Navigation Links
Genetic variation linked to sugary food
Date:5/13/2008

Bethesda, MDA new study released today in the online edition of Physiological Genomics finds that individuals with a specific genetic variation consistently consume more sugary foods. The study offers the first evidence of the role that a variation in the GLUT2 gene a gene that controls sugar entry into the cells has on sugar intake, and may help explain individual preferences for foods high in sugar.

The study was conducted by Ahmed El-Sohemy, Karen M. Eny, Thomas M.S. Wolever and Benedicte Fontaine-Bisson, all of the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Their study, entitled Genetic Variant in the Glucose Transporter Type 2 (GLUT 2) is Associated with Higher Intakes of Sugars in Two Distinct Populations, appears in the May 2008 edition of Physiological Genomics (http://physiolgenomics.physiology.org/).

Summary of the Study

Food preferences are influenced by the environment as well as genetics. Cravings for foods high in sugar vary from person to person, but the reasons why are still unclear. To better understand the mechanism, the research team examined the effect of a common variation in a gene that controls the entry of sugar (glucose) into cells. The gene is called glucose transporter type 2 or GLUT2.

The researchers tested the effects of the genetic variation in two distinct populations. One population consisted of older adults who were all either overweight or obese. The other population consisted of generally healthy young adults who were mostly lean.

The diet of the participants in the first population was assessed by recording all of the foods and beverages consumed over a three day period, and repeating this 3-day food record two weeks later to ensure that the effect was reproducible. All participants were interviewed face-to-face during the two visits to the research centers. For the second population, the study participants used a questionnaire that asked about the foods and beverages typically consumed during a one month period.

Blood was drawn from each participant, and their DNA extracted. The researchers examined the genotype distribution and compared the food intake data each participant provided between individuals with the variation and those without the variation in GLUT2. The DNA samples that carried the variation in GLUT2 were associated with consuming more sugars in both populations studied.

Findings

The results of the study showed that a genetic variation of GLUT2 is associated with differences in the habitual consumption of sugars both within and between two distinct populations. Specifically:

  • those individuals with the GLUT2 variation consistently consumed more sugars (sucrose (table sugar)), fructose (simple sugar such as corn syrup) and glucose (carbohydrates), regardless of age or sex.

  • the two sets of food records from the older group showed that the older individuals with the variation consumed more sugars than their non-variant older counterparts (112 9 vs. 864 grams of sugar per day and 1118 vs. 82 4 grams per day).

  • the individuals in the younger population who carried the variant were found to consume more sweetened beverages (0.490.05 vs. 0.340.02 servings per day) and more sweets (1.450.10 vs. 1.080.05 servings per day) than their non-variant counterparts.

  • there were no differences in the amount of protein, fat, starch or alcohol that was consumed by those either with or without the variant.

Conclusions

According to Dr. El-Sohemy, the studys senior researcher, We have found that a variation in the GLUT2 gene is associated with a higher intake of sugars among different populations. These findings may help explain some of the individual variations in peoples preference for sugary foods. Its especially important given the soaring rates of obesity and diabetes throughout much of the world.


'/>"/>

Contact: Donna Krupa
DKrupa@the-aps.org
301-634-7209
American Physiological Society
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists dig deeper into the genetics of schizophrenia by evaluating microRNAs
2. Genetic tag team keeps cells on cycle
3. The cooperative view: New evidence suggests a symbiogenetic origin for the centrosome
4. Second genetic link to weight and obesity
5. Genetic breakthrough explains dangerously high blood glucose levels
6. Epigenetic research uncovers new targets for modification enzymes
7. Mapping the genetic locus for triglycerides
8. Genetic sequencing of protein from T. rex bone confirms dinosaurs link to birds
9. American College of Medical Genetics makes genetic testing recommendations in new policy statement
10. Scientists clarify a mechanism of epigenetic inheritance
11. Genetic variant mimics effect of heart failure medications
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/9/2016)... Feb. 9, 2016 Aware, Inc. (NASDAQ: AWRE ), ... results for its fourth quarter and year ended December 31, 2015.  ... the fourth quarter of 2015 was $6.9 million, an increase of ... Operating income in the fourth quarter of 2015 was $2.6 million ... --> --> Higher revenue and ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , February 8, 2016 ... platform which presents innovation for clients, comfort and ... called VoiceKey. --> Worldcore is ... innovation for clients, comfort and unbeatable security, with ... --> Worldcore is the first ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... , Feb. 4, 2016 The field ... one of the most popular hubs of the ... and other huge studies of human microbiota, have ... few years, the microbiome space has literally exploded ... research. This report focuses on biomedical aspects ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... Calif. , Feb. 11, 2016  Dovetail Genomics™ ... to its beta program for a planned metagenomic genome ... present the company,s metagenomic genome assembly method in a ... in Genome Biology & Technology conference in ... of these highly complex datasets is difficult. Using its ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... stem cell treatment clinic in Quito, Ecuador. The new facility will provide advanced ... to patients from around the world. , The new GSCG clinic is ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... 2016 ASAE is introducing a hybrid membership ... (AMC) the option of joining or renewing through an ... by staff size, every employee in any size association ... reap all available member benefits.   John ... membership options will allow organizations of any size and ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Austin, Texas (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 ... ... research centers across three states, announced today the promotion of two long-standing principal ... and Chief of Family Medicine, Clinical Research and Development. , Dr. Laurence Chu, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: