Navigation Links
How will patients, families and doctors handle the coming flood of personalized genetic data?
Date:12/6/2011

Sequencing the entire human genome took more than a decade before leaders of the Human Genome Project announced their completion of a rough draft in a 2000 White House ceremony. Finished in 2003, sequencing that first genome cost nearly $3 billion. Today, with advances in technology, an individual's whole genome can be sequenced in a few months for about $4,000.

But knowing just what to do with this knowledge has not kept pace with the gusher of genetic data. People can now have their own genome analyzedall 3 billion pairs of DNA letters per personoffering clues to their current and future risks of genetic diseases. But what will individuals do with this flood of information? Is some of it information that they prefer not to know? How will knowledge of a child's possible future risks affect the parents' decisions now?

These are just a few of the near-future issues being explored in a new four-year grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the federal agency that sponsored the Human Genome Project. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia is one of five U.S. centers, and the only one focusing on pediatrics, to receive a new four-year Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Project award. Children's Hospital will receive $2.2 million per year for four years.

The NHGHI announced the grant today as part of an intensified focus on the medical applications of its flagship Genome Sequencing Program.

The grant recipients are forming a consortium to define social and ethical issues associated with clinical sequencing, and to propose guidelines on sharing, interpreting and using this genetic information. Much of the consortium's work will focus on guiding physicians and genetic counselors in interpreting data for families and patients.

"Currently, when gene analysis helps us arrive at a diagnosis of a child's disorder, we can then counsel a family, providing information about what to expect and what o
'/>"/>

Contact: John Ascenzi
Ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. For insulin sensitive overweight patients, 1 session of exercise improves metabolic health
2. For old or young dialysis patients, AV fistulas remain pure gold
3. For osteoporosis patients, exercise pill one step closer to reality
4. Vitamin C rapidly improves emotional state of acutely hospitalized patients, say LDI researchers
5. Knowledge of genetic cancer risks often dies with patients, finds VCU Massey Cancer Center
6. Experimental radioprotective drug safe for lung cancer patients, says Pitt study
7. Gene flux can foretell survival for trauma patients, Princeton study finds
8. Effects of climate change vary greatly across plant families
9. Comprehensive cardiogenetic testing for families of sudden unexplained death victims can save lives
10. DNA Helps Reunite Children With Their Families
11. Virology text focuses on families
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/29/2014)... surprising discoveries about the body,s initial responses to ... team found that specialized cells in the intestine ... invasion and are the source of gut inflammation ... , Though aimed at the presence of ... that provides a barrier to protect the body ...
(Date:8/29/2014)... Scientists at the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging ... UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, have found ... longest-lived rodent, the naked mole rat. , They ... mole rats protects and alters the activity of the ... , The factor also protects proteasome function in human, ...
(Date:8/29/2014)... Until recently, little has been known about what ... international team of scientists, one of whom is a ... by showing that genes controlling the development of the ... rabbit domestication., The study was published Aug. 28 in ... questions. It is online at http://www.sciencemag.org/ ., The ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):The early cost of HIV 2Factor in naked mole rat's cells enhances protein integrity 2New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits 2New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits 3
... most farmers consider viruses and fungi potential threats to ... to extreme conditions, according to a Penn State virologist. ... plants is a key to sustainable agriculture that can ... possible conflicts over scare resources, said Marilyn Roossinck, professor ...
... now the first and only place in Europe where pathogens ... those responsible for AIDS, Hepatitis and some types of flu ... synchrotron light. This special light allows scientists to study virus ... extends that capability to many viruses that have a major ...
... cells more economical, engineers want a fast and efficient iron-based ... 17 at Nature Chemistry , researchers report such a ... directly to electricity. The result moves chemists and engineers one ... with today,s fuel cells is that the platinum they use ...
Cached Biology News:Microbes team up to boost plants' stress tolerance 2Diamond sheds light on basic building blocks of life 2Diamond sheds light on basic building blocks of life 3Synthetic molecule first electricity-making catalyst to use iron to split hydrogen gas 2Synthetic molecule first electricity-making catalyst to use iron to split hydrogen gas 3
(Date:8/29/2014)... -- Pfenex Inc. (NYSE MKT: PFNX), a clinical-stage biotechnology ... difficult to manufacture proteins including biosimilar therapeutics, today ... for the second quarter ended June 30, 2014. ... initial public offering, we have the capital to ... from our proprietary protein expression platform," stated Bertrand ...
(Date:8/29/2014)... electrons, but one of the most promising technologies for ... on light (photons) instead of electrons. First, it is ... single photons and control their direction. Researchers around the ... this control, but now scientists at the Niels Bohr ... photons emitted one at a time and in a ...
(Date:8/29/2014)... The global companion diagnostics market ... It is expected to grow at a CAGR ... valued at $1.8 billion in 2013, according to ... , For more information regarding analysis details and ... research report, titled “Companion Diagnostics Market (Breast Cancer, ...
(Date:8/29/2014)... According to a new market report published ... market was valued at USD 3,754.6 million in 2012 and ... 2019at a CAGR of 5.9% from 2013 to 2019. , ... is afflicted by bone and joint disorders, and this number ... has and will continue to increase the demand for orthobiologics. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Pfenex Reports Second Quarter 2014 Results and Provides Business Update 2Pfenex Reports Second Quarter 2014 Results and Provides Business Update 3Pfenex Reports Second Quarter 2014 Results and Provides Business Update 4Pfenex Reports Second Quarter 2014 Results and Provides Business Update 5Pfenex Reports Second Quarter 2014 Results and Provides Business Update 6Pfenex Reports Second Quarter 2014 Results and Provides Business Update 7Pfenex Reports Second Quarter 2014 Results and Provides Business Update 8Breakthrough in light sources for new quantum technology 2Companion Diagnostics Market to Hit $5.6 Billion in 2019: Transparency Market Research 2Companion Diagnostics Market to Hit $5.6 Billion in 2019: Transparency Market Research 3Global Orthobiologics Market to Reach $5,519.9 Million by 2019: Transparency Market Research 2Global Orthobiologics Market to Reach $5,519.9 Million by 2019: Transparency Market Research 3
UltraPure DNase/RNase-Free Distilled Water is designed for use in all molecular biology applications. It is 0.1-m membrane-filtered and tested for DNase and RNase activity....
...
The S. cerevisiae Hansen strains are the parental yeast strains from which the deletions were derived....
The DNA DipStick Kit is ideal for estimating nucleic acid concentrations and approximate yields. Works with ss- and ds-DNA, RNA, and oligonucleotides at concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/l....
Biology Products: