Navigation Links
Insulin may reduce several inflammatory factors induced by bacterial infection
Date:9/8/2010

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Treating intensive care patients who develop life-threatening bacterial infections, or septicemia, with insulin potentially could reduce their chances of succumbing to the infection, if results of a new preliminary study can be replicated in a larger study.

A paper published online ahead of print in Diabetes Care reports that insulin lowered the amount of inflammation and oxidative stress in study participants who had been injected with a common bacteria, or endotoxin, known as LPS (lipopolysaccharide).

The study was conducted by University at Buffalo endocrinologists at Kaleida Health's Diabetes-Endocrinology Center of Western New York.

LPS, found in the outer membrane of various gram-negative bacteria, is known to increase the ability of the bacteria to cause hemorrhage, necrosis of the kidneys and shock, especially in immune-compromised patients.

The study involved 19 healthy subjects who were injected after an overnight fast with a dose of the endotoxin based on their weight. After the endotoxin injection, 10 participants were infused with insulin (plus dextrose to maintain normal glucose levels), and nine received saline to mimic the insulin infusion.

The infusions continued for six hours following the endotoxin injections. Participants then ate a 900 calorie meal and ate nothing else until the following morning.

Researchers monitored the subjects' temperature, pulse, blood pressure, headaches, body aches and chills for 24 hours following the endotoxin injection. Blood samples were collected one hour before the injection, at the time of injection and at one, two, four, six and 24 hours afterwards.

Monitoring showed that the endotoxin raised body temperature by three degrees -- from 98 to a peak of 101.3 at the four-hour mark, and produced body aches and headaches, which peaked between one and two hours. Results showed that insulin reduced the body-aches score but had no effect on temperature,

In addition, the endotoxin induced a rapid rise in several destructive and inflammatory factors, including reactive oxygen species (free radicals) and products of nitric oxide and fat metabolism. The insulin infusion led to total elimination of several pro-inflammatory factors and to a significant reduction in generation of reactive oxygen species and the products of fat metabolism.

Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, UB distinguished professor of medicine and senior author on the study, says this study confirms the expectations arising out of the researchers' initial discovery of the anti-inflammatory effect of insulin.

"This study lays the foundation for further studies based on insulin infusion and the normalization of blood glucose concentrations in patients with endotoxemia and septicemia," says Dandona.

"Our endocrinology group demonstrated previously that insulin also has anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective effects in patients who had a heart attack, and we currently are conducting a study on the potential beneficial effects of insulin on acute stroke.

"Clearly, insulin may emerge with roles beyond those conceived when it was discovered in 1921 as a metabolic hormone, and has since been used for the treatment of diabetes to lower and control blood glucose concentrations," Dandona notes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Lois Baker
ljbaker@buffalo.edu
716-645-4606
University at Buffalo
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. For insulin sensitive overweight patients, 1 session of exercise improves metabolic health
2. Decreasing insulin resistance prevents obesity-related cardiovascular damage
3. Findings show insulin -- not genes -- linked to obesity
4. Nanodiamonds deliver insulin for wound healing
5. Pitt study finds molecular link between insulin resistance and inflammation
6. Diabetes advance: Researchers find gene that causes resistance to insulin
7. CHEO RI study uses sophisticated genetic engineering to improve insulin-producing beta cells
8. New gene variants associated with glucose, insulin levels, some with diabetes risk
9. Scripps research scientists find new link between insulin and core body temperature
10. Structure of insulins docking point identified
11. Insulin-like signal needed to keep stem cells alive in adult brain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/15/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Bioinformatics ... ... The global bioinformatics market is projected ... in 2016, growing at a CAGR of 21.1% during the forecast ... by the growing demand for nucleic acid and protein sequencing, increasing ...
(Date:11/14/2016)... SANTA CLARA, Calif. , Nov. 14, ... of the biometric identification market, Frost & ... Global Frost & Sullivan Award for Visionary ... leading player in the biometric identification market ... a multi-modal verification solution for instant, seamless, ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... , June 22, 2016  The American College of ... Trade Show Executive Magazine as one of the fastest-growing ... May 25-27 at the Bellagio in Las Vegas ... the highest percentage of growth in each of the following ... exhibiting companies and number of attendees. The 2015 ACMG Annual ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/7/2016)... Baltimore, Maryland (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 ... ... platform for digital pathology, announced today a new service to enable rapid migration ... in data upload has remained one of the factors limiting adoption of digital ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... /PRNewswire/ - SQI Diagnostics Inc. ("SQI" or the "Company") (TSX-V: SQD; OTCQX: ... and fiscal year ended September 30, 2016. ... , , ... diagnostics company that develops and commercializes proprietary technologies and products for ... Achieved revenues of $1.4 million more than tripling prior years revenue. ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... Symbios Technologies, Inc. ... the company has engaged in a collaborative research partnership with Colorado State University ... Office of the Vice President for Research. This agreement is designed to further ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... , Dec. 6, 2016  SRI International ... $150 million from the National Institutes of Health,s ... the Division of AIDS (NIAID-DAIDS) to support the ... non-vaccine pre-exposure (PreP) agents. Under the seven-year contract, ... product development services for candidate HIV-prevention products that ...
Breaking Biology Technology: