Navigation Links
Liposome-hydrogel hybrids: No toil, no trouble for stronger bubbles
Date:6/9/2010

People have been combining materials to bring forth the best properties of both ever since copper and tin were merged to start the Bronze Age. In the latest successful merger, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the University of Maryland (UM) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have developed a method to combine two substances that individually have generated interest for their potential biomedical applications: a phospholipid membrane "bubble" called a liposome and particles of hydrogel, a water-filled network of polymer chains. The combination forms a hybrid nanoscale (billionth of a meter) particle that may one day travel directly to specific cells such as tumors, pass easily though the target's cell membrane, and then slowly release a drug payload.

In a recent paper in the journal Langmuir*, the research team reviewed how liposomes and hydrogel nanoparticles have individual advantages and disadvantages for drug delivery. While liposomes have useful surface properties that allow them to target specific cells and pass through membranes, they can rupture if the surrounding environment changes. Hydrogel nanoparticles are more stable and possess controlled release capabilities to tune the dosage of a drug over time, but are prone to degradation and clumping. The researchers' goal was to engineer nanoparticles incorporating both components to utilize the strengths of each material while compensating for their weaknesses.

To manufacture their liposome-hydrogel hybrid vesicles, the researchers adapted a NIST-UM technique known as COMMAND for COntrolled Microfluidic Mixing And Nanoparticle Determination that uses a microscopic fluidic (microfluidic) device (see "NIST, Maryland Researchers COMMAND a Better Class of Liposomes" in NIST Tech Beat, April 27, 2010). In the new work, phospholipid molecules are dissolved in isopropyl alcohol and fed via a tiny (21 micrometers in diameter, or three times the size of a yeast cell) inlet channel into a "mixer" channel, then "focused" into a fluid jet by a water-based solution added through two side channels. Hydrogel precursor molecules are mixed in with the focusing fluid.

As the components blend together at the interfaces of the fluid streams, the phospholipid molecules self-assemble into nanoscale vesicles of controlled size and trap the monomers in solution inside. The newly formed vesicles then are irradiated with ultraviolet light to polymerize the hydrogel precursors they carry into a solid gel made up of cross-linked chains. These chains give strength to the vesicles while permitting them to retain the spherical shape of the liposome envelope (which, in turn, would facilitate passage through a cell membrane).

To turn the liposome-hydrogel hybrid vesicles into cellular delivery vehicles, a drug or other cargo would be added to the focusing fluid during production.


'/>"/>

Contact: Michael E. Newman
michael.newman@nist.gov
301-975-3025
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Tough new spuds take on double trouble
2. Tigers in serious trouble around the world, including here in the US
3. Double trouble: Bacterial super-infection after the flu
4. Troublesome green algae serve as coating substrate in record-setting battery
5. Normal cells far from cancer give nanosignals of trouble
6. Tummy troubles -- gastrin key in bacterial-induced stomach cancer
7. Troubled waters: Low Apalachicola River flow may hurt gulf fisheries
8. Double trouble for water life
9. In troubled economic times, BioSquare 2009 successfully serves as business and innovation starter
10. Penguins marching into trouble
11. Dry spells spelled trouble in ancient China
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Liposome-hydrogel hybrids: No toil, no trouble for stronger bubbles
(Date:4/15/2016)... 15, 2016  A new partnership announced today ... underwriting decisions in a fraction of the time ... and high-value life insurance policies to consumers without ... With Force Diagnostics, rapid testing (A1C, Cotinine and ... (blood pressure, weight, pulse, BMI, and activity data) ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... 31, 2016  Genomics firm Nabsys has completed a ... Barrett Bready , M.D., who returned to the company ... technical leadership team, including Chief Technology Officer, John ... Steve Nurnberg and Vice President of Software and Informatics, ... Dr. Bready served as CEO of Nabsys ...
(Date:3/21/2016)... Massachusetts , March 22, 2016 ... facial recognition with passcodes for superior security   ... ), a leading provider of secure digital communications services, ... their biometric technology and offer enterprise customers, particularly those ... secure facial recognition and voice authentication within a mobile ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Founder of the Fitzmaurice Hand Institute in ... of the hand by the National Board of Physicians and Surgeons, as of ... in his pursuit of providing the most comprehensive, effective treatment for his patients, ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... Lady had been battling arthritis since ... ligament in her left knee. Lady’s owner Hannah sought the help of Dr Jeff ... surgeon, to repair her cruciate ligament and help with the pain of Lady’s arthritis. ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... , ... Last week, Callan Capital, an integrated wealth management firm specializing in ... San Diego Life Science event at the Estancia La Jolla Resort and Spa. , ... speakers Dr. Rich Heyman, former CEO of Aragon and Seragon, and Faheem Hasnain, former ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... May 23, 2016 Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE ... announced that its Board of Directors has approved the payment ... quarter of 2016. The cash dividend of ... 29, 2016 to stockholders of record as of the close ... are subject to approval of the Board of Directors and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: