Navigation Links
Failure to bridle inflammation spurs atherosclerosis
Date:6/18/2008

When a person develops a sore or a boil, it erupts, drawing to it immune system cells that fight the infection. Then it resolves and flattens into the skin, often leaving behind a mark or a scar.

A similar scenario plays out in the blood vessels. However, when there is a defect in the resolution response the ability of blood vessels to recover from inflammation atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries can result, said researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and Harvard Medical School in Boston in a report that appears online today in The Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The major factor in this disease is a deficiency in the chemical signals that encourage resolution (pro-resolution signals). These signals are produced in the blood vessel where the inflammation occurs, the researchers said.

Chronic inflammation of the artery wall can cause atherosclerosis, a major risk factor for heart disease and heart attack. However, said Dr. Lawrence C.B. Chan, professor of medicine and molecular and cellular biology and chief of the division of division of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolism at BCM, in many instances, the lesions or little sores inside the artery arise and then resolve, often from a very young age. The mystery is why some lesions do not heal.

What he and his colleagues from BCM and Harvard found was that genetically increasing the production of the pro-resolution signals would cool down the inflammation and give the "sores" a chance to heal or the atherosclerosis to slow down. However, genetically clamping down on these signals would fan the fire of inflammation and speed up the progression of atherosclerosis.

"Inflammation is a two-edged sword. If resolution fails and the response gets out of hand there is a never ending civil war in the body," said Dr. Aksam J. Merched, assistant professor of molecular and cellular biology at BCM and lead author of the study. "Continued inflammation draws more macrophages (potent immune system cells) to the site of the inflammation. They produce molecules that turn this into a vicious cycle."

Dr. Charles Serhan of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, a key collaborator who first discovered many of the chemical mediators, provided special expertise in understanding the role of the mediators as well as performed analyses that allowed us to measure them accurately, said Chan.

"Resolution is not a passive process," said Chan, who is also the Betty Rutherford Chair for Diabetes Research at BCM. "It is active and produces specific anti-inflammatory mediators that 'cool down' the inflammatory process.

Some natural mediators that 'cool' this inflammation are derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are plentiful in fish and are frequently cited for their beneficial effects on the heart. Another kind of mediator is triggered by the anti-inflammation drug aspirin, said Chan.

"The specific chemical mediators that naturally cool down the inflammatory process identified in this study represent a new drug target for anti-atherosclerosis therapy," said Merched.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dipali Pathak
pathak@@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Vitamin D: New way to treat heart failure?
2. Oocyte-specific gene mutations cause premature ovarian failure
3. Jefferson receives $11.6M NIH grant to study novel mechanisms of heart failure
4. Many African-Americans have a gene that prolongs life after heart failure
5. Genetic variant mimics effect of heart failure medications
6. Certain diseases, birth defects may be linked to failure of protein recycling system
7. High blood pressure, low energy -- a recipe for heart failure
8. Inflammation triggers cell fusions that could protect neurons, Stanford research shows
9. Bleeding, not inflammation, is major cause of early lung infection death
10. Growing use of nanomaterials spurs research to investigate possible downsides
11. Lipoic acid could reduce atherosclerosis, weight gain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/2/2016)... NEW YORK , June 2, 2016   The ... (Weather), is announcing Watson Ads, an industry-first capability in which ... advertising, by being able to ask questions via voice or ... Marketers have long ... with the consumer, that can be personal, relevant and valuable; ...
(Date:6/1/2016)... , June 1, 2016 ... in Election Administration and Criminal Identification to Boost Global ... a recently released TechSci Research report, " Global Biometrics ... Region, Competition Forecast and Opportunities, 2011 - 2021", the ... billion by 2021, on account of growing security concerns ...
(Date:5/20/2016)... MINNEAPOLIS , May 20, 2016  VoiceIt ... technology partnership with VoicePass. By working ... user experience.  Because VoiceIt and VoicePass take slightly ... two engines increases both security and usability. ... expressed excitement about this new partnership. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 Epic Sciences ... detects cancers susceptible to PARP inhibitors by targeting ... cells (CTCs). The new test has already been ... in multiple cancer types. Over 230 ... damage response pathways, including PARP, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... its second eBook, “Clinical Trials Patient Recruitment and Retention Tips.” Partnering with experienced ... this eBook by providing practical tips, tools, and strategies for clinical researchers. , ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... TORONTO , June 23, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - ... Ontario biotechnology company, Propellon ... the development and commercialization of a portfolio of ... cancers. Epigenetic targets such as WDR5 represent an ... contribute significantly in precision medicine for cancer patients. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... Plate® YM (Yeast and Mold) microbial test has received AOAC Research Institute approval ... of microbial tests introduced last year,” stated Bob Salter, Vice President of Regulatory ...
Breaking Biology Technology: