Navigation Links
Genetics can explain why infections can trigger rheumatoid arthritis
Date:3/26/2014

A new international study has revealed how genetics could explain why different environmental exposures can trigger the onset of different forms of rheumatoid arthritis.

A team at the Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics at The University of Manchester, part of a large international consortium involving scientists from across 15 academic institutions, believe their findings could have important implication for the way that rheumatoid arthritis is diagnosed and treated.

Publishing their findings in the journal American Journal of Human Genetics, they say that more accurate clinical testing is now needed to better identify the less-well understood type of rheumatoid arthritis and to prevent it being misdiagnosed.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a serious inflammatory form of arthritis, affecting almost 400,000 people in the UK, which causes painful, swollen joints, and in severe cases, considerable disability. It is known to have strong genetic and environmental components.

It was already known that a proportion of rheumatoid arthritis patients test positive for autoantibodies, whilst about 30% remain sero-negative. In this study, the researchers have better defined the genetic distinction between these two disease subtypes: sero-positive and sero-negative rheumatoid arthritis.

They have now established that different genetic variants of a protein that plays a vital role in how the body's immune system fights infection are associated with the two forms of rheumatoid arthritis. This provides clues to the theory that exposure to different infectious agents, such as bacteria or viruses, trigger the different forms of rheumatoid arthritis in susceptible individuals. Sero-negative rheumatoid is less well understood than sero-positive, and patients who have this type of arthritis can be misdiagnosed, leading to inappropriate treatment.

Dr Steve Eyre from the genetics and genomics centre in Manchester commented: "We recognise that rheumatoid arthritis is a complex disease that can have variable presentation and outcomes for different people, in particular in the way they respond to treatment. These findings add to our ability to genetically define subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis, which is an important step towards selecting the best treatment for each patient."

Centre director Professor Jane Worthington added: "Now that we have established a genetic basis for these two types of rheumatoid arthritis, we hope it will lead to patients receiving a swifter, accurate diagnosis and more appropriate, targeted treatment. These findings have opened the door to a better understanding of sero-negative rheumatoid arthritis."


'/>"/>
Contact: Jane Tadman
j.tadman@arthritisresearchuk.org
44-124-654-1107
University of Manchester
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Fly meeting to spotlight research advances in genetics
2. New tool to unlock genetics of grape-growing
3. Genetics linked to children viewing high amounts of violent media
4. Genetics Society of America selects 5 geneticists to receive societys 2014 Awards
5. David Allis, pioneer in epigenetics, to receive prestigious Japan Prize
6. Complimentary press registration now open for ACMG 2014 Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting
7. Epigenetics enigma resolved
8. Genetics Society of America announces recipients of spring 2014 DeLill Nasser Award
9. Environment drives genetics in Evolution Canyon; discovery sheds light on climate change
10. Epigenetics by Lyle Armstrong -- Now available
11. Air pollution and genetics combine to increase risk for autism
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/5/2017)... 5, 2017  The Allen Institute for Cell Science ... a one-of-a-kind portal and dynamic digital window into the ... the first application of deep learning to create predictive ... lines and a growing suite of powerful tools. The ... and future publicly available resources created and shared by ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... , March 30, 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, ... the Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in ... competition will focus on developing health and wellness apps ... Hack the Genome is the first hackathon ... The world,s largest companies in the genomics, tech and ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... March 27, 2017  Catholic Health Services (CHS) ... Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics for achieving Stage 6 ... sm . In addition, CHS previously earned a ... using an electronic medical record (EMR). ... level of EMR usage in an outpatient setting.  ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... A ... pregnancy rates in frozen and fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF) transfer ... age to IVF success. , After comparing the results from the fresh and ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... 2017 , ... For the second time in three years, ... Award. Representatives of the FirstHand program travelled to Washington, D.C. Tuesday, October 10th, ... mission is to change the trajectory of STEM education in America by dramatically ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... USDM Life Sciences , ... life sciences and healthcare industries, announces a presentation by Subbu Viswanathan and Jennifer ... “Automating GxP Validation for Agile Cloud Platforms,” will present a revolutionary approach to ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 09, 2017 , ... At its ... Dr. Christopher Stubbs, a professor in Harvard University’s Departments of Physics and Astronomy, has ... was a member of the winning team for the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental ...
Breaking Biology Technology: