Navigation Links
Low levels of vitamin D linked to muscle fat, decreased strength in young people
Date:3/5/2010

This release is available in French.

There's an epidemic in progress, and it has nothing to do with the flu. A ground-breaking study published in the March 2010 Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found an astonishing 59 per cent of study subjects had too little Vitamin D in their blood. Nearly a quarter of the group had serious deficiencies (less than 20 ng/ml) of this important vitamin. Since Vitamin D insufficiency is linked to increased body fat, decreased muscle strength and a range of disorders, this is a serious health issue.

"Vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for other diseases," explains principal investigator, Dr. Richard Kremer, co-director of the Musculoskeletal Axis of the Research Institute of the MUHC. "Because it is linked to increased body fat, it may affect many different parts of the body. Abnormal levels of Vitamin D are associated with a whole spectrum of diseases, including cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes, as well as cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders."

The study by Dr. Kremer and co-investigator Dr. Vincente Gilsanz, head of musculoskeletal imaging at the Children's Hospital Los Angeles of the University of Southern California, is the first to show a clear link between Vitamin D levels and the accumulation of fat in muscle tissue a factor in muscle strength and overall health. Scientists have known for years that Vitamin D is essential for muscle strength. Studies in the elderly have showed bedridden patients quickly gain strength when given Vitamin D.

The study results are especially surprising, because study subjects all healthy young women living in California could logically be expected to benefit from good diet, outdoor activities and ample exposure to sunshine the trigger that causes the body to produce Vitamin D.

"We are not yet sure what is causing Vitamin D insufficiency in this group," says Dr. Kremer who is also Professor of Medicine at McGill University. High levels of Vitamin D could help reduce body fat. Or, fat tissues might absorb or retain Vitamin D, so that people with more fat are likely to also be Vitamin D deficient."

The results extend those of an earlier study by Dr. Kremer and Dr. Gilsanz, which linked low levels of Vitamin D to increased visceral fat in a young population. "In the present study, we found an inverse relationship between Vitamin D and muscle fat," Dr. Kremer says. "The lower the levels of Vitamin D the more fat in subjects' muscles."

While study results may inspire some people to start taking Vitamin D supplements, Dr. Kremer recommends caution. "Obviously this subject requires more study," he says. "We don't yet know whether Vitamin D supplementation would actually result in less accumulation of fat in the muscles or increase muscle strength. We need more research before we can recommend interventions. We need to take things one step at a time."


'/>"/>

Contact: Julie Robert
julie.robert@muhc.mcgill.ca
514-934-1934
McGill University Health Centre
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UI study measures levels of PCBs flowing from Indiana canal to air and water
2. Low levels of antibiotics cause multidrug resistance in superbugs
3. Low socioeconomic status affects cortisol levels in children over time
4. New gene variants associated with glucose, insulin levels, some with diabetes risk
5. Even at sublethal levels, pesticides may slow the recovery of wild salmon populations
6. U of As David Schindler confirms untold levels of oil sands pollution on the Athabasca
7. CO2 levels rising in troposphere over rural areas
8. Increased nicotine levels detected in those who light-up earlier
9. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity problems associated with low folate levels in pregnant women
10. Latest analysis confirms suboptimal vitamin D levels in millions of US children
11. Geologists studying groundwater arsenic levels in India empower Bengali women, children
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/15/2016)... 2016 Recent publicized breaches in cyber security ... ways to ensure data security and user authentication in ... Android that ties a user,s mobile number ... a hardware authorization token. Customer service agents who employ ... their KodeKey enabled device to verify their identity.  Companies ...
(Date:1/11/2016)... 11, 2016 Synaptics Incorporated (NASDAQ: SYNA ... announced that its ClearPad ® TouchView ™ ... two separate categories in the 8 th Annual ... Technology Breakthrough. The Synaptics ® TDDI solution enables ... chain, thinner devices, brighter displays and borderless designs. ...
(Date:1/8/2016)... NXTD ), a company focused ... a privately held leading direct seller of vacation and ... fastest-growing company announced that on December 31, 2015, that ... Nxt-ID to develop a proprietary new wireless smart card ... a unique smart wallet that serves to securely store ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 04, 2016 , ... ... talent development and compliance training, today announced an interactive FDA compliance training ... The RAPS (Regulatory Affairs Professional Society) accredited interactive course on Morf Playbook—now ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... -- Beike Biotechnology, the Shenzhen ... in late 2015 to mark their successful combined efforts ... --> --> The signing, ... Therapy" was hosted by the Shenzhen Cell Bank and ... Beike Biotechnology Co., Ltd. Shenzhen,s ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... , Feb. 4, 2016  Spherix Incorporated (Nasdaq: ... fostering and monetization of intellectual property, today provided an ... in the Northern District of Texas ... Inter Partes Re-examination ("IPR") proceedings ... Office.  The IPR was initiated on only certain claims ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... , Feb. 3, 2016   ViaCyte, Inc ... the first pluripotent stem cell-derived islet replacement therapy ... clinical-stage development, today announced that ViaCyte and Janssen ... of Johnson & Johnson, have agreed to consolidate ... ViaCyte.  The agreement provides ViaCyte with an exclusive ...
Breaking Biology Technology: