Navigation Links
Happy holidays from the groaning board; Western diets turn on fat genes
Date:11/30/2009

Those extra helpings of gravy and dessert at the holiday table are even less of a help to your waistline than previously thought. According to a new research report recently appearing online in The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org), a diet that is high in fat and in sugar actually switches on genes that ultimately cause our bodies to store too much fat. This means these foods hit you with a double-whammy as the already difficult task of converting high-fat and high-sugar foods to energy is made even harder because these foods also turn our bodies into "supersized fat-storing" machines.

In the research report, scientists show that foods high in fat and sugar stimulate a known opioid receptor, called the kappa opioid receptor, which plays a role in fat metabolism. When this receptor is stimulated, it causes our bodies to hold on to far more fat than our bodies would do otherwise.

According to Traci Ann Czyzyk-Morgan, one of the researchers involved in the work, "the data presented here support the hypothesis that overactivation of kappa opioid receptors contribute to the development of obesity specifically during prolonged consumption of high-fat, calorically dense diets."

To make this discovery, Czyzyk-Morgan and her colleagues conducted tests in two groups of mice. One group had the kappa opioid receptor genetically deactivated ("knocked out") and the other group was normal. Both groups were given a high fat, high sucrose, energy dense diet for 16 weeks. While the control group of mice gained significant weight and fat mass on this diet, the mice with the deactivated receptor remained lean. In addition to having reduced fat stores, the mice with the deactivated receptor also showed a reduced ability to store incoming nutrients.

Although more work is necessary to examine what the exact effects would be in humans, this research may help address the growing obesity problem worldwide in both the short-term and long-term. Most immediately, this research provides more proof that high-fat and high-sugar diets should be avoided. In the long-term, however, this research is even more significant, as it provides a new drug target for developing therapies for preventing obesity and helping obese people slim down.

"In times when food was scarce and starvation an ever-present threat, an adaptation that allows our bodies to store as much energy as possible during plentiful times was probably a lifesaver," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "By taking that opioid receptor off the table, researchers may have found a way to keep us from eating ourselves to death."


'/>"/>

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Happy flies look for a place like home
2. A happy new year for penguins
3. Genes hold the key to how happy we are, scientists say
4. Wolves find happy hunting grounds in Yellowstone National Park
5. Seeing family for the holidays? Scientists discover how the stress might kill you
6. UT Southwestern scientist begins to unravel what makes pandemic H1N1 tick
7. UT Southwestern receives $42 million in Recovery Act stimulus funding
8. UT Southwestern researchers use drug-radiation combo to eradicate lung cancer
9. UT Southwestern patient first in North Texas to receive newest-generation heart failure device
10. ICU patients on ventilators flex and stretch in study at Case Western Reserve University
11. Science wins fight over evolution in schools, says Case Western Reserve University author
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/14/2017)... 14, 2017  Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center today ... chief executive officer (CEO). Freischlag joins the medical center ... McConnell , M.D., who last year announced that he ... Center, after leading it since 2008.   ... Wake Forest Baptist,s academic health system, which includes Wake ...
(Date:2/8/2017)... 8, 2017 About Voice Recognition Biometrics Voice ... it against a stored voiceprint template. Acoustic features ... and tone are compared to distinguish between individual ... as most PCs already have a microphone and ... recognition biometrics are most likely to be deployed ...
(Date:2/7/2017)... 2017   MedNet Solutions , an innovative SaaS-based ... clinical research, is pleased to announce that the latest ... highly flexible and award winning eClinical solution, is now ... is a proven Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) clinical research technology ... but also delivers an entire suite of eClinical tools ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... 2017 Provectus Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. (OTCQB: PVCT, ... clinical-stage oncology and dermatology biopharmaceutical company, today is ... in its previously announced rights offering of up ... common stock and Series C Convertible Preferred Stock ... As previously announced, the rights ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Feb. 24, 2017 Symic Bio, a ... a new category of therapeutics, announced today the completion ... in peripheral artery disease. The trial will evaluate the ... therapeutic, in the reduction of restenosis following angioplasty. ... development milestone for SB-030," said Nathan Bachtell , ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... China Cord Blood Corporation (NYSE: CO ) ... blood collection, laboratory testing, hematopoietic stem cell processing and ... results for the third quarter and first nine months ... Third Quarter of Fiscal 2017 Highlights ... increased by 18.6% to RMB200.9 million ($28.9 million). ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... 2017 China Biologic Products, Inc. (NASDAQ: CBPO) ("China ... company in China, today announced its financial results for the ... Fourth Quarter 2016 Financial Highlights Total ... in RMB terms, or increased by 13.6% in USD terms ... of 2015. Gross profit increased by 13.3% ...
Breaking Biology Technology: