Navigation Links
'Honey bee health' of concern at Western Apicultural Society conference

Honey bee specialists and native pollinator experts will address the 31st annual Western Apicultural Society (WAS) Conference, set Aug. 17-20 in Healdsburg, Sonoma County.

The main conference sessions will take place in the Dry Creek Inn and Krug Event Center, 198 Dry Creek Road.

"The conference provides an opportunity to learn about bee health and disease research and to interact with professionals," said president Eric Mussen of Davis, Cooperative Extension apiculturist and member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology faculty since 1976.

WAS, founded in 1978, is a non-profit, educational, beekeeping organization that draws its membership from beekeepers throughout western North America, but all interested persons throughout the world may join. The last WAS conference took place in Victoria, B.C.

Besides presentations on bee health and disease research, the conference will include such topics as beekeeping with minimal chemical input, cooperative rearing of local honey bee stocks, identifying non-Apis pollinators, impacts of native bees on commercial crop production and the biology and management of honey bees. In addition, various aspects of honey and human health will be addressed.

Registration takes place from 3 to 5 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 17 followed by wine and honey tasting.

On Tuesday, Aug. 18, researchers from three universities will speak. Jerry Bromenshenk, University of Montana, Missoula, will discuss "Pathogens Found Associated with Honey Bees." UC Davis Haagen-Dazs Postdoctoral Fellow Michelle Flenniken, also is a researcher at UC San Francisco, will speak on "Honey Bee Resistance to Viral Infections." Steve Sheppard of Washington State University, Pullman, will cover ""Washington State Honey Bee Health Program: Breeding, Diagnostics and Insecticide Tolerance."

"Jerry's likely to describe and display his hand-held, acoustic monitoring device that 'listens' to the health of a honey bee colony," Mussen said

On Wednesday morning, Aug. 19, participants have a choice of taking a Glen Allen apiary tour or attending an additional-cost seminar taught by bee expert, writer and instructor Larry Conner of Kalamazoo, Mich.

The tour participants will hear a talk by Anne Teller of Oak Hill Farm, Sonoma, an organic producer of field crops, flowers and baked products; and visit the Glen Ellen hilltop apiary of Serge Labesque, who will discuss demonstration hives and watering devices.

Wednesday afternoon will include lectures by three native pollinator experts. Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor at UC Davis, will discuss "Introduction to Native Bees." Neal Williams, a newly recruited faculty member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, will cover "Native Bees in Crop Production in Eastern States." Claire Kremen, a conservation biologist at UC Berkeley and an affiliate with the UC Davis Department of Entomology, will discuss "Native Bees in Crop Production in Western States."

On Thursday morning, Aug. 20, participants will hear "Effects of Honey on Human Physiology" by Ron Fessenden of Haaddam, Kan., founder of the Committee for the Promotion of Honey and Health, Inc., and co-author of the books, "The Hibernation Diet" and "The Honey Revolution."

Also on Thursday:

  • Incoming WAS president Dewey Caron, emeritus professor of the University of Delaware, Newark, and author of the textbook "Honey Bee Biology and Beekeeping," will discuss "Colony Natural History."

  • Liz Applegate, a nationally renowned expert on nutrition and fitness and member of the UC Davis Department of Nutrition faculty, will speak on "Honey and Exercise Physiology."

  • Randy Oliver, a Grass Valley beekeeper and also a part-time researcher, teacher and author, will offer "Beekeeping Tips Based on Experimental Trial and Error."

The conference ends Thursday with a silent auction and awards banquet. Awards to be presented are "Outstanding Service to Beekeeping" and the "Thurber Award for Inventiveness."

Those attending the four-day conference are invited to bring jars of honey to share at the tasting session and/or to share with other beekeepers. Those planning on visiting the apiary should bring their veils.

Registration is $130 per person and is due July 15. Registration forms, the conference schedule and hotel reservation suggestions are online at More information is available from Mussen at (530) 752-0472 or

Mussen said membership in WAS is "encouraged from anywhere in the world." However, the organization was designed specifically to meet the educational needs of beekeepers from Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming; the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon; and the states of northern Mexico. Annual dues range from $7.50 to $15.

WAS also publishes a quarterly journal.


Contact: Kathy Keatley Garvey
University of California - Davis

Related biology news :

1. Jeepers creepers: Climate change threatens endangered honeycreepers
2. A cure for honey bee colony collapse?
3. Flight of the bumble (and honey) bee
4. Honeybees succumb to cocaines allure
5. Honey bees on cocaine dance more, changing ideas about the insect brain
6. Honeybees as plant bodyguards
7. Honey adds health benefits, is natural preservative and sweetener in salad dressings
8. Researchers discover that growing up too fast may mean dying young in honey bees
9. Pesticide build-up could lead to poor honey bee health
10. Honeybee researcher to unravel properties governing lifespan with support from Norway
11. Haagen-Dazs gift to support Penn State honeybee research
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
'Honey bee health' of concern at Western Apicultural Society conference
(Date:11/4/2015)... , November 4, 2015 ... market report published by Transparency Market Research "Home Security Solutions ... and Forecast 2015 - 2022", the global home security solutions ... bn by 2022. The market is estimated to expand ... from 2015 to 2022. Rising security needs among customers ...
(Date:10/29/2015)... 2015  Rubicon Genomics, Inc., today announced an ... its DNA library preparation products, including the ThruPLEX ... Plasma-seq kit. ThruPLEX Plasma-seq has been optimized for ... libraries for liquid biopsies--the analysis of cell-free circulating ... in cancer and other conditions. Eurofins Scientific is ...
(Date:10/27/2015)... 2015 Munich, Germany ... technology (ASGM) automatically maps data from mobile eye tracking ... , so that they can be quantitatively analyzed with ... Munich, Germany , October 28-29, 2015. SMI,s Automated ... mobile eye tracking videos created with SMI,s Eye ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... and the Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals (OPBAP) has been formalized with the ... other AMA team leaders met with OPBAP leaders Capt. Karl Minter and Capt. ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... featured on AngelList early in their initial angel funding process. Now, they are ... individuals looking to make early stage investments in the microbiome space. In ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 2015 Cepheid (NASDAQ: CPHD ) today ... following conference, and invited investors to participate via webcast. ...      Tuesday, December 1, 2015 at 11.00 a.m. Eastern Time ...      Tuesday, December 1, 2015 at 11.00 a.m. Eastern Time ... New York, NY      Tuesday, December 1, 2015 ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Copper is ... it is bound to proteins, copper is also toxic to cells. With a ... Polytechnic Institute (WPI) will conduct a systematic study of copper in the bacteria ...
Breaking Biology Technology: