Navigation Links
Health choices predict cancer survival, U-M study finds
Date:4/1/2009

ANN ARBOR, Mich. Head and neck cancer patients who smoked, drank, didn't exercise or didn't eat enough fruit when they were diagnosed had worse survival outcomes than those with better health habits, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

"While there has been a recent emphasis on biomarkers and genes that might be linked to cancer survival, the health habits a person has at diagnosis play a major role in his or her survival," says study author Sonia Duffy, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor of nursing at the U-M School of Nursing, research assistant professor of otolaryngology at the U-M Medical School, and research scientist at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System.

Each of the factors was independently associated with survival. Results of the study appear online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

The researchers surveyed 504 head and neck cancer patients about five health behaviors: smoking, alcohol use, diet, exercise and sleep. Patients were surveyed every three months for two years then yearly after that.

Smoking was the biggest predictor of survival, with current smokers having the shortest survival. Problem drinking and low fruit intake were also associated with worse survival, although vegetable intake was not. Lack of exercise also appears to decrease survival.

"Health behaviors are only sporadically addressed in busy oncology clinics where the major focus is on surgery, chemotherapy or radiation. Addressing health behaviors may enhance the survival advantage offered by these treatments," says Duffy, a U-M Cancer Center investigator.

Complicating matters is that many of these health behaviors are inter-related. For example, smokers might also be heavy drinkers, making it more difficult to quit. It's not enough, Duffy points out, to refer someone to a smoking cessation program if alcohol is a major underlying problem.

In addition, previous research has associated many of these health behaviors with preventing cancer. In the current study, a third of the patients reported eating fewer than four servings of fruit per month. Nutrition experts recommend two servings of fruit per day.

"Eating fruits and vegetables, not smoking and drinking in moderation can have a big impact on a person's risk of getting cancer in the first place. Now it appears that these factors also impact survival after diagnosis," Duffy says.

The next step for the researchers is to look at behavior changes over time to determine if changing health habits when a person is diagnosed can impact survival. That will help determine what types of interventions or services should be offered to patients in the clinic.


'/>"/>

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Exploring the dynamic relationship between health and environment
2. The sunlight solution for better health
3. NIH funds research center for womens reproductive health at Einstein
4. NJIT receives $20,000 grant from Horizon Foundation to promote teen health
5. Lincoln Park Zoo scientists awarded National Institutes of Health grant
6. Doctors endorse vegan and vegetarian diets for healthy pregnancies
7. Healthy food availability could depend on where you live -- so does the quality of your diet
8. Experiment of nature examines how mothers diet may impact on childs health
9. Toxicology program features wide range of human health and environment topical sessions
10. Queens University Belfast improves Malaysian public health
11. Childhood chicken pox could affect oral health years later
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/12/2016)... WearablesResearch.com , a brand of Troubadour Research & ... Q1 wave of its quarterly wearables survey. A particular ... a program where they would receive discounts for sharing ... "We were surprised to see that so many ... CEO of Troubadour Research, "primarily because there are segments ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... 3, 2016  Neurotechnology, a provider of high-precision ... Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) , a complete ... MegaMatcher ABIS can process multiple complex biometric transactions ... of fingerprint, face or iris biometrics. It leverages ... and MegaMatcher Accelerator , which have been ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... Sweden , April 28, 2016 First ... M (139.9), up 966% compared with the first quarter of 2015 ... profit totaled SEK 589.1 M (loss: 18.8) and the operating margin ... 7.12 (loss: 0.32) Cash flow from operations was SEK ... The 2016 revenue guidance is unchanged, SEK 7,000-8,500 M. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/18/2016)... , ... May 18, 2016 , ... ... hospitalizations are a direct result of asthma complications.* Costing more than $56 billion ... country. , “For too many, the suffering associated with uncontrolled ...
(Date:5/17/2016)... , ... May 17, 2016 , ... ... in animal waste reduction applications, announced today it will be showcasing ManureMagic™ at ... , ManureMagic™ was featured in the Wall Street Journal last year and more ...
(Date:5/17/2016)... Strekin AG, a start-up ... Switzerland announced today the in-licensing of ... protein kinase.      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160513/367502LOGO ... the necessary research foundation for the clinical development ... play fundamental roles. Pamapimod has a well-established safety ...
(Date:5/17/2016)... ... May 17, 2016 , ... New tests that go beyond the standard PSA ... information that both the patient and doctor want and need to know in individualizing ... American Urological Association’s annual meeting in San Diego, involve using blood, urine and tissue ...
Breaking Biology Technology: