Navigation Links
Intelligent design: Engineered protein fragment blocks the AIDS virus from entering cells
Date:3/31/2011

In what could be a potential breakthrough in the battle against AIDS and a major development in the rational design of new drugs, scientists have engineered a new protein that prevents the virus from entering cells. This protein is based on a naturally occurring protein in the body that protects cells from viruses, except the man-made version does not cause inflammation and other side effects at the dosages needed to inhibit AIDS. This discovery was published in the April 2011 issue of The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org).

"This is science fiction made reality. These researchers took a protein apart and removed the portion that causes harm, then stabilized and modified the section that has a therapeutic effect," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "Not only is this good news for people with AIDS, it's good news for all of us as this research paves the way for similar work for many, many other illnesses."

The protein fragment is based on a naturally occurring protein called RANTES, which is part of the body's immune system. RANTES naturally defends the body against HIV/AIDS, but cannot be used as a drug or drug candidate because it has several other biological effects which could cause harmful inflammation. After examining the precise molecular structure of the RANTES protein, the researchers discovered that only a small fragment of the RANTES protein is actually responsible for blocking HIV entry into cells. From there, they dissected the desired section of the RANTES protein and worked to stabilize it without compromising its protective effects. After several sequential steps of molecular refinement and some virtual modeling, the researchers created a peptide with very high potency against HIV, with possible benefits for treating inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and lupus, as well as the prevention of transplant rejection.

"We're finally able to design smart anti-HIV drugs aimed at the right target. That's because scientists have spent decades figuring out the molecular details of how the virus enters cells, and the exact chemical structures involved," Weissmann added. "As the Renaissance sculptors wrought art from crude marble, today's molecular engineers today use intelligent design to create life-saving chemical masterpieces."


'/>"/>

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Engineers create intelligent molecules that seek-and-destroy diseased cells
2. Intelligent people have unnatural preferences and values that are novel in human evolution
3. UI researchers analyze implications of intelligent design for human behavior
4. Innovative research reawakens human memories through intelligent textiles
5. Engineered pig stem cells bridge the mouse-human gap
6. Genetically engineered mice yield clues to knocking out cancer
7. First genetically-engineered malaria vaccine to enter human trials
8. Engineered tobacco plants have more potential as a biofuel
9. Bioengineered materials promote the growth of functional vasculature, new study shows
10. Genetically engineered tobacco plant cleans up environmental toxin
11. Genetically engineered crops benefit many farmers, but the technology needs proper management to remain effective
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 UBM,s Advanced Design and ... will feature emerging and evolving technology through its 3D ... will run alongside the expo portion of the event ... and demonstrations focused on trending topics within 3D printing ... and manufacturing event will take place June 13-15, 2017 at ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, a globally-recognized leader ... today announced that it has been awarded a ... Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation Presentation Attack Detection ... "Innovation has been a driving force within Crossmatch ... allow us to innovate and develop new technologies ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... 11, 2017 No two people are ... the New York University Tandon School of Engineering ... found that partial similarities between prints are common ... mobile phones and other electronic devices can be ... vulnerability lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/15/2017)... 2017 After spending the past two years building a ... collection, GeneFo now offers this platform to healthcare stakeholders (hospitals, foundations, ... adherence, and data collection vis a vis their members, under their ... launch of this offer. ... ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... ... August 15, 2017 , ... Kenall, a leader ... designed to stay tightly sealed and perform efficiently for years. The downlights are ... listings just aren't enough, such as: hospitals; behavioral health facilities; cleanrooms; containment areas; ...
(Date:8/14/2017)... ... 14, 2017 , ... Opal Kelly, a leading producer of ... announced the release of SYZYGY™, a new open standard for connecting high-performance peripherals ... compact, low cost, low pin-count, high-performance connectivity solution between FPGAs and single-purpose hardware ...
(Date:8/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “There is an increasing consumer call for ... ingredients,” said Matt Hundt, President of Third Wave Bioactives. “Combining the strong discovery ... of Biorigin will allow us to bring truly novel fermented ingredient technologies to ...
Breaking Biology Technology: