Navigation Links
Hopes that new substance will induce cancer cell suicide
Date:9/18/2012

The p53 gene plays a key role in the prevention of cancer, by blocking cell growth and triggering programmed cell death or apoptosis. If, however, p53 has mutated and become defective, the cancer cells can acquire the ability to evade apoptosis and become more resistant to therapy. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden have now obtained results from the first tests using a new substance that can restore the function of defective p53 and activate apoptosis in cancer cells.

The substance is known as APR-246 and has now been tested on humans in a phase I/II study, which was conducted on 22 patients with advanced blood or prostate cancer. Some of the patients came from the Haematology Centre at the Karolinska University Hospital in, Stockholm, where the study's lead investigator, consultant Dr Sren Lehmann is based. The remainder of the patients were from other clinics in Gothenburg, Lund, Uppsala and rebro.

The patients received daily infusions of APR-246 for four days. When the researchers analyzed the cancer cells taken before and after treatment, they saw indications that the p53 gene had been activated to varying degrees, and that this had triggered the suicide program in the cancer cells. Ten patients could be evaluated as regards the development of their cancer, and in two of them there were signs of tumour regression.

However, the study was actually not designed to test the clinical effects but to ascertain how well the substance was tolerated by the body. With the main adverse reactions confined to temporary tiredness, nausea, headache and confusion, their results would suggest that the substance is well tolerated.

"The side-effects were totally different to those produced by conventional chemotherapy, which bodes well for designing combination therapies," says Dr Lehmann. "And it's in precisely this kind of combination that we think the substance has the greatest potential. In previous laboratory studies we've seen that APR-246 has generated synergy gains when used with chemotherapy due to the mutually enhancing effects of both substances."

Defective p53 is considered one of the most common factors behind the development of cancer. In some cancers, such as ovarian cancer, the vast majority of tumours have defective p53. In total, the p53 tumour suppressor gene is mutated in at least half of all tumours.

"In theory, a drug that restores p53 function should be effective against many different kinds of cancer, provided that the individual tumour contains defective p53," says study team member Professor Klas Wiman. "We should keep in mind, however, that tumours are very complex."

APR-246 was discovered by Klas Wiman and colleagues at Karolinska Institutet, and the present study was led from Karolinska University Hospital in association with Aprea AB. Aprea AB's principal shareholder is Karolinska Development, a company listed on the NASDAQ OMX Stockholm exchange. Professor Wiman is co-founder and shareholder of Aprea, and a member of its board.


'/>"/>

Contact: Press Office
pressinfo@ki.se
46-852-486-077
Karolinska Institutet
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. On the safe side: Contact-free analysis of chemical substances
2. Using cell phones to detect harmful airborne substances
3. Weight gain induced by high-fat diet increases active-period sleep and sleep fragmentation
4. Light-induced delivery of nitric oxide eradicates drug-resistant bacteria
5. Eliza Corporation and BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina Drive Awareness and Healthier Behavior to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screenings by 45 Percent
6. Mushroom-derived compound lengthens survival in dogs with cancer, Penn Vet study finds
7. Researchers reveal a chemo-resistant cancer stem cell as cancers Achilles heel
8. Swim training plus healthy diet factor in cancer fight: New study
9. UNC Lineberger scientists lead definition of key lung cancer genome
10. New potential targets discovered for treating squamous cell lung cancers
11. The CNIO welcomes the new academic year with a spotlight on cancer genetics
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/10/2017)... DUBLIN , Feb 10, 2017 ... PharmaBiotech,s new report "Personalized Medicine - Scientific and Commercial ... ... in personalized medicine. Diagnosis is integrated with therapy for selection ... emphasis on early detection and prevention of disease in modern ...
(Date:2/8/2017)... 7, 2017 Report Highlights ... The global synthetic-biology market reached ... by 2021, growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) ... of the global markets for synthetic biology. - Analyses of ... and projections of compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2021. ...
(Date:2/7/2017)... Ind. , Feb. 7, 2017 Zimmer ... leader in musculoskeletal healthcare, will present at the LEERINK ... New York Palace Hotel on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 ... live webcast of the presentation can be accessed at ... replay following the conference via Zimmer Biomet,s Investor Relations ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... -- Financial Highlights ... unaudited)Three Months Ended December 31,Twelve Months Ended December 31,20162015% ... $           300$   ... Product Revenue 3539(10)%9498(4)%Kuvan Net Product ... 756025%297303(2)%Vimizim Net Product Revenue ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... 2017  Seattle,s upscale Capitol Hill neighborhood, with its swanky shops, ... a head lice treatment salon to set up shop. But ... and a French bistro on E Madison Ave, and CEO ... any old lice clinic, we pride ourselves on being a ... some of the stigma associated with lice. Everyone can get ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 23, 2017 , ... ... as insulin, cortisol, CRP, adiponectin, uric acid, and/or other biomarkers or SNPs of ... Assay from Salimetrics’ SalivaLab , the relationship between insulin and other relevant ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... February 22, 2017 , ... Seventy-one members ... named Fellows of the Society this year, the Fellows Committee has announced. The ... of optics, photonics, and imaging as well as their service to the Society ...
Breaking Biology Technology: