Navigation Links
IOF calls for improved strategies to close the treatment gap and reduce future burden of fractures
Date:6/17/2011

It pays to prevent fractures. That's one of the main findings of a landmark report 'Osteoporosis Burden, Healthcare provision and Opportunities in the European Union' newly published in the journal Archives of Osteoporosis. The study, compiled by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) in collaboration with the European Federation of the Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA), calculates the future burden of fractures as a consequence of increasing treatment uptake in the five largest European countries as well as Sweden.

Fragility fractures, which affect as many as one in three women and one in five men over the age of 50, have immense social and health economic consequences. In the six countries studied, an estimated 2.46 million fragility fractures occurred in 2010 (280 fractures per hour). The result is often severe loss of quality of life, long-term disability, loss of independence, or even early death in the six countries, 80 deaths per day are attributed to fractures. Fractures are expensive for healthcare systems as they involve immediate medical care, rehabilitation and nursing care for the elderly who may consequently suffer from long-term disability.

Improving treatment uptake to prevent future fractures: Largely due to the ageing of the population, the annual number of fractures in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the UK and Sweden is expected to increase by 28.9% in 2025 - from a current 2.46 million to approximately 3.17 million. The total monetary burden in these six countries alone is expected to increase from 30.7 Billion in 2010 to 38.5 Billion in 2025.

Low treatment uptake is identified as a major problem. People at high risk of fracture are simply not being identified and referred for preventative treatment, while approximately 50% of those who are identified for pharmacological intervention don't follow their prescribed treatment and/or discontinue treatment within one year.

The report found that increasing treatment uptake to provide all individuals with a 10-year probability of fracture exceeding that of an age and sex-matched individual with a previous fracture with a 3-year treatment would require a 2.4-fold increase in provision of treatment. As a result, a significant number of future fractures could be avoided cost-effectively in the six European countries studied:

  • Increasing treatment uptake in the six countries would result in 95,000 fewer fractures and 33,357 Quality of Life Years (QALYs) gained annually in 2025;

  • The accumulated number of potentially avoided fractures from increasing uptake up to 2025 was estimated at 699,000;

  • 13% of the projected increase in fractures and 20% of the projected increase in lost QALYs could cost-effectively be avoided.

"There is a large gap between the number of people that are treated compared to the number that are eligible for treatment based on fracture risk, " stated IOF President John Kanis, Emeritus Professor in Human Metabolism and the Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases at the University of Sheffield. "By decreasing that gap, and simultaneously improving adherence to treatment, we could significantly reduce the future human and health economic burden of fractures in Europe," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: L. Misteli
info@iofbonehealth.org
41-229-940-100
International Osteoporosis Foundation
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. IOF calls on European citizens to stand tall and speak out for their bones
2. NOAA report calls flame retardants concern to US coastal ecosystems
3. Rutgers study finds many consumers ignore food product recalls
4. Research supports calls to study health benefits of nitrate, nitrite
5. Recalls, food worries spark booming business in food safety
6. ISWA calls attention to important contribution of waste sector to reduce substantial CO2 emissions
7. Wildlife Conservation Society finds wild cat mimicking monkey calls
8. Diabetic adults conditions improved after phone calls with fellow patients
9. MU scientist develops salmonella test that makes food safer, reduce recalls
10. New study calls for greater awareness of food supply for children with diabetes
11. Bioethics Commission calls for enhanced federal oversight in new field of synthetic biology
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/24/2017)... Janice Kephart , former 9/11 ... Partners, LLP (IdSP) , today issues the following ... March 6, 2017 Executive Order: Protecting the ... be instilled with greater confidence, enabling the reactivation ... applications are suspended by until at least July ...
(Date:4/17/2017)... NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" ... its 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K on Thursday April 13, ... ... the Investor Relations section of the Company,s website at http://www.nxt-id.com ... http://www.sec.gov . 2016 Year Highlights: ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... , April 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, ... secure authentication solutions, today announced that it has ... Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation ... program. "Innovation has been a driving ... Thor program will allow us to innovate and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... At its ... announced Dr. Suneel I. Sheikh, the co-founder, CEO and chief research scientist of ... been selected for membership in ARCS Alumni Hall of Fame . ASTER ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ComplianceOnline’s Medical Device ... on 7th and 8th June 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The Summit brings together ... as several distinguished CEOs, board directors and government officials from around the world to ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ROTTERDAM, the Netherlands and LAGUNA HILLS, ... that The Institute of Cancer Research, London ... will use MMprofiler™ with SKY92, SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify ... high-risk trial known as MUK nine . The University ... this trial, which is partly funded by Myeloma UK, and ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Singh Biotechnology today ... designation to SBT-100, its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3) ... able to cross the cell membrane and bind intracellular STAT3 and inhibit its ...
Breaking Biology Technology: