Navigation Links
Innate immune system proteins attack bacteria by triggering bacterial suicide mechanisms
Date:5/23/2011

GARY, Ind. A group of proteins that act as the body's built-in line of defense against invading bacteria use a molecular trick to induce bacteria to destroy themselves, researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine have determined. The research could point the way toward new anti-bacterial treatments that could take on bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.

The proteins, called Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs), are able to detect and target bacteria because bacteria are unique in having peptidoglycan polymers in their cellular walls. However, the mechanism by which PGRPs are able to kill bacteria had not been determined.

A research team led by Roman Dziarski, Ph.D., professor of microbiology and immunology at Indiana University School of Medicine Northwest, reported May 22 in the advance online edition of the journal Nature Medicine that the PGRPs are able to induce a suicide response in the targeted bacteria.

The PGRPs accomplish the mission by binding to specific sites in bacterial cell walls in ways that exploit a bacterial defense mechanism known as protein-sensing two-component systems. These systems, which normally enable the bacteria to detect and eject malformed proteins, interpret the PGRPs as just such malformed proteins. Unable to dislodge the PGRPs, the bacteria then activate a suicide response, the researchers said.

This approach is different than those employed by other anti-bacterial mechanisms, such as the immune system's white blood cells, said Dziarski.

"This could be a target to develop new anti-bacterial applications," Dziarski said.

Dziarski and colleague Dipika Gupta, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Indiana University School of Medicine Northwest, first cloned the PGRP genes in 2001. The PGRP genes, which are found in species ranging from insects to mammals, are part of the body's innate immune system, in contrast to the mechanisms that learn and develop new immune responses to infections over time.

The PGRP proteins are normally expressed in phagocytic cells in blood and on body surface areas such as skin, mouth, intestine and other tissues that have direct or indirect contact with the external world, Dziarski noted. In some tissues it appears that the PGRPs help maintain a healthy relationship between the body and certain beneficial bacteria. Some studies have indicated that the loss of the PGRP proteins may lead to inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting that the research reported Monday could point the way to new approaches to target such problems, Dziarski said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Eric Schoch
eschoch@iupui.edu
317-274-7722
Indiana University School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. A new player in the innate immunity game?
2. New discovery suggests our lungs are innately prone to silicosis and related diseases
3. New research shows how disease-causing parasite gets around human innate immunity
4. Papillomavirus silences innate immune response
5. Brain innately separates living and non-living objects for processing
6. NIH funds $9.5 million for research on HIV and the human innate immune system
7. Facial expressions of emotion are innate, not learned, says new study
8. Genetic finding implicates innate immune system in major cause of blindness
9. Understanding a bacterial immune system 1 step at a time
10. Study finds therapies using induced pluripotent stem cells could encounter immune rejection problems
11. For puzzling childhood immune disorder, gene research opens door to first diagnostic test
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Innate immune system proteins attack bacteria by triggering bacterial suicide mechanisms
(Date:5/16/2017)... , May 16, 2017  Veratad Technologies, LLC ( ... online age and identity verification solutions, announced today they ... Conference 2017, May 15 thru May 17, 2017, in ... and International Trade Center. Identity impacts ... and in today,s quickly evolving digital world, defining identity ...
(Date:4/18/2017)...  Socionext Inc., a global expert in SoC-based imaging and computing ... M820, which features the company,s hybrid codec technology. A demonstration utilizing ... Inc., will be showcased during the upcoming Medtec Japan at Tokyo ... Las Vegas Convention Center April 24-27. ... Click here for an image ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... offering. ... market to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during the period ... has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs ... growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... Personal eye wash is a basic first ... eye at a time. So which eye do you rinse first if a dangerous substance ... Plum Duo Eye Wash with its unique dual eye piece. , “Whether its ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 11, 2017 , ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the main causes ... each year. Especially those living in larger cities are affected by air pollution related ... the most pollution-affected countries globally - decided to take action. , “I knew I ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 10, 2017 , ... For the second time in three ... Mentoring Award. Representatives of the FirstHand program travelled to Washington, D.C. Tuesday, October ... US2020’s mission is to change the trajectory of STEM education in America by ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 10, 2017 , ... The Pittcon Program Committee is pleased ... scientists who have made outstanding contributions to analytical chemistry and applied spectroscopy. Each ... leading conference and exposition for laboratory science, which will be held February 26-March ...
Breaking Biology Technology: