Navigation Links
Grazing as a conservation tool
Date:5/3/2011

NEW YORK (May 3, 2011) Rotational grazing of cattle in native pasturelands in Brazil's Pantanal and Cerrado regions can benefit both cattle and wildlife, according to a new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society.

The technique, which has been adapted for a variety of livestock worldwide, calls for cattle to graze in small areas for shorter periods of time before moving onto other pastures. The result is a greater forage base that produces larger, more valuable cattle while reducing incentives for deforestation, uncontrolled burning, and replacement of native vegetation with exotic grasses.

The study appears in the March 2011 edition of Mongabay.com's open access journal: Tropical Conservation Science. Authors of the study include: Donald Parsons Eaton, Jos Verglio Bernardes Lima and Alexine Keuroghlian of the Wildlife Conservation Society; Sandra Aparecida Santos of Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuria; and Maria do Carmo Andrade Santos of WCS and Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul.

The study showed that the forage base of native grasses was greater in areas that were rotationally grazed and produced cattle that were 15 percent heavier with 22 percent higher pregnancy rates.

"The results of this study show a potential win-win situation for the Pantanal and Cerrado's ranches and wildlife," said the study's lead author, Donald Parsons Eaton of the Wildlife Conservation Society. "Using rotational grazing techniques will produce healthier cattle for ranchers and help safeguard wildlife that call home to this incredibly biodiverse region."

The Pantanal and Cerrado regions are home to jaguars, peccaries, giant anteaters, and 740 species of birds. The region was recently profiled in a new WCS field guide, Birds of Brazil, which documented its rich bird life and drew attention to the threats these regions face from agribusiness and overdevelopment.

Many areas of the Pantanal and Cerrado have already been converted to large scale non-sustainable ranching operations, where native forests and savannas were replaced by exotic grasses. While these techniques sometimes produce higher profits in the short term, they leave behind an impoverished, deforested landscape prone to erosion and drought, threatening wildlife conservation, cattle health, and herd production.

"The timing of this study couldn't have been much better," said Mariana Varese, WCS acting director for Latin America and Caribbean Program. "We look forward to working with Brazil's ranching community to apply the results of this study for the benefit of wildlife and ranchers."


'/>"/>

Contact: Stephen Sautner
ssautner@wcs.org
718-220-3682
Wildlife Conservation Society
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Grazing animals help spread plant disease
2. Alperujo -- a beneficial complement in diet of dairy sheep during non-grazing periods
3. ARS scientists study effects of grazing on grouse habitat
4. How grazing lands influence greenhouse gas
5. SU biologist partners with National Park Service to study bison grazing in Yellowstone
6. Are we trading energy conservation for toxic air emissions?
7. Case Western Reserve University project ties soil conservation and river management together
8. North American environmental commission launches trinational vaquita conservation plan
9. Conservation International gets support from Dreamworks Animation to protect giant pandas
10. Natural Capital Project to develop conservation software
11. Smithsonian scientists receive coveted BBVA Ecology and Conservation Award
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Grazing as a conservation tool
(Date:3/27/2017)... , March 27, 2017  Catholic Health ... and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics for achieving ... Adoption Model sm . In addition, CHS previously ... U.S. hospitals using an electronic medical record (EMR). ... its high level of EMR usage in an ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... DUBLIN , Mar. 23, 2017 Research ... Anti-Theft System Market Analysis & Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" ... ... to grow at a CAGR of around 8.8% over the next ... This industry report analyzes the market estimates and forecasts for all ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... 2017 At this year,s CeBIT Chancellor Dr. ... DERMALOG. The Chancellor came to the DERMALOG stand together with the Japanese ... CeBIT partner country. At the largest German biometrics company the two government ... and iris recognition as well as DERMALOG´s multi-biometrics system.   ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/25/2017)... Linda, Ca (PRWEB) , ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... webinar in the series will explore the laboratory testing for DIC in order to ... serious hypercoagulable disorder which can occur in hospitalized patients resulting in a high degree ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... , April 25, 2017 ... ("EpiVax") has licensed its novel immune-modulating technology to an ... disease and allergy. Tregitopes, pronounced T·rej·itopes, ... human immunoglobulin by EpiVax CEO Annie De ... to intravenous immunoglobulin G, an autoimmune disease therapy, ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... Leaders of Quorum ... will be featured in multiple sessions at this week’s Association of Clinical Research ... to best practices in clinical research. , "We are excited to present subject matter ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The 2017 Colorado Manufacturing Awards celebrates Innovation ... and well as the first-year award for 2017 Manufacturing Women of the Year. ... by CompanyWeek and Manufacturers Edge, among other sponsors. , The Colorado Manufacturing ...
Breaking Biology Technology: