Navigation Links
'Forrest Gump' mice show too much of a good thing, can be bad
Date:6/20/2013

A line of genetically modified mice that Western University scientists call "Forrest Gump" because, like the movie character, they can run far but they aren't smart, is furthering the understanding of a key neurotransmitter called acetylcholine (ACh). Marco Prado and his team at Robarts Research Institute say the mice show what happens when too much of this neurotransmitter becomes available in the brain. Boosting ACh is a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease because it's found in reduced amounts when there's cognitive failure. Prado's research is published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

"We wanted to know what happens if you have more of the gene which controls how much acetylcholine is secreted by neurons," says Prado, a Robarts scientist and professor in the Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology and Anatomy and Cell Biology at Western's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry. "The response was the complete opposite of what we expected. It's not a good thing. Acetylcholine release was increased threefold in these mice, which seemed to disturb cognitive function. But put them on a treadmill and they can run twice as far as normal mice before tiring. They're super-athletes." In addition to its function in modulating cognitive abilities, ACh drives muscle contraction which allowed for the marked improvement in motor endurance.

One of the tests the scientists, including first author Benjamin Kolisnyk, used is called the touch screen test for mice which uses technology similar to a tablet. After initiating the test, the mice have to scan five different spots on the touch screen to see a light flash, and then run and touch that area. If they get it right they get a reward. Compared to the control mice, the "Forrest Gump" mice failed miserably at the task. The researchers found the mice, which have the scientific name ChAT-ChR2-EYFP, had terrible attention spans, as well as dysfunction in working memory and spatial memory.

Prado interprets the research as showing ACh is very important for differentiating cues. So if your brain is presented with a lot of simultaneous information, it helps to pick what's important. But when you flood the brain with ACh, your brain loses the ability to discern what's relevant. This study was funded mainly by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kathy Wallis
kwallis3@uwo.ca
519-661-2111 x81136
University of Western Ontario
Source:Eurekalert

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/30/2017)... -- Trends, opportunities and forecast in this market to ... AFIS, iris recognition, facial recognition, hand geometry, vein recognition, ... industry (government and law enforcement, commercial and retail, health ... and by region ( North America , ... , and the Rest of the World) ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... , Mar 24, 2017 Research and Markets ... System Market Analysis & Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" ... ... grow at a CAGR of around 15.1% over the next decade ... industry report analyzes the market estimates and forecasts for all the ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... Vigilant Solutions , a vehicle location ... announced today the appointment of retired FBI special agent ... business development. Mr. Sheridan brings more than ... focus on the aviation transportation sector, to his new ... Sheridan served as the Aviation Liaison Agent Coordinator (ALAC) ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... ... April 18, 2017 , ... A number of new ... webinar, which is part of the Protein and Cell Analysis Education Webinar Series ... where this technology fits in current and future applications. , Many flow cytometers ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... , ... April 19, 2017 , ... ... Series A-1 financing round. This event adds to several other early achievements at ... Executive and Scientific Teams. , ThermaGenix will use proceeds from the ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... 19, 2017  As a Bronze Sponsor ... Summit ,  Proove┬« Biosciences, Inc. announces the ... and lifestyle factors to accurately predict prescription opioid ... Southern California (USC), the Interventional Pain Institute in ... results showing that Proove Opioid Risk┬« accurately identifies ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... ... April 18, 2017 , ... METTLER TOLEDO Process Analytics announces ... and vice-versa. , One of the key applications for the measurement of electrolytic ... monitoring. The principle of this analytical method is based on pure salts and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: