Navigation Links
Johns Hopkins researchers awarded $32 million
Date:7/12/2011

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded two groups at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine each approximately $2.3 million a year for seven years to establish two Programs of Excellence in Glycosciences. Gerald Hart, Ph.D., director of biological chemistry and Ronald Schnaar, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences, will lead these independent efforts to better understand the roles of sugars in the molecular mechanisms of disease, particularly lung and heart diseases.

"These are not sugars in the diet, but sugar molecules that are found attached to proteins and other molecules in a cell and contribute to how cells communicate with each other," says Schnaar.

The lung disease project led by Schnaar will focus on trying to understand the roles of sugar molecules in lung inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Sugar molecules on cells in the lungs bind to the immune system's inflammatory cells turning off the inflammatory response. This team hopes to further investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of sugar molecules and harness this power to develop new treatments for lung diseases. The team collaborating on lung diseases includes Schnaar, Bruce Bochner, M.D., director of the Asthma and Allergy Center and Zhou Zhu, M.D., Ph.D., of medicine at the school of medicine; James Paulson, Ph.D., of The Scripps Research Institute; and Michael Tiemeyer, Ph.D., of the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center.

The cardiovascular disease project led by Hart aims to investigate the short-term protective properties of proteins decorated with sugars, or glycoproteins, from conditions like heart disease and stroke, and to explore why long term exposure to these same glycoproteins may be dangerous. The group will examine the glycoproteins made and released by heart cells and determine how over time they can contribute to heart failure. The researchers will also study how certain fats with attached sugar groups can progress hardening of the arteries that leads to heart damage and failure. The team collaborating on cardiovascular disease includes Hart; Subroto Chatterjee, Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center; David Kass, M.D., of medicine; Jennifer van Eyk, M.D., director of the Hopkins NHLBI Proteomics Center and professor of medicine; Kevin Yarema, Ph.D., of biomedical engineering; Natasha Zachara, Ph.D., of biological chemistry; and Hui Zhang, Ph.D., of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and Allen Bush, Ph.D., of the University of Maryland Baltimore County.


'/>"/>

Contact: Vanessa McMains
vmcmain1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9410
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Johns Hopkins researchers detect sweet cacophony while listening to cellular cross-talk
2. Johns Hopkins scientists pull proteins tail to curtail cancer
3. Case Western Reserve University works with Johnson & Johnson Services Inc. on research grant
4. Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Pathway to Leadership Grant awarded to Johns Hopkins Early Career investigator
5. Johns Hopkins scientists discover a controller of brain circuitry
6. JDRF announces diabetes research program with Johnson & Johnson
7. Johnson & Johnson award goes to research of the cause of brain cell damage in Parkinsons
8. American Society for Microbiology honors Ryan Johnson
9. UNCs Dr. Sean McLean receives Robert Wood Johnson Foundation award
10. Johns Hopkins researchers reshape basic understanding of cell division
11. Encyclopedia of Life names Dr. Rebecca Johnson a 2011 Rubenstein Fellow
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/15/2016)... , April 15, 2016  A new partnership ... more accurate underwriting decisions in a fraction of ... competitively priced and high-value life insurance policies to ... With Force Diagnostics, rapid testing (A1C, ... data readings (blood pressure, weight, pulse, BMI, and ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... 2016  IMPOWER physicians supporting Medicaid patients in ... clinical standard in telehealth thanks to a new partnership ... platform, IMPOWER patients can routinely track key health measurements, ... index, and, when they opt in, share them with ... a local retail location at no cost. By leveraging ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... LegacyXChange, Inc. (OTC: LEGX ... Protect are pleased to announce our successful effort to ... of writing instruments, ensuring athletes signatures against counterfeiting and ... athletes on LegacyXChange will be assured of ongoing proof ... Bill Bollander , CEO states, "By inserting ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... June 24, 2016 Epic Sciences unveiled ... cancers susceptible to PARP inhibitors by targeting homologous ... (CTCs). The new test has already been incorporated ... multiple cancer types. Over 230 clinical ... response pathways, including PARP, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016   Boston ... of novel compounds designed to target cancer stemness ... has been granted Orphan Drug Designation from the ... treatment of gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) ... inhibitor designed to inhibit cancer stemness pathways by ...
(Date:6/23/2016)...  The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is pleased to announce 24 ... for prostate cancer. Members of the Class of 2016 were selected from a ... Read More About the Class of 2016 PCF Young Investigators ... ... ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... In a ... Hospital in Denmark detail how a patient who developed lymphedema after being treated for ... The results could change the paradigm for dealing with this debilitating, frequent side effect ...
Breaking Biology Technology: