Navigation Links
Growth factor predicts poor outcome in breast cancer
Date:8/29/2008

The response to insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) in breast cancer cells predicts an aggressive tumor that is less likely to respond to treatment, said researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The finding gives impetus to the movement to tailor cancer treatments to attributes of the various tumors.

"These findings come at a critical time," said Dr. Adrian Lee, associate professor in the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at BCM. "Our goal is to identify biomarkers that will help predict which patients will respond to therapy against insulin-like growth factor. Several inhibitors of the IGF pathway are in patient studies right now. There's a large movement to understand which patients will respond to these drugs. This is a step toward that goal"

In this study, Lee and his colleagues stimulated breast cancer cells with IGF-I in the laboratory and defined how more than 800 genes in the cells responded to the growth factor. They then examined samples of patient breast tumors with this "gene signature" and correlated the gene signatures with the fate of the patients.

"We have technology now to allow us to globally assess what IGF is doing in breast cancer at the whole gene expression level," said Lee. "This is one of the first studies to do that. We know that IGF is bad in cancer, but now we can globally understand it in a more comprehensive manner. It could lead to finding biomarkers for patients response" to breast cancer treatments.

"We found that IGF-I is a major regulator of cell growth and cell survival," said Lee. "It also regulates DNA repair."

This has major implications for anti-cancer treatments that seek to cause DNA damage and tumor cell death.

"If you have something regulating DNA repair, you want that turned off," said Lee.

They found that tumors in which IGF (insulin-like growth factor) affected the way in which genes were activated or translated into messages were more aggressive and more likely to grow. They also found that the effect of IGF was independent of whether the tumor was affected by estrogen or not.

"This is very important," said Lee. "Once patients are resistant to hormone treatment (as with tamoxifen), their treatment options are limited. A treatment that inhibited receptors for IGF might give them another option."

Currently, the Breast Center is studying the effects of an IGF receptor antibody combined with a drug called exemestane (Aromasin or an aromatase inhibitor that blocks estrogen production) in postmenopausal women. One group of women take the combination and the other takes exemestane.

Bioinformatics the ability to analyze large amounts of data proved key to the study, said Lee. In fact, the first author, Dr. Chad J. Creighton of BCM, is a bioinformatician, said Lee.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kimberlee K. Norton
kknorton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Heavy metal link to mutations, low growth and fertility among crustaceans in Sydney Harbor tributary
2. Hydrogels provide scaffolding for growth of bone cells
3. Zebra Technologies Enters Into Revolving Credit Agreement to Support Company Growth
4. Old growth giants limited by water-pulling ability
5. BIO-key(R) Reports Profitability on Strong Revenue Growth for Second Quarter 2008
6. [video] Michael DePasquale, CEO of BIO-key International, Inc., Discusses Q2 2008 Revenue Growth on WallSt.nets 3-Minute Press Show
7. BIO-key(R) Reports Profitability on Strong Revenue Growth for Second Quarter 2008
8. Embryo biopsy does not affect early growth and risk of congenital malformations in PGD/PGS babies
9. Growth hormones link to starvation may be clue to increasing life span, researchers find
10. Blue light used to harden tooth fillings stunts tumor growth
11. Scientists find potential protein biomarkers for growth hormone
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/9/2017)... Feb. 9, 2017 The biomass boiler market ... the biomass boiler market globally in terms of revenue ... boilers. The market for biomass boilers has been segmented ... application, and country/region. The market based on feedstock type, ... residues, biogas & energy crops, urban residues, and others. ...
(Date:2/8/2017)... , Feb. 7, 2017 Report Highlights ... The global ... reach $11.4 billion by 2021, growing at a compound annual ... - An overview of the global markets for synthetic biology. ... estimates for 2016, and projections of compound annual growth rates ...
(Date:2/7/2017)...   MedNet Solutions , an innovative SaaS-based eClinical ... research, is pleased to announce that the latest release ... flexible and award winning eClinical solution, is now available ... is a proven Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) clinical research technology platform ... also delivers an entire suite of eClinical tools to ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/22/2017)... , ... March 21, 2017 , ... The Conference Forum ... (CMO Summit) to be held on May 10-11, 2017, at the Colonnade Hotel in ... specifically for Chief Medical Officer peer-to-peer learning, benchmarking and support. , “The Chief Medical ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 22, 2017 , ... March 22, 2017...Council for ... another green revolution, one that utilizes technological innovation in smart, sustainable ways. Humans depend ... life such as aesthetics and environmental stability. This paper is the first in a ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... SAN FRANCISCO , March 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... the fastest growing genetic information companies, today announced ... the diagnosis of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) ... the leading lethal genetic disorders among infants as ... disease in childhood. The new test, announced during ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... Diego, CA (PRWEB) , ... March 20, 2017 ... ... novel therapies for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, today announced that it has entered into ... (NRG-4) for therapies in inflammatory bowel disease including Necrotizing Enterocolitis (rare orphan disease) ...
Breaking Biology Technology: