Navigation Links
Increasing sugar concentration in tomato juice
Date:4/28/2014

TOKYO, JAPAN To increase the sugar concentration and resulting marketability of tomato juice, growers have traditionally used techniques such as subjecting plants to salt and water stresses. In a new study published in HortTechnology (February 2014), Ken Takahata and Hiroyuki Miura from Tokyo University of Agriculture reported on a prototypic method known as "basal wire coiling" that shows potential as a simple and effective method for increasing the sugar concentration in tomato fruit juice.

"We investigated whether coiling wire around the lower part of the plant stems to reduce the capacity of xylem to transport water to the shoot would result in low shoot moisture conditions and increase the sugar concentration of fruit like salt and water stresses," the authors said. They noted that basal wire coiling is less complex than other treatments, such as subjecting tomato plants to salt or water stress, which can require special equipment and techniques.

Takahata and Miura's study involved coiling bonsai wire around the stems of tomato seedlings between the cotyledon node and the first leaf node. "Eleven days after treatment, the stem diameters immediately above the wire coils were markedly greater in treated plants compared with the corresponding stem regions of control plants," they said. The stems of treated plants were less elongated and developed fewer nodes at 39 and 51 days after treatment than did the control plants.

Several months after the application of the treatment, marketable fruit harvested from the first to third trusses of the treated plants had average weights that were 49% to 89% of the weights of fruit from control plants. The juice of fruit from the first to third trusses in the treated plants had soluble solids concentrations of 116% to 120%, sucrose concentrations of 263% to 483%, and fructose and glucose concentrations of 135% to 155%, compared with juice from corresponding control fruit. At 112 days after treatment, the shoots and roots of treated plants had weights that were 58% and 32% of those of control plants, respectively.

"Since basal wire coiling in this experiment markedly suppressed root growth, presumably by impeding photosynthate translocation through the phloem to the roots, we assume that water absorption was also decreased by this treatment," Takahata and Miura wrote. "Furthermore, impeding water transport through the xylem to the upper parts of the plant by this treatment should accelerate a reduction in the moisture content of the shoot."

The results suggested that the decrease in moisture content, minor decrease in photosynthate production, activated sugar translocation, and reduced competition for photosynthates resulting from the basal wire coiling technique could increase sugar concentrations in tomato fruit juice.

Takahata and Miura recommended further studies to determine the practical application of basal wire coiling for tomato production; specifically to identify the appropriate location and time for coiling plants with wire, the optimum width of the wire coil, optimal methods for nutrient and water management, and to calculate the economic impacts for producers and consumers.


'/>"/>

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Surprising pine beetle breeding habits help explain increasing tree damage, says CU study
2. Increasing clarity for medics in suspected physical abuse cases
3. Increasing water scarcity in Californias Bay-Delta will necessitate trade-offs; hard decisions needed to balance various environmental risks
4. Increasing predator-friendly land can help farmers reduce costs
5. Loss of biodiversity increasingly threatens human well-being: UBC, University of Michigan research
6. Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in Arctic coastal seas
7. A Kit for increasing insulin production
8. Environmental concerns increasing infectious disease in amphibians, other animals
9. Increasing drought stress challenges vulnerable hydraulic system of plants, GW professor finds
10. Fire and ice: Wildfires darkening Greenland snowpack, increasing melting
11. Community-based nutrition education shown to be successful in increasing calcium intake
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... BROOKLYN, N.Y. , April 11, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... identical fingerprints, but researchers at the New York ... University College of Engineering have found that partial ... fingerprint-based security systems used in mobile phones and ... previously thought. The vulnerability lies in ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... Allen Institute for Cell Science today announces the launch ... dynamic digital window into the human cell. The website ... deep learning to create predictive models of cell organization, ... suite of powerful tools. The Allen Cell Explorer will ... resources created and shared by the Allen Institute for ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... April 4, 2017   EyeLock LLC , a ... the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has ... the linking of an iris image with a face ... represents the company,s 45 th issued patent. ... very timely given the multi-modal biometric capabilities that have ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/15/2017)... Wisconsin (PRWEB) , ... August 15, 2017 , ... ... a new family of 6” modular downlights designed to stay tightly sealed and ... including areas where damp and wet location listings just aren't enough, such as: ...
(Date:8/15/2017)... ... August 15, 2017 , ... Coffea arabica accounts for ... abiotic factors. During this educational webinar, participants will learn about the importance of ... a better understanding of how genomics is important for coffee breeding improvement. , ...
(Date:8/14/2017)... ... August 14, 2017 , ... Every year, millions of ... the antibody community have recently come together to address this antibody crisis and ... , The team at Thermo Fisher Scientific has arranged ...
(Date:8/14/2017)... ... August 14, 2017 , ... The Conference Forum ... which will take place on September 6, 2017 at the Marriott Copley Place in ... of Experimental Medicine, Informatics, and Regulatory Strategy, Pfizer Innovative Research Lab, Pfizer, who leads ...
Breaking Biology Technology: