Navigation Links
LSUHSC awarded $2 million dollar grant to prevent pneumonia linked to immune deficiency

New Orleans, LA Dr. Jay Kolls, Professor and Chairman of Genetics at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Medicine, has been awarded a $2.1 million grant over five years by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to determine the role and identify which T-helper cells fight the opportunistic infection, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), which can be a complication of HIV/AIDS. It can also be a complication of cancer, organ or bone marrow transplantation, as well as the chronic use of corticosteroids or other medications that affect the immune system.

Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia remains an important clinical problem and although there is a well-known relationship between CD4 cell count and the risk of Pneumocystis carinii infection, defense mechanisms against it are not fully understood. Dr. Kolls and his research team will study the role of a subset of CD4 cells which he believes are missing in Pneumocystis carinii infection and which when restored, produce an effective immune response to the infection. These are the T-helper cells, Th1, Th2, and Th17. The research funded under this grant will determine the role of interleukin-23 and interleukin-12 in regulating Th1 immunity to Pneumocystis carinii, and the team hopes to show that by vaccinating genetically engineered mice with CD4+ T-cells belonging to any of these T-cell subsets, immunity will be sufficient to protect against PCP.

"This research will define the types of T-cells that are needed to prevent this life-threatening infection," notes Dr. Kolls. "It is our hope that vaccines can activate these cells to prevent or treat PCP."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), which is caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii (formerly P. carinii), is frequently the first serious illness encountered by HIV-infected persons. During the early years of the AIDS epidemic, PCP was the AIDS-defining illness for as many as two thirds of patients in the United States. Although a decline in incidence of PCP occurred during the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), PCP remains the most common serious opportunistic illness in HIV-infected persons. Patients in the developing world without access to PCP prophylaxis or antiretroviral drugs remain at high risk, and PCP continues to develop in certain groups in industrialized countries. There is also a potential for drug resistance to develop.


Contact: Leslie Capo
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Related biology news :

1. LSUHSC awarded patent for compound inhibiting cancer and other diseases
2. LSUHSC research identifies key contributor to Alzheimers disease process
3. LSUHSC student awarded top national honor for diabetes research
4. LSUHSC public health researcher finds reason for weight gain
5. LSUHSC research describes function of key protein in cancer spread
6. LSUHSCs Kolls awarded $1.8 million to improve vaccine strategies for P. carinii pneumonia
7. LSUHSC research helps link schizophrenia to specific DNA region
8. LSUHSCs Bazan awarded ARRA grant to preserve vision
9. LSUHSC shows for first time infant inhalation of ultrafine air pollution linked to adult lung disease
10. Grant supports LSUHSC research on how like cell receptor systems determine very different functions
11. LSUHSC researchers working to prevent diabetic neuropathy
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/29/2015)... , Oct. 29, 2015   MedNet Solutions ... the entire spectrum of clinical research, is pleased to ... High Tech Association (MHTA) as one of only three ... the "Software – Small and Growing" category. The Tekne Awards ... who have shown superior technology innovation and leadership. ...
(Date:10/29/2015)... health pioneer, Joseph C. Kvedar , MD, describes ... wellness, and the business opportunities that arise from it ... Healthy Things . Long before health and wellness ... vice president, Connected Health, Partners HealthCare, was creating a ... the hospital or doctor,s office into the day-to-day lives ...
(Date:10/27/2015)... October 27, 2015 Munich, ... Gaze Mapping technology (ASGM) automatically maps data from mobile ... Glasses , so that they can be quantitatively ... Munich, Germany , October 28-29, 2015. ... data from mobile eye tracking videos created with ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Copper is an essential micronutrient that all ... copper is also toxic to cells. With a $1.3 million award from the ... a systematic study of copper in the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), a ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , November 24, 2015 ... new market research report "Oligonucleotide Synthesis Market by Product ... (PCR, Gene Synthesis, Diagnostic, DNA, RNAi), End-User (Research, Pharmaceutical ... published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to reach ... in 2015, at a CAGR of 10.1% during the ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , November 24, 2015 ... market research report released by Transparency Market Research, the ... at a CAGR of 17.5% during the period between ... Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Volume, Share, Growth, ... non-invasive prenatal testing market to reach a valuation of ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 24, 2015 , ... In harsh industrial processes, the safety ... sensors can represent a weak spot where leaking process media is a possible ... housings , which are designed to tolerate extreme process conditions. They combine rugged ...
Breaking Biology Technology: