Navigation Links
Ireland Cancer Center researchers advance stem cell gene therapy
Date:12/12/2007

Ireland Cancer Center of University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers have recently made great strides in stem cell gene therapy research by transferring a new gene to cancer patients, via their own stem cells, with the ultimate goal of being able to use stronger chemotherapy treatment with less severe side effects. Under this protocol, MGMT, a drug-resistance gene, is added into purified hematopoietic stem cells to protect these cells from the damage of chemotherapy regimens.

In one of 24 presentations by Ireland Cancer Center researchers at the annual American Society of Hematology meeting, Stanton Gerson, MD, and colleagues presented that eight patients were enrolled on the trial and six were infused with their own stem cells which were engineered to carry the MGMT gene. In three patients, stem cells carrying the gene were identified in their blood or bone marrow. In one patient, stem cells carrying the gene were detected up to 28 weeks after their administration. This significant finding has never been reported before with this gene and drug combination.

This study is the first to show the success of treatment with evidence that stem cells now carry the new gene, says Dr. Gerson, Director of the Ireland Cancer Center and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, who spearheaded the Phase I study along with a team of researchers. These patients show the success of treatment with evidence that their stem cells now carry the new genes. This is a breakthrough V the first time selection with MGMT has been shown to occur in patients.

Preclinical animal research, conducted by Dr. Gerson and his colleagues, has shown that the gene G156A-MGMT can provide stem cells with very high levels of drug resistance, compared to normal stem cells not carrying the gene. In the Phase I trial for patients with advanced malignancies, researchers collected peripheral blood stem cells from patients and exposed them to a retrovirus containing the G156A-MGMT gene.

In addition to this promising research, Ireland Cancer Center scientists presented 24 oral and poster presentations at ASH. The breadth and depth of this innovative hematologic research at the Ireland Cancer Center are outstanding, says Alvin Schmaier, MD, Chief of Hematology/Oncology at UHCMC and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Our faculty is making tremendous advances in these fields which is reflected in their being chosen for oral and poster presentations.

The presentations include:

  • Dr. Hillard Lazarus and colleagues presented significant findings that treatment with Rituximab before transplantation results in cure rate and overall survival in patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation for Diffuse Large B-Cell lymphoma.

  • Dr. Lazarus and colleagues of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) presented data that show that Imatninib (Gleevec) does not change outcomes on patients with Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

  • Dr. Lazarus presented an assessment of data over 30 years regarding acute leukemia and its management. He found that all avenues lead to stem cell transplantations. His team provided this assessment of a whole host of entities that provide leukemia care.

  • Dr. Jonathan Kenyon and colleagues found that normal individuals over age 50 begin to show evidence that genetic mutations are accumulating in marrow stem cells. This finding might be the key underlying the increased risk of anemias, myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia in older individuals.

  • Dr. Kevin Buntings laboratory gave two important presentations on how intracellular STAT5 (an intracellular signaling protein) influences normal pathologic hematopoiesis (blood cell formation) and stem cell engraftment.

  • Dr. Shigemi Matsuyama and colleagues presented a novel way of treating chemotherapy -induced thrombocytopenia (decrease in number of platelets in the blood) using Bax Inhibiting Peptides to rescue the damaged cells.

  • Dr. Keith McCrae and colleagues presented that 2 glycoprotein is a cofactor in the process that dissolves blood clots through the use of the medical agent tPA.


'/>"/>

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
216-844-5158
University Hospitals of Cleveland
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Green tea boosts production of detox enzymes, rendering cancerous chemicals harmless
2. A study by the MUHC and McGill University opens a new door to understanding cancer
3. ESF EURYI award winner aims to stop cancer cells reading their own DNA
4. Protein chatter linked to cancer activation
5. Newly created cancer stem cells could aid breast cancer research
6. Western diet linked to increased risk of colon cancer recurrence
7. Obesity and lack of exercise could enhance the risk of pancreatic cancer
8. Low levels of key protein may indicate pancreatic cancer risk
9. Birth records hold pancreatic cancer clue
10. Many parents at-risk for cancer disclose genetic test results to children
11. A new radiation therapy treatment developed for head and neck cancer patients
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/21/2016)... 21, 2016 NuData Security announced today that ... of principal product architect and that Jon ... customer development. Both will report directly to ... moves reflect NuData,s strategic growth in its product ... customer demand and customer focus values. ...
(Date:6/9/2016)... June 9, 2016 Paris ... Teleste,s video security solution to ensure the safety of people ... during the major tournament Teleste, an international ... and services, announced today that its video security solution will ... to back up public safety across the country. The system ...
(Date:6/2/2016)... Perimeter Surveillance & Detection Systems, ... Infrastructure, Support & Other Service  The latest ... comprehensive analysis of the global Border Security market ... of $17.98 billion in 2016. Now: In ... in software and hardware technologies for advanced video surveillance. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... release of its second eBook, “Clinical Trials Patient Recruitment and Retention Tips.” Partnering ... retention in this eBook by providing practical tips, tools, and strategies for clinical ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 A person commits ... the crime scene to track the criminal down. ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses DNA evidence to ... Sound far-fetched? It,s not. The FDA has ... to support investigations of foodborne illnesses. Put as simply as ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June, 23, 2016  The Biodesign Challenge ... envision new ways to harness living systems and biotechnology, ... Art (MoMA) in New York City ... 130 participating students, showcased projects at MoMA,s Celeste Bartos ... Paola Antonelli , MoMA,s senior curator of architecture and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Durham, NC (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... Odense University Hospital in Denmark detail how a patient who developed lymphedema after being ... (fat) tissue. The results could change the paradigm for dealing with this debilitating, frequent ...
Breaking Biology Technology: