Navigation Links
MIT: Stripes key to nanoparticle drug delivery
Date:6/9/2008

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--In work that could at the same time impact the delivery of drugs and explain a biological mystery, MIT engineers have created the first synthetic nanoparticles that can penetrate a cell without poking a hole in its protective membrane and killing it.

The key to their approach? Stripes.

The team found that gold nanoparticles coated with alternating bands of two different kinds of molecules can quickly pass into cells without harming them, while those randomly coated with the same materials cannot. The research was reported in a recent advance online publication of Nature Materials.

"We've created the first fully synthetic material that can pass through a cell membrane without rupturing it, and we've found that order on the nanometer scale is necessary to provide this property," said Francesco Stellacci, an associate professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and co-leader of the work with Darrell Irvine, the Eugene Bell Career Development Associate Professor of Tissue Engineering.

In addition to the practical applications of such nanoparticles for drug delivery and more-the MIT team used them to deliver fluorescent imaging agents to cells-the tiny spheres could help explain how some biological materials such as peptides are able to enter cells.

"No one understands how these biologically derived cell-penetrating materials work," said Irvine. "So we could use the new particles to learn more about their biological counterparts. Could they be analogues of the biological system?"

When a cell membrane recognizes a foreign object such as a nanoparticle, it normally wraps around or "eats" it, encasing the object in a smaller bubble inside the cell that can eventually be excreted. Any drugs or other agents attached to the nanoparticle therefore never reach the main fluid section of the cell, or cytosol, where they could have an effect.

Such nanoparticles can also be "chaperoned" by biological molecules into the cytosol, but this too has drawbacks. Chaperones can work in some cells but not others, and carry one cargo but not another.

Hence the importance of the MIT work in developing nanoparticles that can directly penetrate the cell membrane, deliver their cargo to the cytosol, and do so without killing the cell.

Irvine compares the feat to a phenomenon kids can discover. "If you have a soap film and you poke it with a bubble wand, you'll pop it," he said. "But if you coat the bubble wand with soap before poking the film, it will pass through the film without popping it because it's coated with the same material." Stellacci notes that the coated nanoparticles have properties similar to the cell membrane-not identical-but the analogy is still apt.

Stellacci first reported the creation of the striped nanoparticles in a 2004 Nature Materials paper. At the time, "we noticed that they interacted with proteins in an interesting way," he said. "Could they also have interesting interactions with cells?" Four years later, he and his colleagues report a resounding "yes."


'/>"/>

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Nanoparticles assemble by millions to encase oil drops
2. Environmental fate of nanoparticles depends on properties of water carrying them
3. Researchers mimic bacteria to produce magnetic nanoparticles
4. Astronomy technology brings nanoparticle probes into sharper focus
5. Technique controls nanoparticle size, makes large numbers
6. MIT: Remote-control nanoparticles deliver drugs directly into tumors
7. Nanoparticle exposures happen, says expert
8. New nanoparticle vaccine is more effective but less expensive
9. Novel 3-D cell culture model shows selective tumor uptake of nanoparticles
10. Micro-origami: USC folds up micrometer-scale voxels for drug delivery
11. Fewer babies born after Caesarean delivery
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/30/2017)... Today, American Trucking Associations announced Seeing ... and eye tracking software, became the newest member ... "Artificial intelligence and advanced sensing algorithms ... driver,s attentiveness levels while on the road.  Drivers ... fatigue and prevent potential accidents, which could lead ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... GENOA, Italy , May 23, 2017  Hunova, the first robotic ... and trunk, has been officially launched in Genoa, Italy ... Europe and the USA . The ... launched on the market by the IIT spin-off Movendo Technology thanks to ... view the Multimedia News Release, please click: ...
(Date:5/6/2017)... 5, 2017 RAM Group , ... new breakthrough in biometric authentication based on a ... properties to perform biometric authentication. These new sensors are ... created by Ram Group and its partners. This sensor ... supply chains and security. Ram Group is a ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries to improve patient outcomes and quality of life, will ... analytical testing are being attributed to new regulatory requirements for all new drug ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ComplianceOnline’s Medical Device Summit is ... and 8th June 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The Summit brings together current and ... distinguished CEOs, board directors and government officials from around the world to address key ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... implantation and pregnancy rates in frozen and fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF) ... and maternal age to IVF success. , After comparing the results from the ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... ... Dr. Bob Harman, founder and CEO of VetStem Biopharma, Inc. spent ... entitled “Stem Cells and Their Regenerative Powers,” was held on August 31st, 2017 ... joined by two human doctors: Peter B. Hanson, M.D., Chief of Orthopedic Surgery, Grossmont ...
Breaking Biology Technology: