Navigation Links
Exposure to high pollution levels during pregnancy may increase risk of having child with autism
Date:6/17/2013

Boston, MA Women in the U.S. exposed to high levels of air pollution while pregnant were up to twice as likely to have a child with autism as women who lived in areas with low pollution, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). It is the first large national study to examine links between autism and air pollution across the U.S.

"Our findings raise concerns since, depending on the pollutant, 20% to 60% of the women in our study lived in areas where risk of autism was elevated," said lead author Andrea Roberts, research associate in the HSPH Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

The study appeared online June 18, 2013 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Exposure to diesel particulates, lead, manganese, mercury, methylene chloride and other pollutants are known to affect brain function and to affect the developing baby. Two previous studies found associations between exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and autism in children, but those studies looked at data in just three locations in the U.S.

The researchers examined data from Nurses' Health Study II, a long-term study based at Brigham and Women's Hospital involving 116,430 nurses that began in 1989. Among that group, the authors studied 325 women who had a child with autism and 22,000 women who had a child without the disorder. They looked at associations between autism and levels of pollutants at the time and place of birth. They used air pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to estimate women's exposure to pollutants while pregnant. They also adjusted for the influence of factors such as income, education, and smoking during pregnancy.

The results showed that women who lived in the 20% of locations with the highest levels of diesel particulates or mercury in the air were twice as likely to have a child with autism as those who lived in the 20% of areas with the lowest levels.

Other types of air pollutionlead, manganese, methylene chloride, and combined metal exposurewere associated with higher autism risk as well. Women who lived in the 20% of locations with the highest levels of these pollutants were about 50% more likely to have a child with autism than those who lived in the 20% of areas with the lowest concentrations.

Most pollutants were associated with autism more strongly in boys than girls. However, since there were few girls with autism in the study, the authors said this finding should be examined further.

Senior author Marc Weisskopf, associate professor of environmental and occupational epidemiology at HSPH, said, "Our results suggest that new studies should begin the process of measuring metals and other pollutants in the blood of pregnant women or newborn children to provide stronger evidence that specific pollutants increase risk of autism. A better understanding of this can help to develop interventions to reduce pregnant women's exposure to these pollutants."


'/>"/>

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Dads life stress exposure can affect offspring brain development, Penn Study finds
2. Fetal neuromaturation associated with mothers exposure to ddt and other environmental contaminants
3. Posttraumatic stress disorder treatment: Genetic predictor of response to exposure therapy
4. Early exposure to bisphenol A might damage the enamel of teeth
5. Long-term exposure to fine particles of traffic pollution increases risk of heart disease
6. Measuring mercury: Common test may overestimate exposure from dental amalgam fillings
7. New approaches for controlling pesticide exposure in children
8. Prenatal exposure to pesticide DDT linked to adult high blood pressure
9. Childhood blood lead levels rise and fall with exposure to airborne dust in urban areas
10. Fetal exposure to PVC plastic chemical linked to obesity in offspring
11. Small, portable sensors allow users to monitor exposure to pollution on their smart phones
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/22/2016)... , Jan. 22, 2016 ... the addition of the "Global Biometrics ... to their offering. --> ... the "Global Biometrics Market in Retail ... --> Research and Markets ...
(Date:1/18/2016)... , Jan. 18, 2016  Extenua Inc., ... that simplifies the use and access of ubiquitous ... go-to-market partnership with American Cyber.  ... extensive experience leading transformational C4ISR and Cyber initiatives ... integrating the latest proven technology solutions," said ...
(Date:1/11/2016)... , Jan. 11, 2016  higi, the ... nearly 10,000 retail locations, web and mobile, today ... $40 million from existing investors. ... be devoted to further innovate higi,s health platform ... and web portal – including expanding services and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... Sinovac Biotech Ltd. ("Sinovac" or the "Company") (NASDAQ: ... China , today announced that the ... February 4, 2016 a preliminary non-binding proposal letter, dated ... V-Ming ( Shanghai ) Investment Holdings Co., ... Shenzhen ) Fund Management Co., Ltd., Beijing ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... ... February 04, 2016 , ... Many of the engineers ... 10 years. What sets them apart from other cuvette manufacturers is their supercharged ... their website. On top of this steady flow of inside information, they have ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... Feb. 3, 2016  With the growing need ... that is underway, therapies such as monoclonal antibodies, ... whole host of indications are in high demand. ... the development and production of these therapeutics. However, ... and high costs, novel approaches and novel expression ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... BRUNSWICK, N.J. , Feb. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... grants totaling more than $1 million for researchers ... are working on health-related research that demonstrates exciting ... this round of funding for the New Jersey ... for faculty members at these educational institutions— Princeton ...
Breaking Biology Technology: