Navigation Links
Failure to bridle inflammation spurs atherosclerosis
Date:6/18/2008

When a person develops a sore or a boil, it erupts, drawing to it immune system cells that fight the infection. Then it resolves and flattens into the skin, often leaving behind a mark or a scar.

A similar scenario plays out in the blood vessels. However, when there is a defect in the resolution response the ability of blood vessels to recover from inflammation atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries can result, said researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and Harvard Medical School in Boston in a report that appears online today in The Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The major factor in this disease is a deficiency in the chemical signals that encourage resolution (pro-resolution signals). These signals are produced in the blood vessel where the inflammation occurs, the researchers said.

Chronic inflammation of the artery wall can cause atherosclerosis, a major risk factor for heart disease and heart attack. However, said Dr. Lawrence C.B. Chan, professor of medicine and molecular and cellular biology and chief of the division of division of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolism at BCM, in many instances, the lesions or little sores inside the artery arise and then resolve, often from a very young age. The mystery is why some lesions do not heal.

What he and his colleagues from BCM and Harvard found was that genetically increasing the production of the pro-resolution signals would cool down the inflammation and give the "sores" a chance to heal or the atherosclerosis to slow down. However, genetically clamping down on these signals would fan the fire of inflammation and speed up the progression of atherosclerosis.

"Inflammation is a two-edged sword. If resolution fails and the response gets out of hand there is a never ending civil war in the body," said Dr. Aksam J. Merched, assistant professor of molecular and cellular biology at BCM and lead author of the study. "Continued inflammation draws more macrophages (potent immune system cells) to the site of the inflammation. They produce molecules that turn this into a vicious cycle."

Dr. Charles Serhan of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, a key collaborator who first discovered many of the chemical mediators, provided special expertise in understanding the role of the mediators as well as performed analyses that allowed us to measure them accurately, said Chan.

"Resolution is not a passive process," said Chan, who is also the Betty Rutherford Chair for Diabetes Research at BCM. "It is active and produces specific anti-inflammatory mediators that 'cool down' the inflammatory process.

Some natural mediators that 'cool' this inflammation are derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are plentiful in fish and are frequently cited for their beneficial effects on the heart. Another kind of mediator is triggered by the anti-inflammation drug aspirin, said Chan.

"The specific chemical mediators that naturally cool down the inflammatory process identified in this study represent a new drug target for anti-atherosclerosis therapy," said Merched.


'/>"/>

Contact: Dipali Pathak
pathak@@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Vitamin D: New way to treat heart failure?
2. Oocyte-specific gene mutations cause premature ovarian failure
3. Jefferson receives $11.6M NIH grant to study novel mechanisms of heart failure
4. Many African-Americans have a gene that prolongs life after heart failure
5. Genetic variant mimics effect of heart failure medications
6. Certain diseases, birth defects may be linked to failure of protein recycling system
7. High blood pressure, low energy -- a recipe for heart failure
8. Inflammation triggers cell fusions that could protect neurons, Stanford research shows
9. Bleeding, not inflammation, is major cause of early lung infection death
10. Growing use of nanomaterials spurs research to investigate possible downsides
11. Lipoic acid could reduce atherosclerosis, weight gain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/19/2017)... ALBANY, New York , April 19, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... highly competitive, as its vendor landscape is marked by ... in the market is however held by five major ... and Safran. Together these companies accounted for nearly 61% ... majority of the leading companies in the global military ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... , April 13, 2017 According to a ... Identity Authentication, Identity Analytics, Identity Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication Type, Deployment ... the IAM Market is expected to grow from USD 14.30 Billion in ... Rate (CAGR) of 17.3%. ... MarketsandMarkets Logo ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... , April 11, 2017 NXT-ID, ... security technology company, announces the appointment of independent Directors Mr. ... to its Board of Directors, furthering the company,s corporate ... ... NXT-ID, we look forward to their guidance and benefiting from ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2017)... ... April 27, 2017 , ... ... Borlaug CAST Communication Award goes to Jayson Lusk, a consummate communicator who promotes ... media to advocate for science, as he explains how innovation and growth in ...
(Date:4/26/2017)... Myrtle Beach, SC (PRWEB) , ... April 26, ... ... for the mind, has teamed up with NASA to showcase the future of ... NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft and includes a guest ...
(Date:4/26/2017)... ... April 26, 2017 , ... ... and North America this May on the following dates: , ... H. Taylor, Chairman of the Learning and Performance Institute will be the ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... April 25, 2017 , ... Franz ... Lisp (CL) development tools, and market leader for Semantic Graph Database ... now available within the most effective system for developing and deploying applications to ...
Breaking Biology Technology: