Navigation Links
Harvard's Wyss Institute uses nature's design principles to create specialized nanofabrics
Date:6/2/2010

CAMBRIDGE, MA -- In Nature, cells and tissues assemble and organize themselves within a matrix of protein fibers that ultimately determines their structure and function, such as the elasticity of skin and the contractility of heart tissue. These natural design principles have now been successfully replicated in the lab by bioengineers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University.

These bioengineers have developed a new technology that can be used to regenerate heart and other tissues and to make nanometer-thick fabrics that are both strong and extremely elastic. The key breakthrough came in the development of a matrix that can assemble itself through interaction with a thermosensitive surface. The protein composition of that matrix can be customized to generate specific properties, and the nanofabric can then be lifted off as a sheet by altering temperature.

"To date it has been very difficult to replicate this extracellular matrix using manmade materials," said Adam W. Feinberg, a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University who will be an Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University in the fall. "But we thought if cells can build this matrix at the surface of their membranes, maybe we can build it ourselves on a surface too. We were thrilled to see that we could."

Feinberg is the lead author of "Surface-Initiated Assembly of Protein Nanofabrics," which appears in the current issue of Nano Letters, a publication of the American Chemical Society. Coauthor Kit Parker is a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute, the Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Applied Science and Associate Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS, and a member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute.

In the area of tissue regeneration, their technology, which is termed protein nanofabrics, represents a significant step forward. Current methods for regenerating tissue typically involve using synthetic polymers to create a scaffolding. But this approach can cause negative side effects as the polymers degrade. By contrast, nanofabrics are made from the same proteins as normal tissue, and thus the body can degrade them with no ill effects once they are no longer needed. Initial results have produced strands of heart muscle similar to the papillary muscle, which may lead to new strategies for repair and regeneration throughout the heart.

"With nanofabrics, we can control thread count, orientation, and composition, and that capability allows us to create novel tissue engineering scaffolds that direct regeneration," said Parker. "It also enables us to exploit the nanoscale properties of these proteins in new ways beyond medical applications. There are a broad range of applications for this technology using natural, or designer, synthetic proteins."

High-performance textiles are the second main application for this technology. By altering the type of protein used in the matrix, researchers can manipulate thread count, fiber orientation, and other properties to create fabrics with extraordinary properties. Today, an average rubber band can be stretched 500 to 600 percent, but future textiles may be stretchable by as much as 1,500 percent. Future applications for such textiles are as diverse as form-fitting clothing, bandages that accelerate healing, and industrial manufacturing.

The research is part of a larger program in Nanotextiles at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. In the same issue of Nano Letters, Parker's team also reported on the development of a new technology that fabricates nanofibers using a high-speed, rotating jet and nozzle. This invention has potential applications ranging from artificial organs and tissue regeneration to clothing and air filters.

"The Wyss Institute is very proud to be associated with two such significant discoveries," said Donald E. Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., Founding Director of the Wyss Institute. "These are great examples of realizing our mission of using Nature's design principles to develop technologies that will have a huge impact on the way we live."

The Wyss Institute works as an alliance among Harvard's schools of Medicine, Engineering, and Arts & Sciences in partnership with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Children's Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Boston University.

By emulating Nature's principles for self-organizing and self-regulating, Wyss researchers are developing innovative new solutions for healthcare, energy, architecture, robotics, and manufacturing. These technologies are translated into commercial products and therapies through collaborations with clinical investigators and corporate alliances.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mary Tolikas
mary.tolikas@wyss.harvard.edu
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Palm Beach County wants to establish a Max Planck Institute in Florida
2. Midlands Consortium delighted to be chosen to host £1 billion energy institute
3. $22 million gift from Alfred Taubman launches new biomedical research institute
4. 3 Columbia University Medical Center faculty elected to Institute of Medicine
5. Stowers Institutes Xie Lab demonstrates dual intrinsic and extrinsic control of stem cell aging
6. Weizmann Institute scientists discover: A risk distribution law for evolution
7. Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research to set up its first Asian branch in Singapore
8. Baker Institute finds increased domestic production wont make US self-sufficient in natural gas
9. Lupus Research Institute strategy delivers $30 million in national funding
10. Stowers Institutes Hawley Lab identifies factors responsible for restart of meiotic cycle
11. Pew Institute for Ocean Science awards 5 fellowships in support of global marine conservation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Harvard's Wyss Institute uses nature's design principles to create specialized nanofabrics
(Date:4/19/2016)... DUBAI , UAE, April 20, 2016 ... can be implemented as a compact web-based "all-in-one" system ... in the biometric fingerprint reader or the door interface ... requirements of modern access control systems. The minimal dimensions ... the ID readers into the building installations offer considerable ...
(Date:4/14/2016)... Israel , April 14, 2016 ... Authentication and Malware Detection, today announced the appointment of ... assumed the new role. Goldwerger,s leadership appointment ... on the heels of the deployment of its platform ... BioCatch,s behavioral biometric technology, which discerns unique cognitive and ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... PROVIDENCE, R.I. , March 31, 2016  Genomics ... leadership of founding CEO, Barrett Bready , M.D., ... addition, members of the original technical leadership team, including ... Vice President of Product Development, Steve Nurnberg and Vice ... have returned to the company. Dr. Bready ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... Amgen, will join the faculty of the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler ... of strategy and entrepreneurship at UNC Kenan-Flagler, with a focus on the school’s ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... -- Regular discussions on a range of subjects including policies, debt ... said Poloz. Speaking at a lecture to the ... pointed to the country,s inflation target, which is set by ... "In certain areas there needs to ... goals, why not sit down and address strategy together?" ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Researchers at the Universita Politecnica delle Marche in Ancona ... or pleural mesothelioma. Their findings are the subject of a new article on the ... are signposts in the blood, lung fluid or tissue of mesothelioma patients that can ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016   Boston Biomedical , ... compounds designed to target cancer stemness pathways, announced ... granted Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. Food ... gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Napabucasin ... to inhibit cancer stemness pathways by targeting STAT3, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: