Navigation Links
India's shrinking animal ark needs more parks, corridors
Date:3/10/2010

A study on the past extinction of large mammals in India by the Wildlife Conservation Society, Duke University, and other groups has found that country's protected area system and human cultural tolerance for some species are key to conserving the subcontinent's tigers, elephants, and other large mammals.

According to the study, the long-term survival of many large species in the midst of rapid economic growth will require improving existing protected areas and establishing new protected areas and corridors.

The paperrecently published in the Proceedings of the Royal Societyis authored by: Krithi K. Karanth of Duke & Columbia University; James D. Nichols and James E. Hines of the USGS Patuxent Research Center; K. Ullas Karanth of the Wildlife Conservation Society; and Norman L. Christensen of Duke University.

"This study provides us with a roadmap for next steps for conservation in India," said Colin Poole, executive director of the Wildlife Conservation Society's Asia Program. "As India develops into a world economic power, it is critical that conservation planning is part of that expansion."

"India's rich diversity of wildlife is one of the country's great assets," said Krithi K. Karanth, the study's lead author. "Our work highlights the perilous state of wildlife in India and conservation priorities must help conserve the nation's natural heritage."

The researchers created models to estimate extinction probability for 25 large mammal species, determining current species distributions along with more than 30,000 historical records from natural history, taxidermy and museum records dating back 200 years. The models were used to gauge how factors such as protected areas, forest cover, elevation, and human demographics, and cultural attitudes impact extinction predictions.

The results of the analysis found that all 25 species would experience some level of local extinction due to a variety of factors such as habitat loss and human population growth and development. The study results confirmed that species do benefit from protected areas, especially large carnivores such as tigers and other forest-dwelling animals such as Sambar deer. The species with the highest probable rates of extinction were large-bodied animals such as the wild buffalo (66 percent), habitat specialists such as the goat-like Nilgiri tahr (71 percent) and the swamp deer (90 percent), and rare species had higher probabilities of extinction such as the Asiatic lions of Gir Forest (96 percent).

Factors such as human densities did increase the probability of extinction for many species with the exception of adaptable animals such as wild pigs, jackals, and blackbuck.

The authors point out that many species, including ones that exist outside of protected areas (mouse deer, four-horned antelope, sloth bear, wolf and others) and species that now occupy a tiny remnant of former ranges (gaur, elephant, rhino, Asiatic lion, tigers, etc.) will require new protected areas to ensure their persistence.

"Our results highlight the need for an expansion of conservation planning to complement land use decisions and development," added Karanth.


'/>"/>

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Trial of new treatment for advanced melanoma shows rapid shrinking of tumors
2. Shrinking Bylot Island glaciers tell story of climate change
3. Jupiters shrinking red spot
4. Shrinking carbon footprints
5. VIV Europe: COST workshop on animal nutrition and health -- benefiting from research networks
6. Hormone study gives scientists a sense of how animals bond
7. The bigger the animal, the stiffer the shoes
8. French and Spanish researchers develop a natural alternative to antibiotics in animal feed
9. Plant buffers may limit spread of antibiotics in animal waste
10. Animal models that help translate regenerative therapies from bench to bedside
11. Animals cope with climate change at the dinner table
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/22/2016)... June 22, 2016  The American College of Medical Genetics ... Executive Magazine as one of the fastest-growing trade shows ... at the Bellagio in Las Vegas . ... percentage of growth in each of the following categories: net ... and number of attendees. The 2015 ACMG Annual Meeting was ...
(Date:6/21/2016)... British Columbia , June 21, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... appointed to the new role of principal product ... been named the director of customer development. Both ... NuData,s chief technical officer. The moves reflect NuData,s ... teams in response to high customer demand and ...
(Date:6/15/2016)... , June 15, 2016 ... market report titled "Gesture Recognition Market by Application Market - Global ... 2016 - 2024". According to the report, the  global ... billion in 2015 and is estimated to grow ... 48.56 billion by 2024.  Increasing application ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... to an early access program for SmartBiome -- a novel metagenomic deep-sequencing ... simultaneous specific enrichment and detection of hundreds of different genes. The selective ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... Laurel, NJ (PRWEB) , ... December 06, 2016 ... ... white paper on December 1, 2016 asking the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to ... the study of OA, OARSI is concerned about the growing population of OA ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... -- According to a new market research report "Microfluidics ... Application (Genomics, Proteomics, Capillary Electrophoresis, POC, Clinical, Environmental, Drug Delivery) - ... projected to reach USD 8.78 Billion by 2021 from USD 3.65 ... period (2016 to 2021). Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... ... development of precision treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, today announced the validated monoclonal ... the direct neurotoxic effect of prion-like forms of Amyloid beta (Aß) in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: