Navigation Links
Fink receives Gruber Genetics Prize, lectures at American Society of Human Genetics annual meeting
Date:11/2/2010

November 4, New York, NY No one knows better "The Promise of Human Genetics" than the man who will address that topic at a conference in Washington D.C. on Wednesday: this year's Gruber Genetics Prize recipient Prof. Gerald R. Fink.

It is Fink who discovered how to "grow" genes in yeast, thus allowing scientists to create and study a never‐ending series of DNA scenarios and track how cells inherit information. It is Fink whose "transforming" technique effectively opened a biological factory to produce insulin, vaccines and other medical products. It is Fink and his colleagues who discerned the genetic mechanisms by which certain disease‐bearing fungi switch from benign to infectious, thereby setting the stage for an unprecedented defense of the immune system. And it is Fink who has generously shared his work with other scientists and who continues to teach the next generation of researchers.

He will deliver the Gruber Lecture at the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, immediately after accepting the $500,000 Genetics Prize from The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation.

The son of a medical doctor, Fink was born in New York 70 years ago. He majored in biology at Amherst College and earned his PhD in genetics from Yale University. He taught at Cornell University for 15 years before moving to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1982, where he continues to research and teach. He is also associated with the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research.

Additional Information:

The official citation to the Prize reads: The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation proudly presents the 2010 Genetics Prize to Gerald R. Fink, Ph.D., a founder of modern yeast genetics and a leader in the use of model‐organism genetics to study diverse biological problems. Fink developed a system that allows insertions of laboratory‐modified‐DNA molecules into their natural locations in the yeast chromosomes. His breakthrough technique enabled the genetic dissection of basic cellular processes and the manufacture of drugs and vaccines in yeast, as well as inspiring similar approaches to the genetic manipulation of diverse organisms.

Fink applied the "awesome power" of the new yeast genetics to discover how genomic information is transcribed, recombined, suppressed, transposed, and translated. In his own laboratory, he trained a legion of leading geneticists to apply yeast genetics to advance biomedical science, and inspired many more to do so through his teaching and writing.


'/>"/>

Contact: Alyson O'Mahoney
aomahoney@robinleedyassociates.com
914-241-0086
Robin Leedy & Associates, Inc.
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. U of I receives $1.5 million to further sustainability in ornamental crop production
2. La Jolla Institute scientist Klaus Ley receives Malpighi award
3. BMC receives National Institutes of Health grant to study intrauterine cocaine and substance reslience
4. Virginia Techs Mueller receives friendship award from China
5. Aeras-led research consortium receives FDA support
6. UNC scientist receives NIH directors New Innovator Award
7. RIT receives federal grant to construct new sustainability research facility
8. UCLA receives $12.5M to lead international project to study proteins implicated in heart disease
9. Einstein receives $30 million to study protein form and function
10. Prof. Xiaoguang Meng receives honorary master of engineering from Stevens
11. LSU receives $15 million grant from NIH to build biomedical research pipeline for Louisiana
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/11/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... to their offering. ... eye tracking market to grow at a CAGR of 30.37% during ... Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis ... and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also ...
(Date:4/5/2017)... -- The Allen Institute for Cell Science today announces the ... and dynamic digital window into the human cell. The ... of deep learning to create predictive models of cell ... growing suite of powerful tools. The Allen Cell Explorer ... available resources created and shared by the Allen Institute ...
(Date:4/3/2017)... , April 3, 2017  Data captured ... engineering platform, detected a statistically significant association ... prior to treatment and objective response of ... potential to predict whether cancer patients will ... treatment, as well as to improve both pre-infusion ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... 2017  VMS BioMarketing, a leading provider of patient support ... Nurse Educator (CNE) network, which will launch this week. The ... health care professionals to enhance the patient care experience by ... other health care professionals to help women who have been ... ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 , ... San Diego-based ... of its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look is part ... as the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will also expand ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... SomaGenics announced the receipt of a Phase ... (Single Cell), expected to be the first commercially available ... from single cells using NGS methods. The NIH,s recent ... development of approaches to analyze the heterogeneity of cell ... for measuring levels of mRNAs in individual cells have ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... , ... At its national board meeting in North Carolina, ARCS® Foundation ... of Physics and Astronomy, has been selected for membership in ARCS Alumni Hall ... 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental physics for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: