Navigation Links
Jefferson receives $3 million NIH grant to study molecular and genetic mechanisms in platelets

(PHILADELPHIA) Scientists at Jefferson Medical College have received a four-year, $3 million National Institutes of Health grant funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to study variations of platelet function, specifically, the genetics of platelet gene expression. The study aims to find data that can be translated into novel therapeutic strategies and develop better predictors of cardiovascular disease.

"This study is at the leading-edge of platelet genetic research," said principal investigator Paul F. Bray, M.D., the Thomas Drake Martinez Cardeza Professor of Medicine and director, Division of Hematology in the Department of Medicine at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. "We still have a limited understanding of the control mechanisms regulating platelet gene expression. Some patients have hyper-functioning platelets which can lead to strokes and heart attacks. On the other end of the spectrum there are some patients with bleeding disorders because their platelets don't clot well enough. Thus, we are talking about very common clinical problems affecting huge numbers of people. We are hoping to shed some light on how the balance gets tipped from health to disease via changes in these fascinating and complex blood cells."

The study will focus primarily on looking at platelet microRNA. MicroRNA's modify gene expression in all tissues, but little is known about how they function in platelets.

"We believe microRNAs serve as a rheostat for protein synthesis in platelets," said Bray. "There are thousands of different settings. People who suffer clotting problems may have different levels of platelet microRNAs than do healthy people. We are going to study platelet microRNAs from healthy individuals and determine how these levels correlate with platelet function. Once we know the situation in healthy subjects, we can assess the critical microRNA levels in patients with unhealthy platelet function. This may serve as a biomarker to predict who might be at risk for bleeding or clotting in different clinical settings and to predict who may benefit from specific drug therapies."

The study will be conducted at two centers: Thomas Jefferson University and Baylor-College of Medicine in Houston. 180 healthy patients over the age of 18 will be selected and prescreened for any potential drug interaction that may skew the results.

"This is a little different from traditional clinical studies in that we are looking for healthy, medication-free patients," said Bray. "Invariably hospitalized patients are receiving multiple medications that may alter platelet function and distort the results. Therefore, we will do extensive pre-enrollment screening. Fortunately, it is fairly easy to find large numbers of eligible volunteers at large medical centers like Jefferson and Baylor College of Medicine."


Contact: Rick Cushman
Thomas Jefferson University

Related biology news :

1. Jefferson scientists deliver toxic genes to effectively kill pancreatic cancer cells
2. Jefferson Department of Surgery announces new pancreas tumor registry
3. Jefferson scientists discover a key protein regulator of inflammation and cell death
4. Jefferson researcher awarded Landenberger Foundation grant for ALS research
5. Jefferson receives $1.7 million grant to study stem cells in intervertebral discs of the spine
6. US Department of State names UCR entomologist a Jefferson Science Fellow
7. Jefferson scientists identify a new protein involved in longevity
8. Wistar Institute researcher receives New Innovator award from NIH
9. L-1 Identity Solutions Receives $5.9 Million Drivers License Contract Expansion from the State of Mississippi
10. Kount Receives Patent for Device Fingerprinting
11. American College of Medical Genetics receives $13.5M NIH contract
Post Your Comments:
(Date:5/16/2017)... 2017  Veratad Technologies, LLC ( ), an ... identity verification solutions, announced today they will participate as ... 15 thru May 17, 2017, in Washington ... Center. Identity impacts the lives of ... quickly evolving digital world, defining identity is critical to ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... , April 18, 2017  Socionext Inc., a global expert in ... media edge server, the M820, which features the company,s hybrid codec ... provided by Tera Probe, Inc., will be showcased during the upcoming ... NAB show at the Las Vegas Convention ... Click ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... offering. ... market to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during the period ... has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs ... growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... CALIF. (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 , ... San ... part of its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look is ... reach, as the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will also ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 2017 , ... For the second time in three years, ... Award. Representatives of the FirstHand program travelled to Washington, D.C. Tuesday, October 10th, ... mission is to change the trajectory of STEM education in America by dramatically ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... Parks Associates announced today that Tom Kerber , Director ... , October 11 in Scottsdale, Arizona . Kerber will ... safety and security products impact the competitive landscape. ... Parks Associates: Smart Home Devices: Main Purchase Driver ... "The residential security market has experienced continued growth, and the introduction of ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... optimization firm for the life sciences and healthcare industries, announces a presentation by ... Francisco. , The presentation, “Automating GxP Validation for Agile Cloud Platforms,” will present ...
Breaking Biology Technology: