Navigation Links
Fat and obesity gene also affects hip fracture
Date:9/24/2013

Australian researchers have demonstrated a strong association between the FTO (fat and obesity) gene and hip fracture in women. While the gene is already well known to affect diabetes and obesity, this is the first study to show that its high-risk variant can increase the risk of hip fracture by as much as 82%.

The study, undertaken by Dr Bich Tran and Professor Tuan Nguyen from Sydney's Garvan Institute of Medical Research, examined six gene variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs) of the FTO gene, taken from the DNA of 943 women in the Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study (DOES). The women were all over 60, and their bone health was followed between 1989 and 2007. During that period, 102 women had hip fractures.

On average, the risk of fracture is about 11%. The study showed that if a woman has a low-risk genotype, or gene variant, the risk of fracture is 10%. If she has a high-risk genotype, it is 16%.

Now published online in Clinical Endocrinology, the authors believe that the findings have the potential to improve prediction of hip fracture. Known risk factors, also to be taken into account, include advancing age, falls, history of fracture, low bone mineral density, low body mass index (BMI) and genetic make-up.

"We found that for a woman of the same age and same clinical risk factors, those with the high-risk genotype have an increased risk of hip fracture of 82% - a strong effect in genetic terms," said Professor Tuan Nguyen.

"A genome-wide association study published in 2007 suggested that genetic variants in the FTO gene were associated with variation in BMI. This led us to hypothesise that they might also be associated with variation in hip fracture risk, because BMI is a strong predictor of fracture."

"The present study tested our hypothesis by examining the association between common variants in the FTO gene and hip fracture."

"Our results showed a strong association with hip fracture, with some gene variants doubling the risk of fracture. Interestingly, this effect was independent of both the bone density and BMI of the women we studied."

"We also found that the FTO gene expresses in bone cells, and may have something to do with bone turnover, or remodelling, although its exact mechanisms are unclear."

"It's important to emphasise that, while promising, our finding is a first step. It will need to be replicated in other studies, and its mechanisms clearly understood before it is useful in drug development."

"At Garvan, we developed a Fracture Risk Calculator several years ago, http://www.fractureriskcalculator.com, using data from the Dubbo study. The calculator, which is fairly accurate and easy to use, is very popular with patients and doctors."

"In the future, I would anticipate that genetic risk factors including this finding would be programmed into the calculator, making it an even more finely tuned predictive tool."


'/>"/>

Contact: Alison Heather
a.heather@garvan.org.au
61-434-071-326
Garvan Institute of Medical Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Education protects women from the obesity associated with urban living
2. Rich or poor in gut bacteria brings new vision for obesity treatment
3. Vigorous physical activity linked to lower incidence of obesity in young African-American women
4. Obesity and mortality association differs between individuals with and without diabetes
5. New IOM report lays out plan to determine effectiveness of obesity prevention efforts
6. Offspring of mothers stressed during pregnancy with a passive stress coping style more prone to obesity
7. The new frontier: Creating and marketing food products that prevent disease and obesity
8. Obese dads pass on predisposition to obesity and metabolic disorders to their kids
9. New data support community-wide approach to addressing child obesity
10. CNIO researchers discover a new gene involved in obesity
11. Breakthrough research of essential molecule reveals important targets in diabetes and obesity
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/3/2016)... PUNE, India , February 3, 2016 ... to the new market research report "Automated Fingerprint Identification ... (Tenprint Search, Latent Search), Application (Banking & Finance, Government, ... 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to ... estimated CAGR of 21.0% between 2015 and 2020. The ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... 2016 This BCC Research report provides ... reviewing the recent advances in high throughput ‘omic ... field forward. Includes forecast through 2019. ... and opportunities that exist in the bioinformatic market. ... as well as IT and bioinformatics service providers. ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... 2, 2016  Based on its recent analysis ... recognizes US-based Intelligent Retinal Imaging Systems (IRIS) with ... for New Product Innovation. IRIS, a prominent cloud-based ... America , is poised to set the ... retinopathy market. The IRIS technology presents superior price-performance ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, ... ... REGN) today announced that it has joined the Human Vaccines Project, a ... infectious diseases and cancer. , The Human Vaccines Project brings together ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... Benchmark Research, a fully-integrated network ... two long-standing principal investigators (PI) to the roles of Chief Medical Officer, Clinical ... Dr. Laurence Chu, a Benchmark Research PI in the Austin office, will assume ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... registry built on the secure online PatientCrossroads platform, has exceeded both its one-year ... have joined the PROMPT study, which seeks to advance understanding of the hereditary ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... ... 09, 2016 , ... Creation Technologies, leading global provider of ... Customer Rating Award from Circuits Assembly , today announced its milestone achievement of ... Mexico and China. , The EMS provider, known in the EMS industry for ...
Breaking Biology Technology: