Navigation Links
Food for thought: delivering the promise of food processing
Date:1/4/2008

Humans have transformed raw ingredients into food since prehistoric times. But scientists are still looking for new ways to make food taste better and survive longer. Presenting their findings at a recent European Science Foundation (ESF) and European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST) conference, scientists show how new food technologies are changing European diets.

The industrial revolution brought the advent of modern food processing technology. Whether you credit the Frenchman Nicholas Appert in 1809, or British born Peter Durand in 1810, the invention of the tin can has revolutionised the way people eat. The motivation behind its invention was simple make food last long. Two hundred years on, food scientists are still trying to improve the shelf life of food.

For example, by introducing mixtures of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide into packaging, some fresh vegetables have had their life extended two- or three-fold. A similar approach is used in the packaging of meat, where gas is pumped into packaging, reducing oxygenation of the meats pigments, extending its shelf life.

But todays food scientists have to consider more than just the use-by-date. Europeans want food that is cheap, convenient, high quality, safe and more and more produced in a eco-friendly way, explains Professor Brian McKenna, a food scientist at University College Dublin in Ireland. In addition, McKenna thinks that food plays a variety of roles in European society nowadays. Food is important to peoples health as it is increasingly being linked to diseases such as obesity, coronary heart disease and diabetes, he says. Furthermore, Europeans are now more aware of the cultural role of food in every day life. So food scientists must design technology that helps people get what they want from their food.

While increased interest over food can deliver more choice for consumers, it has also led to some misinformed debates
'/>"/>

Contact: Astrid Lunkes
alunkes@esf.org
33-388-762-172
European Science Foundation
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Nanotube-producing bacteria show manufacturing promise
2. Summer-dormant tall fescue grass shows promise for pasture improvements
3. Sweet potato shines as new promise for small enterprise and hunger relief in developing countries
4. Genetic ancestral testing cannot deliver on its promise, study warns
5. New genetic research into nicotine addiction shows promise for personalized treatment
6. Tiny tubes and rods show promise as catalysts, sunscreen
7. New CPR promises better results by compressing abdomen, not Chest
8. Innovative civil engineering application promises cleaner waters
9. Raydiance collaborates with Rutgers, MTF to develop innovative tissue processing approaches
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/29/2014)... different types of cell, including sperm, bacteria and ... flagella. These protrusions, about one-hundredth of a millimetre ... through fluid. Similar, shorter structures called cilia are ... they perform roles such as moving liquids over ... remarkably versatile: they transport mucus and expel pathogens ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... of two additional coral communities showing signs of damage from ... the 2010 spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The discovery ... of biology at Penn State University. A paper describing this ... the Gulf of Mexico will be published during the last ... the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... Millions of people in the United States have a ... It can be painful and may even require surgery ... skeletal muscle wasting and, in turn, limb amputation. , ... Houston (UTHealth) Medical School, scientists tested a non-surgical preventative ... it was associated with increased blood circulation. Their ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Microscopic rowing -- without a cox 2Microscopic rowing -- without a cox 3Impact of Deepwater Horizon oil spill on coral is deeper and broader than predicted 2Scientists discover genetic switch that can prevent peripheral vascular disease in mice 2
... A Senior Design team at Stevens Institute of Technology ... often arise during thoracic surgeries. Five undergraduate Biomedical Engineering ... issues of existing catheter design and introduces a potentially ... 21, the efforts of the Stevens Innovative Fluid Extraction ...
... Los Angeles, Calif., May 22, 2011Some men of African ... cancer, according to research conducted at the Keck School of ... genome-wide association study, published in the journal Nature Genetics ... prostate cancer in men of African descent, who tend to ...
... automated microfluidic cell culture platform to monitor the growth, ... (HSCs) at the single cell level. This ... culture conditions simultaneously and to gain new insights on ... "The ability to perform massively parallel cultures of single ...
Cached Biology News:Stevens thoracic catheter senior design team takes 1st place at regional ISPE competition 2Stevens thoracic catheter senior design team takes 1st place at regional ISPE competition 3USC research determines apparent genetic link to prostate cancer in African-American men 2UBC-led team develops platform to monitor hematopoietic stem cells 2
(Date:7/29/2014)... , July 29, 2014 ... Scanners (Whole Slide Imaging), Analytics (Image Analysis Software), Delivery ... - Global Forecasts & Trends to 2018", published by ... restraints in geographies such as North America ... Asia , and the Rest of the World ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... , July 29, 2014  ImmunoClin Corporation (IMCL) ... medicine, treatment of infectious diseases as well as ... and prevention of pathologies like cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer,s ... 2014, ImmunoClin Corporation will complete the strategic relocation ... D.C. , a key center of North ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... , July 29, 2014  Sigma-Aldrich Corporation (NASDAQ: ... energy use, increased its investment in Green Chemistry and ... the world last year, the Company announced Monday in ... Science Changed the World? The report ... honors for being a responsible corporate citizen, including recognition ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... (PRWEB) July 29, 2014 The first ... a next generation approach to robotics. What sets Droidles ... patent pending technology that allows them to communicate, share ... wirelessly over the internet. , “The invention is the ... the little Droidles a life of their own, both ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Digital Pathology Market worth $437 Million by 2018 2Digital Pathology Market worth $437 Million by 2018 3ImmunoClin Corporation (IMCL) Relocates Corporate Headquarters to Washington, DC 2ImmunoClin Corporation (IMCL) Relocates Corporate Headquarters to Washington, DC 3Sigma-Aldrich Achieves Record Success in Environmental, Community Initiatives 2Sigma-Aldrich Achieves Record Success in Environmental, Community Initiatives 3Droidles, the Social Network of Robots and Open Source Platform for the Internet of Things, Launches for Crowd Funding on IndieGoGo.com 2
... A ... into specific T cell lineages to the activity of a single gene encoding a transcription ... the development of blood cells lineages. , ... (PRWeb UK) July 1, 2010 -- A research team in Japan has linked ...
... , WALTHAM, Mass. , July 1 ... multi-year collaborative agreement with Roche to apply X-Chem,s proprietary ... several of Roche,s high-value therapeutic targets. As part of ... research payments, success-based discovery milestones, and technology access fees. ...
... CLEVELAND , June 30 RSB Spine, LLC, a medical ... of degenerative disc disease, today announced a 50% sales increase for the ... sequentially. Additionally, the company reported record sales for the month of June. ... RSB Spine Chief Executive ...
Cached Biology Technology:The Last Checkpoint to T Cell Fate 2X-Chem and Roche Enter Into Drug Discovery Collaboration and License Agreement 2