Navigation Links
M.I.N.D. Institute researchers call for fragile X testing throughout the lifespan
Date:11/25/2008

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) Writing in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association, UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute researchers urge physicians to test for mutations of the fragile X gene in patients of all ages. That's because, after decades of research, it is clear that mutations in this gene cause a range of diseases, including neurodevelopmental delays and autism in children, infertility in women and neurodegenerative disease in older adults.

"We want to notify specialists in a variety of areas, as well as allied health professionals, of the potential impact of the fragile X mutation at different times in patients' lives," said Randi Hagerman, director of the Fragile X Research and Treatment Center at the UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute.

Hagerman, who is also the institute's medical director, co-authored the commentary with fellow M.I.N.D. Institute researcher and husband, Paul Hagerman, who is also director of the UC Davis NeuroTherapeutics Research Institute (NTRI).

Without testing for fragile X mutations, the Hagermans write, patients can be misdiagnosed.

"These patients don't have the advantage of targeted treatments and specific therapies," Randi Hagerman said.

The families of these patients are also at risk because the mutations are passed on from generation to generation.

"The patients don't realize that a genetic mutation is causing all of these seemingly unrelated diseases in their families," she said.

Research by the Hagermans and others has shown that mutations of the fragile X gene can cause, among other disorders, autism and ADHD in children, anxiety disorders at all ages, early menopause in women and dementia in the elderly.

Because the potential impact is so great, M.I.N.D. Institute researchers have created an inexpensive spot blood test for newborn screening that is currently in clinical trials.

Until testing for fragile X is widespread, the Hagermans urge genetic testing for all patients who show signs of diseases now known to be linked to FMR1 mutations.

Abnormalities in the fragile X gene fall into two categories: those caused by the full mutation and those associated with the premutation.

The full mutation involves greater than 200 copies of a three-nucleotide sequence (CGG) in the FMR1 gene found on the X chromosome.Normal individuals typically have fewer than 40 repeats.

The premutation involves 55-200 CGG repeats in this gene. Individuals with the premutation are known as carriers and the children of female carriers are more likely to be born with the full mutation.

The full mutation of the FMR1 gene causes fragile X syndrome, for which there is no cure, but targeted treatments that may reverse this disorder are currently being tested at the MIND Institute. Without a normal copy of the fragile X gene, a vital protein is not made and the result is the onset of characteristic mental disorders, which can range from learning disabilities to severe cognitive or intellectual disabilities, such as autism.

In fact, 30 percent of boys with the fragile X mutation are diagnosed with autism. Fragile X syndrome is the most commonly known single-gene cause of autism, responsible for between 2 and 6 percent of autism cases.

In girls, the full mutation often manifests as shyness, math learning disability and social anxiety.

Treatment of the syndrome depends on its manifestations in the individual, and ranges from behavioral therapy to medication.

Last year, the Hagermans and their colleagues reported that the fragile X premutation may be twice as common as previously suspected, potentially affecting over one million men, women and children in the United States.

The premutation can cause attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder in children; primary ovarian failure (early menopause) in women; and FXTAS, or fragile X- associated tremor-ataxia syndrome, in older adults.

The Hagermans and their colleagues at the M.I.N.D. Institute are conducting clinical trials of targeted drug treatments that have shown promise in animal studies.

They write: "These trials, if successful, make the case for newborn screening (for fragile X syndrome) more compelling and raise the prospect of future intervention during the developmental period to prevent long-term disability."


'/>"/>

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis - Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. EPA teams with National Geographic Society and World Resources Institute to map ecosystem services
2. Salk researcher Terry Sejnowski elected to Institute of Medicine
3. Broad Institute awarded major grant to bolster epigenomics research
4. Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics celebrates 10th birthday by presenting major gifts to human health
5. Wistar Institute researcher receives New Innovator award from NIH
6. Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics 10th Anniversary Conference
7. Syracuse University partners with Serum Institute of India to develop vaccines for children
8. Cornell gets $10 million NSF grant to establish new sustainability institute
9. Eli and Edythe L. Broad make unprecedented gift to endow Broad Institute of Harvard & MIT
10. NYU Cancer Institute researcher among first NIH EUREKA award recipients
11. Broad Institute awarded grant to develop chemical probes for human biology and disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/2/2017)... -- Who risk to be deprived of its imprint ... https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4313699/ WILL APPLE AND SAMSUNG CONFRONT ... sensors using capacitive technology represent a fast growing market, ... an increase of 360% of the number of fingerprint ... sensor market between 2014 and 2017 (source : N+1 ...
(Date:2/28/2017)... , February 28, 2017 News solutions ... ... Amsterdam from 14 to 16 March, Materna will ... and show how seamless travel is a real benefit for passengers. ... added biometrics to their passenger touch point solutions to take passengers ...
(Date:2/24/2017)...  EyeLock LLC, a leader of iris-based identity ... biometric solution on the latest Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 835 ... World Congress 2017 (February 27 – March ... 3, Stand 3E10. The Snapdragon ... platform—a combination of hardware, software and biometrics ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... , March 23, 2017 Kineta, Inc., ... of novel therapies in immuno-oncology, today announced the ... small molecule compounds that activate interferon response factor ... and demonstrate immune-mediated tumor regression in a murine ... study who demonstrated complete tumor regression to initial ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017  Agriculture technology company Cool Planet has ... note conversion to commercialize its Cool Terra and Cool ... developing products that are simultaneously profitable as well as ... last 18 months. This latest round of funding was ... The company,s primary product, Cool Terra, ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: REGN), today announced a ... Biobank and GSK to generate genetic sequence data from the ... will enable researchers to gain valuable insights to support advances ... of serious and life threatening diseases. ... Genetic evidence has revolutionized ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 2017  UBM and the Massachusetts Medical Device ... partnership and the third annual Massachusetts Medtech Week. Massachusetts ... st Annual MassMEDIC Conference held in conjunction ... 2017. MassMEDIC will feature a ... and CEO, Scott Whitaker , at its ...
Breaking Biology Technology: