Navigation Links
Gene discovery could improve treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
Date:8/13/2012

August 13, 2012 ─ (BRONX, NY) ─ Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have made a discovery involving mice and humans that could mean that people with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a usually fatal cancer, are a step closer to new treatment options. Their study results were published online today in Cancer Cell.

"We have discovered that a gene called HLX is expressed at abnormally high levels in leukemia stem cells in a mouse model of AML," said Ulrich Steidl, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of cell biology and of medicine at Einstein and senior author of the paper. (Gene expression is the process by which a gene synthesizes the molecule that it codes for; an "over-expressed" gene makes its product in abnormally high amounts.)

According to the National Cancer Institute, AML will be diagnosed in one of every 254 people during their lifetime. Most die within a few years of diagnosis. For the last several decades there has been little improvement in the survival rate for AML patients.

Dr. Steidl and his colleagues found that over-expression of the HLX gene in mice caused blood-forming stem cells to become dysfunctional and develop into abnormal progenitors (biological ancestors) of white blood cells that failed to differentiate into normal blood cells. Instead, those early, abnormal white cells formed duplicates of themselves.

The researchers then analyzed HLX expression data collected from 354 AML patients and found that 87 percent of them were over-expressing HLX compared with HLX expression in healthy individuals. And among patients expressing HLX at high levels in an even larger cohort of 601 patients: the greater their degree of HLX expression, the worse their survival chances.

Importantly, when Dr. Steidl's team used a laboratory technique to "knock down" HLX expression in AML cells taken from a mouse model of AML and from AML patients, proliferation of leukemia cells was greatly suppressed in both cases. And when the researchers knocked down HLX expression in mouse AML cells and human AML cells and then transplanted both types of cancer cells into healthy mice, those mice lived significantly longer compared with mice that received unaltered AML cells.

These findings suggest that targeting elevated HLX expression may be a promising novel strategy for treating AML.

"HLX is clearly a key factor in causing the over-production of white cells that occurs in AML," said Dr. Steidl. "Our research is still in its early stages, but we're looking towards developing drugsso we can improve treatment for AML and possibly other types of cancer." Einstein has filed a patent application related to this research. The HLX technology is available for licensing.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kimberly Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New discovery of how carbon is stored in the Southern Ocean
2. Gene discovery set to help with mysterious paralysis of childhood
3. 3-D tumor models improve drug discovery success rate
4. OHSU discovery may lead to new treatment for ALS
5. Groundbreaking discovery of mechanism that controls obesity, atherosclerosis
6. Discovery may lead to new tomato varieties with vintage flavor and quality
7. 7 pharmaceutical companies join academic researchers to speed TB drug discovery
8. Discovery increases understanding how bacteria spread: U of A study
9. NSF Leadership in Discovery and Innovation sparks White House US Ignite Initiative
10. Groundbreaking discovery of the cellular origin of cervical cancer
11. Astellas and DNDi to collaborate on new drug discovery research for the treatment of NTDs
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... , April 28, 2016 First quarter 2016: ... up 966% compared with the first quarter of 2015 ... SEK 589.1 M (loss: 18.8) and the operating margin was 40% ... 0.32) Cash flow from operations was SEK 249.9 M ... revenue guidance is unchanged, SEK 7,000-8,500 M. The operating ...
(Date:4/15/2016)...  A new partnership announced today will help ... in a fraction of the time it takes ... life insurance policies to consumers without requiring inconvenient ... Diagnostics, rapid testing (A1C, Cotinine and HIV) and ... weight, pulse, BMI, and activity data) available at ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... 2016   LegacyXChange, ... "Company") LegacyXChange is excited to release its ... to be launched online site for trading 100% guaranteed ... will also provide potential shareholders a sense of the ... an industry that is notorious for fraud. The video ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... City, Missouri (PRWEB) , ... May 27, 2016 , ... ... Development Manager, Turf and Ornamental Products. , In his 15-year career with PBI-Gordon, Dave ... Herbicide Product Manager, where he was integral in the development and launch of many ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... At present, the Biotech sphere is ... know that volatility is what makes this industry interesting to ... Pharmaceuticals Corp. (NASDAQ: SNTA ), CTI BioPharma Corp. ... LPTN ), and Heat Biologics Inc. (NASDAQ: HTBX ... alerts for these stocks at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/ ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Q BioMed Inc. (OTCQB: QBIO), a biotechnology acceleration ... at the 5th Annual Marcum MicroCap Conference on Thursday, June ... at the Grand Hyatt Hotel. The Company,s presentation ... scheduled to begin at 11a.m ET in the Broadway Room. ... and outline milestones for the balance of 2016 and beyond. ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Kinder Scientific (KinderScientific.com), ... developments that position the Company for the future. Kinder Scientific announces restructured ... Kinghorn has been appointed Chairman of the Board, Curtis D. Kinghorn has been ...
Breaking Biology Technology: