Navigation Links
Human population the primary factor in exotic plant invasions in the United States
Date:2/23/2012

Extensive ongoing research on biotic invasions around the world constantly increases data availability and improves data quality. New research in the United States shows how using improved data from previous studies on the establishment of exotic plant species changes the understanding of patterns of species naturalization, biological invasions, and their underlying mechanisms. The study was published in the open access journal NeoBiota.

Over the centuries, people brought uncounted numbers of nonnative or exotic plant species to the United States for a range of purposes. Usually cultivated for food or ornamental purposes, most of these plants are considered "naturalized" when they reproduce and sustain populations over many generations without direct help from humans. Many others were introduced accidentally.

"About 10 percent of naturalized plant species usually become invasive, and more may be so over time" says Qinfeng Guo, research ecologist with the Forest Service Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center and lead author of the article. "This means that they begin to spread considerable distances from the parent plants, often crowding or shading out native plant populations."

Guo and fellow researchers used newly added and improved data to look more closely at plant naturalization patterns across the United States. Focusing on the state-level, they correlated previously used independent variables analyses, such as human population and area with comparable-level date on native and exotic plant richness.

"When we looked at the additional variables for which data just became available, some different patterns emerged, some significant," said Guo."We found that though the number of native plant species is largely controlled by natural factors such as area and temperature, exotic species are predominantly influenced by social factors, such as human population levels and dates when states were first settled."

The researchers concluded that the positive effect of human population on the number of exotic species is probably associated with the primary sources and points of introduction along with human-assisted dispersal in the United States. They also found a strong relationship between foreign and domestic exotic richness, which might indicate that domestic and foreign exotic plants exhibit similar patterns and mechanisms of naturalization across the 48 United States despite their different origins.

Though this particular study was conducted primarily at the state level, different statistical methods produced remarkably similar results regardless spatial correlation. "However, a greater challenge ahead now is how to properly handle greater numbers of variables with increased data availability," said Guo. "Caution is needed when dealing with this data at other spatial scales such as county and county-level."


'/>"/>

Contact: Qinfeng Guo
qguo@fs.fed.us
828-257-4246
Pensoft Publishers
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics celebrates 10th birthday by presenting major gifts to human health
2. Scientists identify novel inhibitor of human microRNA
3. During exercise, the human brain shifts into high gear on alternative energy
4. Complete Genomics launches, becomes worlds first large-scale human genome sequencing company
5. Research shows Brazilian acai berry antioxidants absorbed by human body
6. Study: Bird diversity lessens human exposure to West Nile Virus
7. Human Microbiome Project awards funds for technology development, data analysis and ethical research
8. TheVisualMD.com launches new animated 3-D views of human body in action
9. Gene with probable role in human susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis identified
10. The American Society of Human Genetics hosts 58th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia
11. Genetic based human diseases are an ancient evolutionary legacy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Human population the primary factor in exotic plant invasions in the United States
(Date:6/14/2017)... -- IBM (NYSE: IBM ) is introducing several innovative partner ... developing collaboration between startups and global businesses, taking place in ... event, nine startups will showcase the solutions they have built ... France is one of ... 30 percent increase in the number of startups created between ...
(Date:5/6/2017)... , May 5, 2017 RAM ... announced a new breakthrough in biometric authentication based ... quantum mechanical properties to perform biometric authentication. These new ... semiconductor material created by Ram Group and its ... entertainment, transportation, supply chains and security. Ram Group ...
(Date:4/17/2017)... NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or the "Company"), ... Report on Form 10-K on Thursday April 13, 2017 with the ... The ... section of the Company,s website at http://www.nxt-id.com  under "SEC Filings," ... 2016 Year Highlights: Acquisition of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... BOSTON (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... name for two-dimensional representations of a complex biological network, a depiction of a ... a big mess,” said Dmitry Korkin, PhD, associate professor of computer science at ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... SARASOTA, FL (PRWEB) , ... ... ... Inc. (RPS®) today announces publication of a United States multicenter, prospective clinical ... single use, disposable, point-of-care diagnostic test capable of identifying clinically significant acute ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 ... ... has launched Rosalind™, the first-ever genomics analysis platform specifically designed for life ... Named in honor of pioneering researcher Rosalind Franklin, who made a major ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... Personal eye wash is a basic first aid supply for any work environment, but most ... you rinse first if a dangerous substance enters both eyes? It’s one less decision, and ... unique dual eye piece. , “Whether its dirt and debris, or an acid or alkali, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: