Navigation Links
Like father, like son: Attractiveness is hereditary
Date:11/19/2007

Sexy dads produce sexy sons, in the insect world at least. While scientists already knew that specific attractive traits, from cricket choruses to peacocks tails, are passed on to their offspring, the heritability of attractiveness as a whole is more contentious. Now, new research by the University of Exeter, published today (20 November) in Current Biology, shows that attractiveness is hereditary.

The research team, based on the University of Exeters Cornwall Campus, focused on the fruitfly Drosophila simulans. They paired up males and females at random and found the length of time it took for them to mate ranged from just two minutes to two hours. Female fruitflies need to make themselves accessible to males for mating to take place, so males cannot force copulation. Therefore, the speed at which mating occurs can be taken as an indication of the attractiveness of the male to his female partner.

After males had mated with around three females each, their sons who were full and half brothers, were paired with single females. Again, the time for copulation to occur was recorded. This allowed the researchers to look at the genetic component of attractiveness. They found that attractiveness is hereditary, passed on from father to son. Previous research has shown that females that mate with attractive males do not produce more offspring than those mating with less desirable males. This study indicates that one benefit females may enjoy by mating with attractive males is that they will produce sexy sons, which are more likely to be successful in mating.

Dr David Hosken of the University of Exeter said: Attractiveness probably cant be defined by individual characteristics, so there is no single physical attribute that female fruitflies are looking for in a mate. However, there is clearly a benefit to females in having sexy sons that are more likely to attract a mate and produce offspring.

Having now shown that attractiveness can be passed on from father to son, the research team believes that the findings could apply to other species. Although not tested, Dr Hosken believes his findings could be applied to humans: Its possible that attractiveness is hereditable across the animal kingdom. It could even be the case in humans that the sexiest dads also have the most desirable sons, which would probably be bad news for my boy.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sarah Hoyle
s.hoyle@exeter.ac.uk
01-392-262-062
University of Exeter
Source:Eurekalert

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/2/2017)... 2017  EyeLock LLC, a market leader of iris-based ... " What You Should Know About Biometrics in the ... authenticity is a growing concern. In traditional schemes, cryptography ... traditional authentication schemes such as username/password suffer from inherent ... offers an elegant solution to the problem of high-security ...
(Date:1/30/2017)... --  Invitae Corporation (NYSE: NVTA ), ... announced that it will report its fourth quarter and ... Monday, February 13, 2017, and Invitae,s management team will ... Eastern / 1:45 p.m. Pacific. During ... results, guidance, and recent developments and will spend the ...
(Date:1/24/2017)... Biopharm Reports has carried out a ... nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). This involved the ... practices, developments, trends and end-user plans over the ... opportunities. These areas include growth in the use ... innovation requirements, hyphenated NMR techniques, main suppliers of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/22/2017)... Scientists propose in Nature blocking a molecule ... maybe other lysosomal storage diseases as a possible treatment ... An international research team led by ... investigators from the University of Lübeck in ... study was conducted in mouse models of lysosomal storage ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... 2017 , ... LabRoots , the leading provider of educational and interactive ... to announce the launch of a new scholarship for young scientists seeking a degree ... scholarship is open to all high school seniors, 17 years or older; as well ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... NDA Partners Chairman Carl ... Deputy Director in the FDA CDRH Division of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Neurological Devices ... as an Expert Consultant. , In Dr. Spyker’s accomplished career, he held positions ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... 2017 Synthetic Biologics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: SYN), ... to protect and restore the health of patients, intends to report ... 2016 on Thursday, March 2, 2017, and to host a conference ... for the call is as follows: U.S. (toll free): ... ...
Breaking Biology Technology: