Navigation Links
Extinct ancient ape did not walk like a human, study shows
Date:7/25/2013

AUSTIN, Texas For decades, the movement of an ancient ape species called Oreopithecus bambolii has been a matter of debate for scientists. Did it walk like a human across its swampy Mediterranean island or did it move through the trees like other apes?

According to a new study, led by University of Texas at Austin anthropologists Gabrielle A. Russo and Liza Shapiro, the 9- to 7-million-year-old ape from Italy did not, in fact, walk habitually on two legs.

The findings refute a long body of evidence, suggesting that Oreopithecus had the capabilities for bipedal (moving on two legs) walking.

The study, published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Human Evolution, confirms that anatomical features related to habitual upright, two-legged walking remain exclusively associated with humans and their fossil ancestors.

"Our findings offer new insight into the Oreopithecus locomotor debate," says Russo, who is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at Northeast Ohio Medical University. "While it's certainly possible that Oreopithecus walked on two legs to some extent, as apes are known to employ short bouts of this activity, an increasing amount of anatomical evidence clearly demonstrates that it didn't do so habitually."

As part of the study, the researchers analyzed the fossil ape to see whether it possessed lower spine anatomy consistent with bipedal walking. They compared measurements of its lumbar vertebrae (lower back) and sacrum (a triangular bone at the base of the spine) to those of modern humans, fossil hominins (extinct bipedal human ancestors), and a sample of mammals that commonly move around in trees, including apes, sloths and an extinct lemur.

The lower spine serves as a good basis for testing the habitual bipedal locomotion hypothesis because human lumbar vertebrae and sacra exhibit distinct features that facilitate the transmission of body weight for habitual bipedalism, says Russo.

According to the findings, the anatomy of Oreopithecus lumbar vertebrae and sacrum is unlike that of humans, and more similar to apes, indicating that it is incompatible with the functional demands of walking upright as a human does.

"The lower spine of humans is highly specialized for habitual bipedalism, and is therefore a key region for assessing whether this uniquely human form of locomotion was present in Oreopithecus," says Shapiro, a professor of anthropology. "Previous debate on the locomotor behavior of Oreopithecus had focused on the anatomy of the limbs and pelvis, but no one had reassessed the controversial claim that its lower back was human-like."


'/>"/>

Contact: Gabrielle A. Russo
grusso@neomed.edu
330-325-6485
University of Texas at Austin
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Pollen can protect mahogany from extinction
2. Global effort launched to save turtles from extinction
3. First mass extinction linked to marine anoxia
4. University of Toronto biologists predict extinction for organisms with poor quality genes
5. 24 new species of lizards discovered on Caribbean islands are close to extinction
6. UGA study finds theres not always safety in numbers when it comes to extinction risk
7. One-quarter of grouper species being fished to extinction
8. 10 million years to recover from mass extinction
9. Woolly mammoth extinction has lessons for modern climate change
10. Top predators key to extinctions as planet warms
11. North American freshwater fishes race to extinction
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... April 28, 2016 First quarter 2016:   ... 966% compared with the first quarter of 2015 The ... 589.1 M (loss: 18.8) and the operating margin was 40% (-13) ... Cash flow from operations was SEK 249.9 M (21.2) ... guidance is unchanged, SEK 7,000-8,500 M. The operating margin ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... 15, 2016 Research and ... Biometrics Market 2016-2020,"  report to their offering.  , ... , ,The global gait biometrics market is expected ... the period 2016-2020. Gait analysis generates ... be used to compute factors that are not ...
(Date:3/29/2016)... , March 29, 2016 ... "Company") LegacyXChange "LEGX" and SelectaDNA/CSI Protect are pleased to ... ink used in a variety of writing instruments, ensuring ... of originally created collectibles from athletes on LegacyXChange will ... analysis of the DNA. Bill Bollander ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... investments in recruiting top industry experts, and expanding its LATAM network and logistics ... tools for clients to manage their clinical trial projects. , The expansion will ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... ... Cambridge Semantics, the leading provider of Smart Data analytic and data ... to The Silicon Review’s “20 Fastest Growing Big Data Companies of 2016.” , ... of end users facing some of the most complex data challenges in the industry,” ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... , ... The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to announce that Charles “Chuck” ... of Committee since 1987. Since then, he has served in a number of key ... for both the program and exposition committees. In his professional career, Dr. Gardner is ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... Columbia , April 27, 2016 ... "NanoStruck") (CSE: NSK) (OTCPink: NSKQB) ( Frankfurt ... Anschluss an ihre Pressemitteilung vom 13. August 2015 ... hat, ihre Finanzen um zusätzliche 200.000.000 Einheiten auf ... Kanadische Dollar zu bringen. Davon wurden 157.900.000 Einheiten ...
Breaking Biology Technology: