Navigation Links
Invention helps students learn surgical techniques before operating on patients
Date:11/19/2010

FORT COLLINS - In the last 50 years, modern medicine has made astounding advances in surgery, yet many of today's veterinary and human medicine students still hone basic surgical and suturing skills on carpet pads and pig's feet before transitioning to a live patient. An invention by Colorado State University veterinarians provides students with artificial body parts that look, feel, behave, and even bleed just like real skin, muscles and vessels.

The artificial replicas of sections of human and animal bodies -- such as an abdominal wall -- give students a realistic learning environment that will bridge the gap between classroom lectures and procedures such as surgical cuts and sutures on real human or animal patients.

"It is a significant, stressful leap for medical and veterinary students from the classroom to the surgery suite," said Dr. Dean Hendrickson, a veterinarian and director of CSU's Veterinary Teaching Hospital and one of the inventors. "Industry standards for training sometimes actually teach incorrect techniques, or skills that don't translate into real-world situations, so students don't have the ability to realistically prepare for surgery before a live patient. These artificial simulations help students master their technique, dexterity and confidence before they operate for the first time on a person or someone's pet."

The artificial tissues consist of layers of silicone that closely simulate skin, connective tissue and muscle. Built into the silicone are realistically placed and sized "blood vessels" that are connected to an artificial blood source that supplies the tissue with realistic bleeding. For example, students practicing sutures will experience blood coming into a wound or incision from both sides of the tissue at realistic locations and rates.

Some models are colored realistically, such as a brown-skinned abdominal wall of a horse, with white layers and red layers representing muscles and tissues. However, students also may use simulated tissue in translucent material so they can better view and understand, for example, suture patterns from a three-dimensional perspective while learning correct stitches.

"Our hope is that, with this model, we can begin to help students build better skills that will make for better outcomes," said Dr. Fausto Bellezzo, a co-creator of the technology with Hendrickson. Bellezzo is also a veterinarian and researcher at CSU's Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

The creators are working with CSU Ventures to identify investors and partners to advance development of the model for teaching animal and human medicine. CSU Ventures is a subsidiary corporation of the Colorado State University Research Foundation, a private, non-profit foundation that helps the university move technologies from the university into the commercial sector. The foundation has filed a provisional patent for the technology.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dell Rae Moellenberg
dellrae.moellenberg@colostate.edu
970-491-6009
Colorado State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New invention could improve treatment for children with water on the brain
2. Tel Aviv University invention busts dust
3. UGA licenses invention that kills food-borne pathogens in minutes
4. Virus component helps improve gene expression without harming plant
5. NJIT professor helps make case in Science for better biodiversity
6. Yale scientist helps pinpoint threats to life in worlds rivers
7. Location Labs Helps Power Finspheres New Fraud Detection Product
8. Notre Dame researcher helps discover walking properties of bacteria
9. Drug that helps adults addicted to opioid drugs also relieves withdrawal symptoms in newborns
10. UNH researcher helps identify key reproductive hormone in oldest vertebrate
11. Surprise: Scientists discover that inflammation helps to heal wounds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/10/2016)... February 10, 2016 ... to 2016 iris recognition market report, combined ... is more widely accepted for border control. ... fingerprint and iris recognition technology in a ... avoid purchasing two individual biometrics devices. ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... -- Aware, Inc. (NASDAQ: AWRE ), a leading supplier of ... quarter and year ended December 31, 2015.  ... 2015 was $6.9 million, an increase of 61% compared to $4.3 ... fourth quarter of 2015 was $2.6 million compared to $0.2 million ... --> Higher revenue and operating income in the ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... 9, 2016 Vigilant Solutions announces today that an ... to develop a lead in a difficult homicide case. The ... to locate the suspect vehicle. Due to the ongoing investigation, ... been omitted at the agency,s request. --> ... "Our victim was found deceased at an intersection here in ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... - BioAmber Inc. (NYSE: BIOA ), a leader ... & Co. Ltd., its partner in the ... an additional CDN$25 million in the joint venture for ... to 40%.  Mitsui will also play a stronger role ... Sarnia , providing dedicated resources alongside BioAmber,s ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , February 10, 2016 Early-career researchers ... , Peru , Uganda and ... life-enhancing work in health and nutrition   Indonesia ... Uganda and Yemen are being ... and epidemiology. They are also celebrated for mentoring young women scientists who ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... , Feb. 10, 2016  The Maryland House ... , has announced that University of Maryland School of ... MBA and University of Maryland Medical System President and ... the "Speaker,s Medallion," the highest honor given to the ... Delegates. Dean Reece and Mr. Chrencik ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Feb. 10, 2016 NX Prenatal Inc., a ... NeXosome® technology for early warning of adverse pregnancy ... recent study by Dr. Thomas McElrath ... Maternal Fetal Medicine,s (SMFM) annual meeting held in ... , 2016.  The presentation reported initial positive top-line ...
Breaking Biology Technology: