Navigation Links
MIT creates tiny backpacks for cells
Date:11/6/2008

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- MIT engineers have outfitted cells with tiny "backpacks" that could allow them to deliver chemotherapy agents, diagnose tumors or become building blocks for tissue engineering.

Michael Rubner, director of MIT's Center for Materials Science and Engineering and senior author of a paper on the work that appeared online in Nano Letters on Nov. 5, said he believes this is the first time anyone has attached such a synthetic patch to a cell.

The polymer backpacks allow researchers to use cells to ferry tiny cargoes and manipulate their movements using magnetic fields. Since each patch covers only a small portion of the cell surface, it does not interfere with the cell's normal functions or prevent it from interacting with the external environment.

"The goal is to perturb the cell as little as possible," said Robert Cohen, the St. Laurent Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT and an author of the paper.

The researchers worked with B and T cells, two types of immune cells that can home to various tissues in the body, including tumors, infection sites, and lymphoid tissues a trait that could be exploited to achieve targeted drug or vaccine delivery.

"The idea is that we use cells as vectors to carry materials to tumors, infection sites or other tissue sites," said Darrell Irvine, an author of the paper and associate professor of materials science and engineering and biological engineering.

Cellular backpacks carrying chemotherapy agents could target tumor cells, while cells equipped with patches carrying imaging agents could help identify tumors by binding to protein markers expressed by cancer cells.

Another possible application is in tissue engineering. Patches could be designed that allow researchers to align cells in a certain pattern, eliminating the need for a tissue scaffold.

The polymer patch system consists of three layers, each with a different function, stacked onto a surface. The bottom layer tethers the polymer to the surface, the middle layer contains the payload, and the top layer serves as a "hook" that catches and binds cells.

Once the layers are set up, cells enter the system and flow across the surface, getting stuck on the polymer hooks. The patch is then detached from the surface by simply lowering the temperature, and the cells float away, with backpacks attached.

"The rest of the cell is untouched and able to interact with the environment," said Albert Swiston, lead author of the paper and a graduate student in materials science and engineering.

The researchers found that T cells with backpacks were able to perform their normal functions, including migrating across a surface, just as they would without anything attached.

By loading the backpacks with magnetic nanoparticles, the researchers can control the cells' movement with a magnetic field.

Because the polymer synthesis and assembly takes place before the patches are attached to cells, there is plenty of opportunity to tweak the process to improve the polymers' effectiveness and ensure they won't be toxic to cells, the researchers say.


'/>"/>

Contact: Teresa Herbert
therbert@mit.edu
617-258-5403
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Early-stage gene transcription creates access to DNA
2. MIT creates new material for fuel cells
3. Novel living system recreates predator-prey interaction
4. Using evolution, UW team creates a template for many new therapeutic agents
5. Auto immune response creates barrier to fertility; could be a step in speciation
6. MIT creates 3-D images of living cell
7. Accelerometer backpacks aid study of gliding behavior in the flying lemur
8. Scripps research scientists identify compounds for stem-cell production from adult cells
9. Lung airway cells activate vitamin D and increase immune response
10. New method provides panoramic view of protein-RNA interactions in living cells
11. Simple chemical procedure augments therapeutic potential of stem cells
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/30/2017)... The research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) ... ground breaking 3D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, pushing contactless ... use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of access and ... ... A research team led by Dr Ajay Kumar ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... 2017 The report "Video Surveillance ... Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, VMS), and Service ... Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market was ... projected to reach USD 75.64 Billion by 2022, at ... base year considered for the study is 2016 and ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Biometric Vehicle Access ... 15.1% over the next decade to reach approximately $1,580 million by ... and forecasts for all the given segments on global as well ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/17/2017)... Village, CA (PRWEB) , ... August 17, 2017 ... ... technology for cancer research and personalized medicine, today announced the launch of a ... Kansas City, Missouri. The study’s goal is to evaluate the potential for early ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... August 16, 2017 , ... Today, 3Bar Biologics Inc ... $2M in funding from an impressive group of investors, including Rev1 Ventures, Maumee ... With this investment, 3Bar is broadening availability of its groundbreaking offering that uses ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... Charlotte, NC (PRWEB) , ... August 15, 2017 , ... ... in 2017, celebrating 10 years of successes helping medical technology companies and inventors develop ... company to a renowned full-service national engineering firm with a portfolio of clients in ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... , ... August 15, 2017 , ... The Conference ... on Immuno-Oncology 360° (IO360°) programming through a series of upcoming panels and events. The ... 7-9, 2018, at The Roosevelt Hotel in New York City. , “With our experience ...
Breaking Biology Technology: