Navigation Links
Key component of debilitating lung disease identified
Date:9/12/2008

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a close correlation between the decline in a key component of the lung's antioxidant defense system and the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in humans. COPD is a degenerative condition that decreases the flow of air through the lungs as the lung's air sacs are damaged. A study of lung tissue samples from COPD patients by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that expression of the regulating gene NRF2 was significantly decreased in smokers with advanced COPD compared to smokers without COPD. The study is published in the September 15, 2008, edition of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

The study team was led by Shyam Biswal, PhD, an associate professor in the Bloomberg School's Department of Environmental Health Sciences and the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. According to Biswal, NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2) works as a "master gene" to turn on numerous antioxidant and pollutant-detoxifying genes to protect the lungs from environmental pollutants, such as cigarette smoke. Biswal previously identified that disruption of NRF2 expression in mice caused early onset and severe emphysema, which is a major component of COPD in human. However, the status of this critical pathway in humans with COPD was unclear.

"This work clearly demonstrates that decline in our antioxidant system is involved in progression of COPD, which could also be the case for other environmental diseases," said Biswal. "There is no treatment of COPD, but NRF2 could be a novel target for the development of new drug therapies."

Rubin Tuder, MD, a co-author of the study now with the faculty of the University of Colorado, added, "As we learn how the protective actions of NRF2 are decreased in the course of a lifetime of exposure to cigarette smoke, it opens new venues for the development of novel drugs fitted for individual patients in specific stages of the disease."

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health through an investigator- initiated grant, as well as the Specialized Center for Clinically Oriented Research (SCCOR) at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Lung specimens were provided by the Lung Tissue Research Consortium, which is supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

"COPD affects more than 16 million Americans and is the fourth highest cause of death in the United States," said Robert Wise, MD, professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and director of the Hopkins SCCOR initiative. "It is the only disease among the top 10 causes of death with a rising mortality rate in the United States. It is predicted to be the third largest cause of death by 2020 and has already reached worldwide epidemic proportions."


'/>"/>

Contact: Tim Parsons
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New robot scouts best locations for components of undersea lab
2. A protein sequence associated with Huntington’s disease may become life-saving vaccine component
3. Dissecting the genetic components of adaptation of E. coli to the mouse gut
4. Studying component parts of living cells with carbon nanotube cellular probes
5. A new milestone in the GMES Space Component Program successfully achieved
6. Model for the assembly of advanced, single-molecule-based electronic components developed at Pitt
7. Clemson chemists discover new way antioxidants fight debilitating diseases
8. K-State professors USDA research shows mad cow disease also caused by genetic mutation
9. New studies on the Mediterranean diet confirm its effectiveness for chronic disease prevention
10. African-Americans have unique lung cancer risks from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
11. Gaining a better understanding of kidney diseases
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/13/2017)... UBM,s Advanced Design and Manufacturing event in ... and evolving technology through its 3D Printing and Smart ... the expo portion of the event and feature a ... on trending topics within 3D printing and smart manufacturing. ... will take place June 13-15, 2017 at the Jacob K. ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ:   NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or ... independent Directors Mr. Robin D. Richards and Mr. ... the company,s corporate governance and expertise. ... Gino Pereira , Chief Executive Officer said," ... and benefiting from their considerable expertise as we move forward ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... YORK , April 4, 2017   EyeLock ... today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark ... patent broadly covers the linking of an iris image ... same transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th ... latest patent is very timely given the multi-modal biometric ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/20/2017)... Iowa (PRWEB) , ... June 20, 2017 , ... ... chance to immediately determine the adulterants which pose the most likely threat to ... - 28 of this year. , IFT's annual food expo attracts over ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... , ... June 20, 2017 , ... ... Robbie, PhD, a well-versed leader with extensive assay development and biomarker expertise, as ... Biomedical is a Boston CRO specializing in bio-analytical assay development and sample testing ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... June 20, 2017 , ... GigaGen Inc ... millions-diverse immune repertoires, announces launch of its new Surge(TM) Discovery service ... CEO of GigaGen, will present on Surge at the conference. , Surge is ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... June 19, 2017 , ... ... development reported today that it is launching two new additions of its award-winning ... demonstrating new capabilities at the DIA 2017 Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL, June ...
Breaking Biology Technology: