Navigation Links
JDRF funded study links 'hygiene hypothesis' to diabetes prevention
Date:10/6/2008

New York, NY, October 6, 2008 -- A research study funded by JDRF suggests that a common intestinal bacteria may provide some protection from developing type 1 diabetes. The findings provide an important step towards understanding how and why type 1 diabetes develops in people, and may lead to potential cures.

The study, reported this week in Nature Magazine, lends further support to the "hygiene hypothesis," that exposure to an appropriate amount and composition of bacteria may be important to living a healthy life, and that susceptibility to type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders may actually be caused by a lack of exposure to certain parasites and microbes.

In the study, researchers at Yale University and the University of Chicago found that exposure to certain bacteria will trigger an immune system response in mice. That response is believed to be what prevents autoimmune disorders -- conditions where the immune system attacks healthy cells in the body. In people with type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks the beta cells in the pancreas, stopping a person's ability to detect glucose and produce insulin. For the purposes of the study, the bacteria used were harmless microbes typically found in the human intestine. The scientists suggest that safe, measured exposure to certain bacteria may lower the risk of immune disorders.

"This study outcome gives us a new avenue to explore", said JDRF Executive Vice President of Research, Richard A. Insel, MD. "And, with type 1 diabetes in the U.S. and many countries around the world at about a 3% annual rate, every lead is significant. The research gives impetus to better understanding how the bacterial flora in our body influences host immune defenses and responses that provide resistance to the development of type 1 diabetes. This understanding may provide new therapeutic approaches to prevention."

For the study, teams led by Li Wen at Yale and Alexander V. Chervonsky at the University of Chicago used mice that under normal conditions, would not develop diabetes. If raised in a germ-free environment, however, the mice developed diabetes. But mice that were exposed to common intestinal bacteria maintained a lower risk for the disease.


'/>"/>

Contact: Michael Cook
mcook@jdrf.org
212-479-7510
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Mandate for public access to NIH-funded research poised to become law
2. Irritating smells alert special cells, NIH-funded study finds
3. OSU technologies funded for development
4. JDRF-funded clinical trial demonstrates continuous glucose monitoring improves blood sugar control
5. Childhood obesity indicates greater risk of school absenteeism, Penn study reveals
6. A study by the MUHC and McGill University opens a new door to understanding cancer
7. Study begins to reveal clues to the cause and progression of sepsis
8. Clones on task serve greater good, evolutionary study shows
9. New study warns limited carbon market puts 20 percent of tropical forest at risk
10. New study examines how rearing environment can alter navigation
11. Study links cat disease to flame retardants in furniture and to pet food
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/21/2016)... India , January 21, 2016 ... According to a new market research report "Emotion Detection ... and Others), Software Tools (Facial Expression, Voice Recognition ... Regions - Global forecast to 2020", published by ... is expected to reach USD 22.65 Billion by ...
(Date:1/15/2016)... , Jan. 15, 2016 Recent publicized ... small to find new ways to ensure data security ... iOS and Android that ties ... biometrics, transforming it into a hardware authorization token. Customer ... swipe their fingerprint on their KodeKey enabled device to ...
(Date:1/8/2016)... MANCHESTER, United Kingdom , Jan. 8, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... sensor-based diagnostic products, today announced the closing of a $9 ... investors.  Proceeds from the financing will be used to accelerate ... device for detecting early-stage pressure ulcers. ... after receiving CE Mark approval. The device,s introduction has been ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... Stockton has an active R&D program for the ... area, the Group has a unique research and development center ... in developing Bio Control products. Stockton ... parameters and regulatory guidelines, and is active in more than ... Stockton,s flagship product Timorex Gold ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... , ... February 06, 2016 , ... ... , The Center for Excellence in Education Sponsors Teacher Training Program , ... February 4, 2016 – The Center for Excellence in Education (CEE) will sponsor ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... -- Amarantus BioScience Holdings, Inc. ... products for Regenerative Medicine, Neurology and Orphan Diseases, announced ... from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ... granted orphan drug designation (ODD) by the US FDA ... Inc. (OTCQB: AMBS), a biotechnology company ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... , Feb. 4, 2016  Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. ... editing, announced today that Edward Lanphier , Sangamo,s ... on the progress of Sangamo,s ZFP Therapeutic ® ... strategy at 2:40 pm ET on Thursday, February 11, ... Global Healthcare Conference. The conference is being held in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: