Navigation Links
Gene therapy protocol at UCSD activates immune system in patients with leukemia
Date:2/11/2008

A research team at the Moores Cancer Center at University of California, San Diego (UCSD) reports that patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who were treated with a gene therapy protocol began making antibodies that reacted against their own leukemia cells. The study will be published on line the week of February 11-15 in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

Researchers led by Thomas J. Kipps, M.D., Ph.D., inserted a gene with the potential to activate an immune response a gene therapy protocol developed at UCSD into six patients with CLL, the most common form of adult leukemia. Several of the patients started making antibodies that reacted against their own leukemia cells. When tested in the lab, the antibodies also reacted with the leukemia cells of other patients with the disease.

The patients own leukemia cells were modified outside of their body and given back as a vaccine, said Kipps. The result raises hope that it may be possible to activate a patients immune system against their own cancer.

The patients were shown to make antibodies reactive with a leukemia-associated antigen a protein made by leukemia cells that can stimulate the body's immune system to produce antibodies called ROR1. This antigen appears to be found only on the cell surface of the leukemia cells, but not on normal cells, and serves as a receptor that binds to a ligand called Wnt5a, which activates a pathway important for the survival of the leukemia cells.

The Wnt5a ligand interacts with ROR1 to enhance leukemia-cell survival. Antibodies that react with ROR1 can interfere with this survival signal and might also specifically target the leukemia cells for destruction, Kipps said.

He also noted that because the ROR1 antigen is found only on leukemia cells, it could be developed as a very specific marker to monitor for the continued presence of leukemia cells after treatment or for identifying leukemia cells in patients with early disease, when the cancer otherwise might not be detected. It also provides a much more specific target for antibody therapy. Antibodies that target ROR1 would be unlike currently used antibodies, which bind antigens found not only on leukemia cells, but also on normal cells. Because they can destroy normal cells, the antibodies currently used to treat patients with this leukemia can cause side-effects and weaken the immune system.

The ROR1 antigen is ordinarily found on a few cells in early embryonic development and is not detected on adult human cells or tissues. However, high amounts of this antigen are found on all the leukemia cells of patients with CLL. In the PNAS paper, the UCSD researchers present data on the leukemia cells of approximately 70 patients, all of which expressed the ROR1 antigen.


'/>"/>

Contact: Debra Kain
ddkain@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Diseases
2. A search for protection against chemotherapy cardiotoxicity
3. Top scientists meet for global conference on stem cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases
4. RNA interference therapy heals growth deficiency disorder in a live animal
5. Safer, more accurate radiation therapy for expecting mothers
6. Cancer and arthritis therapy may be promising treatment for diabetes
7. Dolphin therapy a dangerous fad, Emory researchers warn
8. Ireland Cancer Center researchers advance stem cell gene therapy
9. Safe and effective therapy discovered for patients with protein-losing enteropathy
10. Fourth Annual International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Diseases
11. Gene, stem cell therapy only needs to be 50 percent effective to create a healthy heart
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/15/2016)... , March 15, 2016 ... report published by Transparency Market Research "Digital Door Lock Systems ... Forecast 2015 - 2023," the global digital door lock systems ... Mn in 2014 and is forecast to grow at a ... of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) across the world ...
(Date:3/11/2016)... Germany , March 11, 2016 http://www.apimages.com ... - Cross reference: Picture is available at AP Images ( http://www.apimages.com ... from DERMALOG will be used to produce the new refugee identity ... other biometric innovations, at CeBIT in Hanover ... scanner from DERMALOG will be used to produce the new refugee ...
(Date:3/9/2016)... NEW YORK , March 9, 2016 ... current and future states of the RNA Sequencing (RNA ... in segments such as instruments, tools and reagents, data ... Analyze various segments of the RNA-Sequencing market such ... RNA-Sequencing services Identify the main factors affecting each segment ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... May 27, 2016 At present, the ... in this space know that volatility is what makes this ... on ActiveWallSt.com: Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp. (NASDAQ: SNTA ), ... (NASDAQ: LPTN ), and Heat Biologics Inc. (NASDAQ: ... to the technical alerts for these stocks at: ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... and READING, England , ... ( http://www.indegene.com ), a leading global provider of ... pharmaceutical and healthcare organisations and TranScrip ( http://www.transcrip-partners.com ... support throughout the product lifecycle, today announced the ... of IntraScience.      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141208/720248 ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... May 26, 2016 Despite the volatility ... in this space. Today,s pre-market research on ActiveWallSt.com directs the ... Inc. (NASDAQ: RDUS ), Cerus Corp. (NASDAQ: ... ), and Five Prime Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: FPRX ... at: http://www.activewallst.com/ On Wednesday, ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... and manufacturing company, today announced several positive developments that position the Company for ... a result of the transaction, Craig F. Kinghorn has been appointed Chairman of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: