Navigation Links
Life-saving in the bacterial world: How Campylobacter rely on Pseudomonas to infect humans
Date:10/7/2010

Many a holiday is ruined by food poisoning, frequently caused by the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. Although Campylobacter infections are rarely life-threatening they are extremely debilitating and have been linked with the development of Guillain-Barr syndrome, one of the leading causes of non-trauma-induced paralysis worldwide.

Campylobacter jejuni is well adapted to life in the guts of animals and birds, where it is often found in very high levels. However, to infect humans it also needs to be able to survive outside the gut, on the surface of meat that will be eaten by humans. It is known that C. jejuni cannot grow under normal atmospheric conditions the levels of oxygen are too high for it so how it survives was until recently unknown. The mystery has now been solved by Friederike Hilbert and colleagues at the Institute of Meat Hygiene, Meat Technology and Food Science of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna.

The surface of meat harbours a number of species of bacteria that fortunately are rarely harmful to humans, although they are associated with spoilage. It seems possible that the various species interact and Hilbert hypothesized that such interactions might help bacteria such as Campylobacter jejuni survive under hostile, oxygen-rich conditions. She thus tested the survival of C. jejuni in the presence of various meat-spoiling bacteria. When incubated alone or together with bacteria such as Proteus mirabilis or Enterococcus faecalis, Campylobacter survived atmospheric oxygen levels for no longer than 18 hours. However, when incubated together with various strains of Pseudomonas, Campylobacter were found to survive for much longer, in some cases over 48 hours, which would be easily long enough to cause infection.

There were differences in the extent of prolonged survival depending on the sources of the Campylobacter analysed but all isolates of all strains clearly survived significantly longer in the presence of Pseudomonas bacteria than when cultured alone. And the Campylobacter cells did not change shape when cultured together with Pseudomonas under oxygen-rich conditions, unlike when they were cultured alone, providing further indications of an interaction between the species. Interestingly, there is no evidence that the Pseudomonas benefit at all from the interaction, although they effectively save the lives of the Campylobacter.

Hilbert's findings show clearly that the presence of Pseudomonas bacteria is responsible for significantly enhanced survival of the disease-causing Campylobacter bacteria on the surface of meat. The results have implications for the control of meat, especially poultry, destined for human consumption. As Hilbert says, "On the basis of this study it should be possible to elucidate new mechanisms for limiting the level of Campylobacter on chicken meat and thus the incidence of food poisoning could be much reduced."


'/>"/>

Contact: Prof. Friederike Hilbert
friederike.hilbert@vetmeduni.ac.at
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study finds life-saving trend among seagulls
2. Gene against bacterial attack unravelled
3. Predatory bacterial swarm uses rippling motion to reach prey
4. Nature study demonstrates that bacterial clotting depends on clustering
5. Shifts in soil bacterial populations linked to wetland restoration success
6. Caltech researchers get first 3-D glimpse of bacterial cell-wall architecture
7. Scientists present moving theory behind bacterial decision-making
8. Scientists build roach motel for nasty bugs of the bacterial variety
9. Bacterial biofilms as fossil makers
10. Winter brings flu, summer brings bacterial infections
11. Computation and genomics data drive bacterial research into new golden age
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/27/2017)... March 27, 2017  Catholic Health Services (CHS) ... Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics for achieving Stage 6 ... sm . In addition, CHS previously earned a ... using an electronic medical record (EMR). ... level of EMR usage in an outpatient setting.  ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... PUNE, India , March 23, 2017 The report ... Equipment, Touchless Biometric), Industry, and Geography - Global Forecast to 2022", published by ... growing at a CAGR of 29.63% between 2017 and 2022. ... ... Logo ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 2017 Optimove , provider of ... such as 1-800-Flowers and AdoreMe, today announced two ... Replenishment. Using Optimove,s machine learning algorithms, these features ... replenishment recommendations to their customers based not just ... customer intent drawn from a complex web of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... , ... September 19, 2017 , ... ... largest group of funded early-stage tech companies. “Grit” author Angela Duckworth and her ... joining the ic@3401 community is Cooley, an international law firm with decades of ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The new and improved Oakton® pocket testers, from Cole-Parmer, stand ... with a new cap design that is versatile, functional and leakproof. They are ideal ... test water quality. , The Oakton pocket testers have many user-friendly and functional features. ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... , Sept. 19, 2017 ValGenesis Inc., ... (VLMS) is pleased to announce the strategic partnership with ... provide clients with validation services using the latest technology ... VTI will provide clients with efficient and cost-effective validation ... marketing partner for the ValGenesis VLMS system. ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Molecular Devices, LLC, a leader in protein ... the CloneSelect™ Single-Cell Printer™ in North America. This novel system utilizes sophisticated ... documentation of monoclonality for use in cell line development. , Clonal cell ...
Breaking Biology Technology: