Navigation Links
Iowa State researchers develop technology for early detection of viruses
Date:10/30/2007

AMES, Iowa -- Iowa State University researchers have developed a technology that detects a single molecule of the virus associated with cervical cancer in women.

Thats a significant improvement over the current test for the human papillomavirus, said Edward Yeung, an Iowa State Distinguished Professor and the Robert Allen Wright Chair in Chemistry who led the research team that developed the new test. The current test, the Nobel Prize-winning polymerase chain reaction technique, requires 10 to 50 virus molecules for detection.

We are always interested in detecting smaller and smaller amounts of material at lower and lower concentrations, Yeung said. Detecting lower levels means earlier diagnosis.

The discovery by Yeung, whos also a senior chemist and deputy program director for the U.S. Department of Energys Ames Laboratory at Iowa State; Jiangwei Li, an Iowa State doctoral student; and Ji-Young Lee, a former Iowa State doctoral student; will be published in the Nov. 1 issue of the journal Analytical Chemistry.

Their work was funded by a five-year, $950,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health with additional support from The Robert Allen Wright Endowment for Excellence at Iowa State.

The project advanced just as human papillomavirus made national headlines. In June of 2006, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a vaccine developed to prevent cervical cancer, precancerous lesions and genital warts caused by four types of the virus. The vaccine has been approved for females ages 9 to 26.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports the human papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. The agency estimates about 6.2 million Americans are infected every year and over half of all sexually active Americans are infected at some time in their lives.

Yeung said single molecule detection of the virus could help women and families decide to get vaccinated. He said vaccines administered after such early detection could still have time to stop the virus.

The new detection technology improves current technology by eliminating a step to amplify DNA samples for testing. Although the current test is efficient and well understood, the amplification can cause small contaminants to create test errors.

Yeungs single molecule spectroscopy technique involves creating chemical reagents that recognize and fluorescently tag the genetic sequence of the human papillomavirus. Test samples pass through a laser beam that lights the tags. Cameras capture the images for computer analysis.

The research team tested the technique using samples from normal Pap smears. They also spiked some of those samples with the virus to make sure the tests picked up known amounts of the virus.

Although this test concentrated on detecting the human papillomavirus, Yeung said it should detect HIV, avian flu and other viruses as well.

Will the technology make it to medical labs?

Yeung -- who helped start CombiSep Inc. in 1999 to develop and market chemical separation instruments for pharmaceutical and life sciences research (the company merged with Advanced Analytical Technologies Inc. of Ames late last year) -- said he wont be directly involved in taking the detection technology to market. But he said companies have expressed some interest in licensing and developing the technology.

As that project moves on, Yeung will continue looking for ways to detect chemical targets at the smallest limits. He said the next challenge is to figure out how to detect single molecules of proteins.


'/>"/>

Contact: Edward Yeung
yeung@ameslab.gov
515-294-8062
Iowa State University  
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Mitochondrial DNA mutations play significant role in prostate cancer
2. Weizmann Institute scientists develop a new approach for directing treatment to metastasized prostate cancer in the bones.
3. First-ever Compounds To Target Only Metastatic Cells Are Highly Effective Against Breast, Prostate, And Colon Cancers
4. NC State scientist finds soft tissue in T. rex bones
5. Estrogen-like Component of Plastic Stimulates Growth of Certain Prostate Cancer Cells
6. Test for early detection of prostate cancer shows promise
7. Major new UNC-based drinking water study suggests pregnancy fears may be overstated
8. Disease diagnosis, bioengineering covered at state nano summit
9. U-M researchers identify new blood test for prostate cancer
10. U-M scientists say fused genes trigger the development of prostate cancer
11. K-State professors discover enzyme responsible for creation of a beetles hard shell
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Iowa State researchers develop technology for early detection of viruses
(Date:12/8/2016)... PUNE, India , Dec. 8, 2016 Market Research ... and Service Market. The global Mobile Biometric Security and Service Market ... period 2016 to 2022. Market Highlights: ... , , ... fast pace due to the increasing need of authentication and security ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... 7, 2016 According to a new market research report ... (Facial Expression, Voice Recognition), Service, Application Area, End User, And Region - Global ... from USD 6.72 Billion in 2016 to USD 36.07 Billion by 2021, at ... Continue Reading ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
(Date:12/7/2016)...   Avanade is helping Williams Martini Racing, ... history, exploit biometric data in order to critically analyse ... competitive edge against their rivals after their impressive, record-breaking ... has worked with Williams during the 2016 season to ... rate, breathing rate, temperature and peak acceleration) for key ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/18/2017)... Jan. 18, 2017  Market Research Future published a half-cooked research ... expected to grow at a CAGR of 12% during the period ... ... to the abnormal cell division without any control. These abnormal cells ... them. These cancer cells can spread to other parts of the ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... Jan. 17, 2017  An international team of ... and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre/University of ... an unmet health need affecting nearly one in ... Clinical Investigation, their results identify small molecule drugs ... reverse neuronal injury in animal models of metabolic, ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... , Jan. 17, 2017 ... coaching, is the first to offer fully Spanish ... Noom,s Spanish diabetes prevention and ... reach and accessibility of lifestyle interventions among Hispanic ... these conditions. Noom,s robust food database, program-specific curriculum ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... ... at the 2016 annual meeting of the North American Spine Society (NASS)1 ... patients in the majority of cases, when PEEK-OPTIMA™ HA Enhanced is used ...
Breaking Biology Technology: