Navigation Links
ISU researchers help map first plant-parasitic nematode genome sequence
Date:9/4/2008

AMES, Iowa -- There are numerous plant-parasitic nematodes in the world, but only a handful are responsible for the largest part of an estimated $157 billion in agricultural damage globally every year. Nematodes are small worms that burrow into plant roots and feed off living cells.

Now, Iowa State University researchers have contributed to the release of the annotated genome of one of the most destructive nematodes: Meloidogyne incognita -- the southern root-knot nematode, as reported recently in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

Sequencing the genome is a critical step toward comprehensively understanding how the organism works and may pave the way for research on ways to fight the pest.

"This is considered to be one of, if not the most important plant-parasitic nematode species across the world," said Thomas Baum, professor and chair of plant pathology and head of Iowa State University's contribution to the genome sequence project.

Root-knot nematodes are so important because they can be found almost anywhere in the world on almost any plant, he said. Nematodes are the most abundant animals on earth.

"Many of the nematodes that are really bad pathogens are very specialized on which plant they attack," said Baum. "This nematode has a huge host range. For us nematologists, it is very interesting and challenging to study."

Because the pest is so widespread, many nematologists around the world were eager to help with the project. The lead investigator was Pierre Abad of the Insitut National de Recherche Agronomiquea, a French research group, with help from researchers in Belgium, Holland, Great Britain, Switzerland, and Iowa State University and North Carolina State University in the US.

"Because it is such a worldwide problem, people are eager to contribute," Baum said. "Also, because it is the first plant-parasitic nematode to have its sequence released, people are very excited abou
'/>"/>

Contact: Thomas Baum
tbaum@iastate.edu
515-294-2398
Iowa State University
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify proteins involved in new neurodegenerative syndrome
2. Texas researchers and educators head for Antarctica
3. MGH researchers describe new way to identify, evolve novel enzymes
4. University of Pennsylvania researchers develop formula to gauge risk of disease clusters
5. U of MN researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
6. U of Minnesota researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
7. Researchers discover new strategies for antibiotic resistance
8. Researchers find new taste in fruit flies: carbonated water
9. Binghamton University researchers investigate evolving malaria resistance
10. UIC researchers find promising new targets for antibiotics
11. Researchers develop simple method to create natural drug products
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/10/2014)... JUPITER, FL, July 10, 2014 Amidst the astounding ... of synaptic connections in the brain, how do nerve ... connections to build? How do they coordinate these events ... scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research ... processes, showing that a particular protein plays a far ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... Amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer,s disease, type 2 ... the common trait that proteins aggregate into long ... studies have found that neither the amylin monomer ... New evidence using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy ... aggregation pathway that may explain toxicity, opening a ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... Ore. Nuclear engineers at Oregon State University have ... device that should help people all over the world ... intensity, and whether or not it poses a health ... to public demand following the nuclear incident in Fukushima, ... what level of radiation they were being exposed to ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Scripps Florida scientists shed new light on nerve cell growth 2New technology reveals insights into mechanisms underlying amyloid diseases 2Sophisticated radiation detector designed for broad public use 2Sophisticated radiation detector designed for broad public use 3
... Lee Lovering, Ph.D., School of Biosciences, University of ... Award for his seminal work on the structural ... and modify cell walls in bacteria. Natalie Strynadka, ... Lovering,s work: "his spectacular abilities in structural biology ...
... 2012) Aeras and the Infectious Disease Research Institute ... trial of IDRI,s novel tuberculosis vaccine candidate, ID93 + ... safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of the vaccine candidate in ... by Johnson County Clin-Trials in Lenexa, Kansas, in close ...
... risks posed to people who work with tiny fibres used ... Research into the health risks posed by nanofibres ... has pinpointed the lengths at which these fibres are ... from a range of materials including carbon, are about 1,000 ...
Cached Biology News:The American Society for Microbiology honors Andrew Lovering 2As TB grows more difficult to control, vaccine candidate to prevent disease enters clinical testing 2
(Date:7/10/2014)... lithium-ion batteries that power our laptops and electric vehicles ... single charge with the help of a sponge-like silicon ... replace the graphite traditionally used in one of the ... the energy storage capacity of graphite. A paper describing ... published today in Nature Communications . , "Silicon ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... out for crude 3-D glasses, polarized glasses, and ... basic devices, used to trick the brain into ... rendered obsolete with the introduction of new holography ... TAU doctoral students Yuval Yifat, Michal Eitan, and ... on nanoantennas that could be used for security ...
(Date:7/10/2014)... alliance will see the two universities and NPL collaborate ... business and industry and their complementary academic strengths., Working ... to shape the scientific priorities of the UK. The ... to 300 high-calibre PhD students, will provide a pipeline ... the potential of the Laboratory will be grown through ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... laureate Herbert Kroemer famously observed, referring to the ... where layers of different materials meet. In today,s ... of metal oxides are becoming increasingly prominent, with ... superconductors, ferroelectrics and multiferroics. Realizing the vast potential ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Silicon sponge improves lithium-ion battery performance 2Silicon sponge improves lithium-ion battery performance 3Projecting a 3-dimensional future 2Projecting a 3-dimensional future 3Universities of Surrey and Strathclyde selected as strategic partners in the future operation of the National Physical Laboratory 2Universities of Surrey and Strathclyde selected as strategic partners in the future operation of the National Physical Laboratory 3A deeper look at interfaces 2
... allows up to 50% sucrose reduction while maintaining the sweet taste ... ... CA, July 29, 2008 Senomyx, Inc.,(Nasdaq: SNMX ), a ... flavor ingredients for the food, beverage,and ingredient supply industries, announced today ...
... technology to an,orphan disease, in a unique translational ... July 29 ,ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) ... new collaboration aimed at advancing any potential,application of ... sclerosis,commonly known as Lou Gehrig,s diseases. The new ...
... Zenobia Therapeutics, Inc.,(Zenobia) announced today that ... from The Michael J. Fox Foundation for ... potential to,fundamentally alter the course of Parkinson,s ... Ross of Johns Hopkins University,Zenobia will discover ...
Cached Biology Technology:SENOMYX ANNOUNCES INITIATION OF DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES FOR NEW SUCROSE ENHANCER 2SENOMYX ANNOUNCES INITIATION OF DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES FOR NEW SUCROSE ENHANCER 3SENOMYX ANNOUNCES INITIATION OF DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES FOR NEW SUCROSE ENHANCER 4ALS Therapy Development Institute and California Stem Cell, Inc. Announce Long-Term Scientific Collaboration 2ALS Therapy Development Institute and California Stem Cell, Inc. Announce Long-Term Scientific Collaboration 3Zenobia Therapeutics, Inc. Receives Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research Award for Work on PD-implicated Protein LRRK2 2