Navigation Links
Low levels of vitamin D linked to muscle fat, decreased strength in young people
Date:3/5/2010

This release is available in French.

There's an epidemic in progress, and it has nothing to do with the flu. A ground-breaking study published in the March 2010 Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found an astonishing 59 per cent of study subjects had too little Vitamin D in their blood. Nearly a quarter of the group had serious deficiencies (less than 20 ng/ml) of this important vitamin. Since Vitamin D insufficiency is linked to increased body fat, decreased muscle strength and a range of disorders, this is a serious health issue.

"Vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for other diseases," explains principal investigator, Dr. Richard Kremer, co-director of the Musculoskeletal Axis of the Research Institute of the MUHC. "Because it is linked to increased body fat, it may affect many different parts of the body. Abnormal levels of Vitamin D are associated with a whole spectrum of diseases, including cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes, as well as cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders."

The study by Dr. Kremer and co-investigator Dr. Vincente Gilsanz, head of musculoskeletal imaging at the Children's Hospital Los Angeles of the University of Southern California, is the first to show a clear link between Vitamin D levels and the accumulation of fat in muscle tissue a factor in muscle strength and overall health. Scientists have known for years that Vitamin D is essential for muscle strength. Studies in the elderly have showed bedridden patients quickly gain strength when given Vitamin D.

The study results are especially surprising, because study subjects all healthy young women living in California could logically be expected to benefit from good diet, outdoor activities and ample exposure to sunshine the trigger that causes the body to produce Vitamin D.

"We are not yet sure what is causing Vitamin D insufficiency in this group," says Dr. Kremer who is also Professor of Medicine at McGill University. High levels of Vitamin D could help reduce body fat. Or, fat tissues might absorb or retain Vitamin D, so that people with more fat are likely to also be Vitamin D deficient."

The results extend those of an earlier study by Dr. Kremer and Dr. Gilsanz, which linked low levels of Vitamin D to increased visceral fat in a young population. "In the present study, we found an inverse relationship between Vitamin D and muscle fat," Dr. Kremer says. "The lower the levels of Vitamin D the more fat in subjects' muscles."

While study results may inspire some people to start taking Vitamin D supplements, Dr. Kremer recommends caution. "Obviously this subject requires more study," he says. "We don't yet know whether Vitamin D supplementation would actually result in less accumulation of fat in the muscles or increase muscle strength. We need more research before we can recommend interventions. We need to take things one step at a time."


'/>"/>

Contact: Julie Robert
julie.robert@muhc.mcgill.ca
514-934-1934
McGill University Health Centre
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. UI study measures levels of PCBs flowing from Indiana canal to air and water
2. Low levels of antibiotics cause multidrug resistance in superbugs
3. Low socioeconomic status affects cortisol levels in children over time
4. New gene variants associated with glucose, insulin levels, some with diabetes risk
5. Even at sublethal levels, pesticides may slow the recovery of wild salmon populations
6. U of As David Schindler confirms untold levels of oil sands pollution on the Athabasca
7. CO2 levels rising in troposphere over rural areas
8. Increased nicotine levels detected in those who light-up earlier
9. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity problems associated with low folate levels in pregnant women
10. Latest analysis confirms suboptimal vitamin D levels in millions of US children
11. Geologists studying groundwater arsenic levels in India empower Bengali women, children
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... N.Y. , June 23, 2017  IBM (NYSE: ... dairy research, today announced a new collaboration using next-generation ... chances that the global milk supply is impacted by ... Cornell University has become the newest academic institution to ... a food safety initiative that includes IBM Research, Mars, ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... , June 15, 2017  IBM (NYSE: IBM ) is ... tech event dedicated to developing collaboration between startups and global ... June 15-17. During the event, nine startups will showcase the ... in various industries. France ... international market, with a 30 percent increase in the number ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... Italy , May 23, 2017  Hunova, the first robotic gym ... trunk, has been officially launched in Genoa, Italy . ... Europe and the USA . The technology ... on the market by the IIT spin-off Movendo Technology thanks to a ... the Multimedia News Release, please click: ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Biova, LLC., the leader ... joined Biova’s Board of Directors. Dr. Henig will bring a wealth of scientific experience ... served as the Chief Technical and Scientific Officer of four major global companies in ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... ... the latest version of LimitLIS®, its rapidly growing Laboratory Information System. , LimitLIS® ... adoption, ensure installation integrity, and provide more customization options. Each of these has ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2017 , ... Ken Hanson, ... president of Physik Instrumente USA, have been selected as this year’s recipients of two ... The two have been invited along with other honorees to accept their awards at ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... ... all six of their healthcare job boards. As the largest network of ... therapists, and biotechnicians, DocCafe.com and the MedJobCafe.com Health Network work to match ...
Breaking Biology Technology: