Navigation Links
Greener horizons: Plastics may grow on trees

Money may not grow on trees, but gasoline, computers, and tennis shoes just might thanks to new biotech advances that could allow manufacturers to produce fuel, plastics, and other chemicals from plants instead of petroleum. That's the topic of an article in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine.

C&EN Senior Business Editor Melody Voith notes that today's plant-based fuels and plastics involve growing crops and then using physical and chemical means to extract sugars that manufacturers transform into the desired product. But a growing number of plant biotechnology companies are trying to make plants do more of the manufacturing work. For example, several companies are trying to develop specially-engineered plants, such as switchgrass and corn, that make it easier and faster for manufacturers to produce biofuels. The development could potentially lower the cost of renewable fuels, the article notes.

But producing chemical factories from plants will involve challenges. Farmers will need to gamble on new, risky crops planted over large areas. It's also unclear how processors will collect and efficiently transport these plant products. In the meantime, research and development of new plant traits is moving at a brisk pace in several biotech labs, the article notes.


Contact: Michael Bernstein
American Chemical Society

Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. This grass is still greener
2. Growing greener greens
3. Genomic research will enable greener cleanup of military explosive test sites
4. UAB, partners seek safe carbon dioxide storage for greener power generation
5. Glimpsing a greener future
6. Research is vital to a cleaner, greener, low carbon future
7. Simplifying manufacture of drugs, plastics earns UH chemist top honor
8. Boost for green plastics from plants
9. Protein fibrils as alternative plastics?
10. Plastics suspect in lobster illness
11. Kalyon wins Society of Plastics Engineers 2008 Research Award
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/17/2015)... Paris , qui ... Paris , qui s,est tenu du ... leader de l,innovation biométrique, a inventé le premier scanner ... sur la même surface de balayage. Jusqu,ici, deux scanners ... les empreintes digitales. Désormais, un seul scanner est en ...
(Date:11/16/2015)... , Nov 16, 2015  Synaptics Inc. ... human interface solutions, today announced expansion of its ... ™ touch controller and display driver integration ... of smartphones. These new TDDI products add to ... (HD resolution), TD4302 (WQHD resolution), and TD4322 (FHD ...
(Date:11/12/2015)... , Nov. 11, 2015   Growing need ... analytical tools has been paving the way for ... determination of discrete analytes in clinical, agricultural, environmental, ... being predominantly used in medical applications, however, their ... sectors due to continuous emphasis on improving product ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... PHILADELPIA, PA (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... young entrepreneurs at competitive events in five states to develop and pitch their BIG ... student projects from each state are competing for votes to win the title of ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , November 24, 2015 SHPG ) ... participate in the Piper Jaffray 27 th Annual Healthcare Conference ... December 1, 2015, at 8:30 a.m. EST (1:30 p.m. GMT). ... Chief Financial Officer, will participate in the Piper Jaffray 27 th ... , NY on Tuesday, December 1, 2015, at 8:30 a.m. EST ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015  Tikcro Technologies Ltd. (OTCQB: TIKRF) today announced ... 29, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. Israel time, at ... 98 Yigal Allon Street, 36 th Floor, Tel Aviv, ... Eric Paneth and Izhak Tamir to the Board of ... as external directors; , approval of an amendment to certain terms ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... SAN FRANCISCO , Nov. 24, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... today announced that Emily Leproust, Ph.D., Twist Bioscience ... Piper Jaffray Healthcare Conference on December 1, 2015 ... Palace Hotel in New York City. ... . Twist Bioscience is on ...
Breaking Biology Technology: