Navigation Links
GW researcher finds connection in pathogenesis of neurological diseases, HIV
Date:2/4/2014

WASHINGTON (Feb. 4, 2014) A new study by George Washington University (GW) researcher Michael Bukrinsky, M.D., Ph.D., shows similarities in the pathogenesis of prion disease misfolded proteins that can lead to neurological diseases and the HIV virus.

The research, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, looks at the relationship between cholesterol metabolism and prion infection as a follow-up to previous research on the relationship between cholesterol metabolism and HIV. Bukrinsky, a professor of microbiology, immunology, and tropical medicine at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and his research team found a striking relationship between impairment of cellular cholesterol transporter ABCA1 and the conversion of prion into the pathological form, which occurs in lipid rafts the membrane domains of neuronal cells.

"The effect of prions on ABCA1 and lipid rafts is very similar to what we found with HIV before, suggesting that while prions and viruses are very different, they seem to target the same cellular mechanism of cholesterol metabolism," said Bukrinsky. "This mechanism may be key to controlling many different diseases. It may be that drugs that stimulate ABCA1 can help not only to target prions and HIV, but also a number of other pathogens."

Under normal circumstances, an abundance of ABCA1 limits the number of lipid rafts and vice versa. With prions, the opposite effect takes place. During the conversion of prions into a pathogenic form, an abundance of ABCA1 in cells increases, but so does the amount of lipid rafts. The reason for this paradox is that ABCA1 in prion-infected cells is non-functional. The researchers found that ABCA1 was displaced from the plasma membrane and from lipid rafts by prions and was internalized, inhibiting its function. Stimulation of ABCA1 with drugs inhibited conversion of prions from non-pathogenic to pathogenic form, reducing the number of lipid rafts in the cell, and opening the possibility of treating prion disease with these drugs.

Bukrinsky and his research team also found that when cells are loaded with cholesterol, it likewise counteracts this effect of prions on ABCA1 and lipid metabolism in a cell. While in most circumstances having lots of lipids and fats in one's diet is not recommended, this finding suggests that being loaded with fat actually stops the conversion of prions from the non-pathogenic to pathogenic form. Neuronal cells loaded with lipids are actually less prone to becoming susceptible to prion disease. "This isn't a recommendation as we are talking about a very specific cell type and under special circumstances," said Bukrinsky, "but it's an interesting possibility."


'/>"/>

Contact: Lisa Anderson
lisama2@gwu.edu
202-994-3121
George Washington University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Study by UC Santa Barbara researchers suggests that bacteria communicate by touch
2. UC Santa Barbara researchers discover genetic link between visual pathways of hydras and humans
3. Study jointly led by UCSB researcher supports theory of extraterrestrial impact
4. U of Alberta researcher steps closer to understand autoimmune diseases
5. Researchers attempt to solve problems of antibiotic resistance and bee deaths in one
6. UNH researchers find African farmers need better climate change data to improve farming practices
7. Ottawa researchers to lead world-first clinical trial of stem cell therapy for septic shock
8. Researchers uncover molecular pathway through which common yeast becomes fungal pathogen
9. Researchers print live cells with a standard inkjet printer
10. Columbia Engineering and Penn researchers increase speed of single-molecule measurements
11. Researchers reveal how a single gene mutation leads to uncontrolled obesity
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/15/2016)... 15, 2016 Research and ... Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to their offering.  , ... , ,The global gait biometrics market is expected ... the period 2016-2020. Gait analysis generates ... be used to compute factors that are not ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... , March 31, 2016 ... ) ("LegacyXChange" or the "Company") LegacyXChange is ... users of its soon to be launched online site ... https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyTLBzmZogV1y2D6bDkBX5g ) will also provide potential shareholders ... of DNA technology to an industry that is notorious ...
(Date:3/23/2016)... 23, 2016 ... Gesichts- und Stimmerkennung mit Passwörtern     ... MESG ), ein führender Anbieter digitaler ... mit SpeechPro zusammenarbeitet, um erstmals dessen Biometrietechnologie ... die Möglichkeit angeboten, im Rahmen mobiler Apps ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... ... Lady had been battling arthritis since the age of two and at ... owner Hannah sought the help of Dr Jeff Christiansen of Superior Veterinary Surgical ... and help with the pain of Lady’s arthritis. Dr Christiansen suggested that in conjunction ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... Last week, Callan Capital, an ... and entrepreneurs, held The Future of San Diego Life Science event at the Estancia ... science community attended the event with speakers Dr. Rich Heyman, former CEO of Aragon ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... Zimmer Biomet Holdings, Inc. (NYSE and SIX: ZBH), a global ... Directors has approved the payment of a quarterly cash dividend ... The cash dividend of $0.24 per share will be ... record as of the close of business on June 24, ... the Board of Directors and may be adjusted as business ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... May 23, 2016 , ... ... molecular nanotechnology, announced the winners for the 2015 Foresight Institute Feynman Prizes. ... given in two categories, one for experiment and the other for theory in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: