Navigation Links
Impaired recovery from inflammation linked to Alzheimer's
Date:2/14/2014

New research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that the final stage of the normal inflammatory process may be disrupted in patients with Alzheimer's disease. A study published in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia shows that levels in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of the molecules necessary for tissue recovery through the clearance of harmful inflammatory substances are lower than normal in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The study also showed association between the lower levels of these molecules with impaired memory function.

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, eventually leading to neuronal death associated with an increasing degree of memory impairment. As with other neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's is characterised by an inflammatory process in the brain. Prolonged inflammation with the release of inflammatory and toxic substances can cause further damage and neuronal death.

The inflammatory process normally ends in what is known as resolution. This is an active process regulated by certain molecules, so called specialized pro-resolving mediators, where the tissue is cleared from microorganisms, debris from dead cells via an uptake mechanism (phagocytosis), and where the release of growth factors stimulates tissue repair.

Together with colleagues in the United States, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now shown that the levels of resolution-regulating molecules in the brain and in the cerebrospinal fluid are lower in Alzheimer's disease than normal. The researchers have also shown that the lower levels of these molecules correlate with a lower degree of cognitive function, that is, memory capacity. The results are based on analyses of cerebrospinal fluid from 15 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 20 patients with mild cognitive impairment and 21 control subjects. The researchers also analysed brain tissue from 10 Alzheimer's patients and 10 control subjects.

"Our hypothesis is that stimulation of resolution of inflammation in Alzheimer's disease may result in reduced neuronal death in the brain, and in turn have a beneficial effect in disease progression and cognition. This is an entirely new approach and provides the opportunity to develop new treatment principles for Alzheimer's disease," says Professor Marianne Schultzberg, who led the study at the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society.

In ongoing studies, the researchers are now investigating how the pro-resolving molecules affect neuronal death in cell cultures, and whether treatment in animal experiments with these substances can prevent neurodegeneration and improve memory functions. The pro-resolving molecules identified so far are derivatives of omega-3 fatty acids, which constitute a popular food supple-ment that has been ascribed several health benefits, and have received attention for beneficial effects also on factors related to Alzheimer's disease, in line with the new results described above. In previous studies, the researchers behind these new findings have shown that omega-3 also stimulates cells to take up amyloid-beta, a protein that kills neurons and occurs in the brain in the form of plaques in Alzheimer's disease.


'/>"/>

Contact: Press Office
pressinfo@ki.se
46-852-486-077
Karolinska Institutet
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Impaired recovery of Atlantic cod -- forage fish or other factors?
2. Psychopaths have an impaired sense of smell
3. People with impaired glucose tolerance can show cognitive dysfunction
4. Research breakthrough: Impaired autophagy associated with age-related macular degeneration
5. Impaired cell division leads to neuronal disorder
6. University of Houston study shows BP oil spill hurt marshes, but recovery possible
7. Growth factor in stem cells may spur recovery from MS
8. Stanford scientists find molecule to starve lung cancer and improve ventilator recovery
9. New biofuel process dramatically improves energy recovery
10. After long-ago mass extinction, global warming hindered species recovery
11. Bone marrow stem cells do not improve short-term recovery after heart attack
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Impaired recovery from inflammation linked to Alzheimer's
(Date:4/17/2017)... 2017 NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: NXTD ) ... of its 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K on Thursday April ... ... in the Investor Relations section of the Company,s website at ... at http://www.sec.gov . 2016 Year Highlights: ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... Apr. 11, 2017 Research and Markets has ... report to their offering. ... The global eye tracking market to grow at a CAGR of ... Eye Tracking Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth ... market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... April 5, 2017  The Allen Institute for Cell ... Explorer: a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic digital window into ... data, the first application of deep learning to create ... cell lines and a growing suite of powerful tools. ... these and future publicly available resources created and shared ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/18/2017)... ... May 17, 2017 , ... ... its scientific power by providing investigators access to a high-profile scientific advisory ... the scientific advisory board. “We are committed to offering superior services and ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... ... May 17, 2017 , ... ... varying industries, including food and dairy, munitions, and pharmaceutical/biotech, recently introduced The Revolution ... ease of use. The improvement in technology comes on the heels of HOLLOWAY’s ...
(Date:5/18/2017)... ... 18, 2017 , ... When James Sherley, was notified earlier this year that his company ... Year 2017 by The Silicon Review , he was not surprised as others might ... value, but this recognition by Silicon Valley was particularly meaningful. Our selection ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... , ... May 16, 2017 , ... ... Trademark Office (USPTO) for a wireless electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) acquisition and monitoring ... be integrated into clothing, or secured directly onto the skin, making them significantly ...
Breaking Biology Technology: