Navigation Links
MIT: New tissue scaffold regrows cartilage and bone
Date:5/11/2009

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--MIT engineers and colleagues have built a new tissue scaffold that can stimulate bone and cartilage growth when transplanted into the knees and other joints.

The scaffold could offer a potential new treatment for sports injuries and other cartilage damage, such as arthritis, says Lorna Gibson, the Matoula S. Salapatas Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and co-leader of the research team with Professor William Bonfield of Cambridge University.

"If someone had a damaged region in the cartilage, you could remove the cartilage and the bone below it and put our scaffold in the hole," said Gibson. The researchers describe their scaffold in a recent series of articles in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research.

The technology has been licensed to Orthomimetics, a British company launched by one of Gibson's collaborators, Andrew Lynn of Cambridge University. The company recently started clinical trials in Europe.

The scaffold has two layers, one that mimics bone and one that mimics cartilage. When implanted into a joint, the scaffold can stimulate mesenchymal stem cells in the bone marrow to produce new bone and cartilage. The technology is currently limited to small defects, using scaffolds roughly 8 mm in diameter.

The researchers demonstrated the scaffold's effectiveness in a 16-week study involving goats. In that study, the scaffold successfully stimulated bone and cartilage growth after being implanted in the goats' knees.

The project, a collaboration enabled by the Cambridge-MIT Institute, began when the team decided to build a scaffold for bone growth. They started with an existing method to produce a skin scaffold, made of collagen (from bovine tendon) and glycosaminoglycan, a long polysaccharide chain. To mimic the structure of bone, they developed a technique to mineralize the collagen scaffold by adding sources of calcium and phosphate.

Once that was done, the team decided to try to create a two-layer scaffold to regenerate both bone and cartilage (known as an osteochondral scaffold). Their method produces two layers with a gradual transition between the bone and cartilage layers.

"We tried to design it so it's similar to the transition in the body. That's one of the unique things about it," said Gibson.

There are currently a few different ways to treat cartilage injuries, including stimulating the bone marrow to release stem cells by drilling a hole through the cartilage into the bone; transplanting cartilage and the underlying bone from another, less highly loaded part of the joint; or removing cartilage cells from the body, stimulating them to grow in the lab and re-implanting them.

The new scaffold could offer a more effective, less expensive, easier and less painful substitute for those therapies, said Gibson.


'/>"/>

Contact: Elizabeth Thomson
thomson@mit.edu
617-258-5402
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. NIST issues first reference material for tissue engineering
2. Lithium may help radiation target cancer, spare healthy tissue
3. Gene therapy appears safe to regenerate gum tissue
4. Model tissue system reveals cellular communication via amino acids
5. Therapeutic hypothermia is promising strategy to minimize tissue damage
6. Stem cells replace stroke-damaged tissue in rats
7. A new way to assemble cells into 3-D microtissues
8. High-fat diets inflame fat tissue around blood vessels, contribute to heart disease
9. Advancement in tissue engineering promotes oral wound healing
10. Building better bones and tissue in the lab
11. Columbia University scientist devises new way to more rapidly generate bone tissue
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/1/2016)... 2016  Today, the first day of American Heart ... develop a first of its kind workplace health solution ... In the first application of Watson ... ), and Welltok will create a new offering that ... analytics, delivered on Welltok,s health optimization platform. The effort ...
(Date:1/25/2016)... SEATTLE , Jan. 25, 2016  Glencoe Software, ... biotech, pharma and publication industries, will provide the data ... Phenotypic Screening Centre (NPSC). ... Phenotypic analysis ... even whole organisms, allowing comparisons between states such as ...
(Date:1/20/2016)... Jan. 20, 2016   MedNet Solutions , an ... spectrum of clinical research, is pleased to announce the ... achievements are the result of the company,s laser focus ... eClinical , it,s comprehensive, easy-to-use and highly affordable ... --> Key MedNet growth achievements in 2015 include: ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... 2016  Bioethics International, a not-for-profit organization focused on the ... and made accessible to patients around the world, today announced ... the publication of the Good Pharma Scorecard an ... featured as one of BMJ Open ,s ,Most Popular ... are most frequently read. Ed Sucksmith , assistant ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016  Dovetail Genomics™ LLC ... its beta program for a planned metagenomic genome assembly ... the company,s metagenomic genome assembly method in a talk ... Genome Biology & Technology conference in Orlando, ... these highly complex datasets is difficult. Using its proprietary ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... 11, 2016 , ... Global Stem Cells Group, ... Global Stem Cells Network (GSCN) to distribute exosome injection and other biological products ... Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Colombia, Argentina, Nicaragua, Panama, El Salvador, Venezuela, Peru, Ecuador, ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Feb. 10, 2016  The Maryland House of Delegates ... announced that University of Maryland School of Medicine Dean ... University of Maryland Medical System President and CEO ... Medallion," the highest honor given to the public by ... Dean Reece and Mr. Chrencik for their ...
Breaking Biology Technology: