Navigation Links
In odd-looking mutant, clues about how maize plants control stem cell number
Date:9/12/2013

Cold Spring Harbor, NY -- In plants, the growth of organs such as roots, leaves and flowers depends upon the activity of meristems. These reservoir-like compartments hold stem cells, which have the ability to develop into various different cell types.

At Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), Professor David Jackson studies naturally occurring mutations in plants to obtain insights about how plants regulate their growth. This work has powerful implications for efforts to increase the yield of basic food crops like maize (or corn, as it is called in North America).

Today, in a paper appearing online in Nature, Jackson and colleagues present first evidence of a functional interaction between an important class of signaling molecule called a G protein, which binds receptors, and an unexpected class of cell-surface receptors.

Working backward from an odd-looking maize mutant called COMPACT PLANT2 (CT2) that develops abnormally enlarged ears a phenomenon called fasciation Jackson, Peter Bommert, Ph.D., and others found this gene to encode a G protein called Gα. Further experiments indicated an unexpected interaction between Gα and a cell-surface receptor that is a part of the CLAVATA signaling pathway, known to control stem cell activation.

The "beginning" and "end" of the CLAVATA signaling pathway were known: receptors at the cell surface are activated by a small, secreted ligand to regulate a transcription factor called WUSCHEL inside the nucleus. The Jackson lab's new research begins to fill in the gaps between these points.

Contrary to prior assumptions based on examples in mammals and yeast, the new research suggests that in plants, Gα, which acts as a signaling switch, can be activated by a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that belongs to a class of cell-surface receptors that pass the cell membrane only a single time.

"The idea that Gα interacts with a single-pass trans membrane receptor called FEA2 is at odds with the dogma that in yeast and mammals, Gα interacts with GPCRs of the type that pass through the membrane seven times 7TM receptors. Further research should indicate whether this is true not only in maize but generally in plants," Jackson says.


'/>"/>

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers look to relatives for clues in quest to develop sources of bioenergy
2. Relative reference: Foxtail millet offers clues for assembling the switchgrass genome
3. Higher pain tolerance in athletes may hold clues for pain management
4. Clues to nervous system evolution found in nerve-less sponge
5. Preserved frogs hold clues to deadly pathogen
6. Remote Siberian lake holds clues to Arctic -- and Antarctic -- climate change
7. Highlighting molecular clues to the link between childhood maltreatment and later suicide
8. Hunting for autisms chemical clues
9. Salt cress genome yields new clues to salt tolerance
10. Gecko feet hold clues to creating bandages that stick when wet
11. A mechanism providing clues for research into pancreatic diabetes is described
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 No two people are believed ... New York University Tandon School of Engineering and ... that partial similarities between prints are common enough ... phones and other electronic devices can be more ... lies in the fact that fingerprint-based authentication systems ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... LONDON , April 4, 2017 KEY ... is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of 25.76% ... neurodegenerative diseases is the primary factor for the growth ... full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4807905/ MARKET INSIGHTS The ... of product, technology, application, and geography. The stem cell ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... March 30, 2017 Trends, opportunities and forecast ... behavioral), by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris recognition, facial recognition, ... others), by end use industry (government and law enforcement, ... and banking, and others), and by region ( ... Asia Pacific , and the Rest ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... ... ... Inc., a development-stage cancer-focused pharmaceutical company advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, ... uses of targeted HPLN (Hybrid Polymerized Liposomal Nanoparticle), a technology developed in ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... Dr. Bob Harman, founder and ... San Diego Rotary Club. The event entitled “Stem Cells and Their ... 300+ attendees. Dr. Harman, DVM, MPVM was joined by two human doctors: Peter ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , Oct. 10, 2017 SomaGenics announced ... the NIH to develop RealSeq®-SC (Single Cell), expected to ... profiling small RNAs (including microRNAs) from single cells using ... highlights the need to accelerate development of approaches to ... "New techniques for measuring levels of ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... The Pittcon Program Committee ... honoring scientists who have made outstanding contributions to analytical chemistry and applied ... the world’s leading conference and exposition for laboratory science, which will be held ...
Breaking Biology Technology: