... Barrett Bready , M.D., who returned to the ... original technical leadership team, including Chief Technology Officer, ... Development, Steve Nurnberg and Vice President of Software and ... company. Dr. Bready served as CEO of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... , ... Intelligent Implant Systems announced today that the two-level components for the ... United States. These components expand the capabilities of the system and allow Revolution™ ... October of 2015, the company has seen significant sales growth in 1Q 2016, and ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... 28, 2016 Q BioMed ... Company,s CEO  was featured in an article he ... VCs Fear To Tread: http://www.lifescienceleader.com/doc/accelerators-enter-when-vcs-fear-to-tread-0001 ... is an essential business journal for life ... biotechs to Big Pharmas. Their content is designed ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... As part of an ... experts, and expanding its LATAM network and logistics capabilities. Enhancements have been ... their clinical trial projects. , The expansion will provide unmatched clinical trial logistics ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... Shimadzu Scientific Instruments (SSI) ... 2016 Marijuana Business Conference and Expo. Shimadzu’s high-performance instruments enable laboratories to test ... Expo attendees can stop by booth 1021 to learn how Shimadzu’s instruments can ...
Breaking Biology Technology: