Navigation Links
Individuals vary their immune response according to age, sex and the costs
Date:9/10/2008

Is it always good to respond maximally when pathogens or disease strike, or should individuals vary their immune response to balance immediate and future costs? This is the question evolutionary physiologists Oliver Love, Katrina Salvante, James Dale, and Tony Williams asked when they examined how a simple immune response varied at different life stages across the life-span of individual zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), in a study published in the September issue of the American Naturalist.

When transitioning from nest-bound juveniles to adults, female immune responses matured slowly whereas males showed dramatic variation potentially due to the costs of molting into their colorful sexually dimorphic plumage. Adult males showed little variation in immune response despite changes in resource quality. Likewise, when females laid eggs under high-quality resource conditions, immune responses were also consistent with those during non-breeding and similar to male responses. However, when laying on reduced resources females reduced their immune response and their reproductive output consistent with a facultative (resource-driven) effect of reproductive effort on immunity. Moreover, even under high-resource conditions during the chick-rearing stage mothers showed reduced immune responses compared to fathers suggesting a residual energetic cost of egg-laying. Perhaps most importantly, immune responses of juveniles of both sexes did not predict their subsequent adult responses. Immune responses of adult females were only predictable when the quality of the environment remained constant; as soon as conditions deteriorated, individual females required flexibility in both the immune and reproductive systems. However, the degree of flexibility came at a cost as only individuals with high immune responses as non-breeders had the capacity to reduce responses when times became tough. These results underlie the fact that immunity is a highly plastic trait that can be modulated in a sex- and context-dependent manner. Given the need for individual flexibility in the immune system, this suggests that an immune response at one stage may provide limited information about immune response at future stages.


'/>"/>

Contact: Patricia Morse
pmorse@press.uchicago.edu
773-702-0446
University of Chicago Press Journals
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Caltech neurobiologists discover individuals who hear movement
2. Jingle bells not merry for tone-deaf individuals
3. How plants fine tune their natural chemical defenses
4. Old before their time? Aging in flies under natural vs. laboratory conditions
5. Codeine not safe for all breastfeeding moms and their babies
6. Parents shape whether their children learn to eat fruits and vegetables
7. Guilt on their hands: tiny tags could help to solve and deter gun crime
8. Male fish deceive rivals about their top mate choice
9. Syracuse University scientists discover how some bacteria may steal iron from their human hosts
10. Ultrasonic frogs can tune their ears to different frequencies
11. Pregnant mice block out unwelcome admirers to protect their pups
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Individuals vary their immune response according to age, sex and the costs
(Date:12/15/2016)... , Dec. 15, 2016 ... driving experience, health wellness and wellbeing (HWW), ... one in three new passenger vehicles begin ... recognition, gesture recognition, heart beat monitoring, brain ... monitoring, facial monitoring, and pulse detection. These ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... , Dec. 8, 2016 Market Research Future published ... Market. The global Mobile Biometric Security and Service Market is expected ... to 2022. Market Highlights: ... , , Mobile Biometric ... due to the increasing need of authentication and security from unwanted ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... 7, 2016   Avanade is helping Williams ... teams in history, exploit biometric data in order to ... maintain the competitive edge against their rivals after their ... Avanade has worked with Williams during the 2016 ... data (heart rate, breathing rate, temperature and peak acceleration) ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... Total ... successfully implanted SpineFrontier’s A-CIFT™ Solofuse-P™. The operation took place on Wednesday, January 11, ... The procedure was an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion on a 42 year ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... MYOLYN, which creates ... has submitted a 510(k) to the FDA, requesting clearance of the MyoCycle Home ... stimulation (FES) technology. , The submission marks a major milestone for the ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 18, 2017 , ... ... January 24th, 2017, to sell research and genetic testing lab equipment from two ... in the Northwest and Northeast regions of the United States. This 1-day online ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... Jan. 18, 2017 Shareholder rights law firm ... whether the board members of CoLucid Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... connection with the proposed sale of the Company to ... that develops small molecules for the acute treatment of ... it had signed a definitive merger agreement with Eli ...
Breaking Biology Technology: