Navigation Links
Exposure to high pollution levels during pregnancy may increase risk of having child with autism
Date:6/17/2013

Boston, MA Women in the U.S. exposed to high levels of air pollution while pregnant were up to twice as likely to have a child with autism as women who lived in areas with low pollution, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). It is the first large national study to examine links between autism and air pollution across the U.S.

"Our findings raise concerns since, depending on the pollutant, 20% to 60% of the women in our study lived in areas where risk of autism was elevated," said lead author Andrea Roberts, research associate in the HSPH Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

The study appeared online June 18, 2013 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Exposure to diesel particulates, lead, manganese, mercury, methylene chloride and other pollutants are known to affect brain function and to affect the developing baby. Two previous studies found associations between exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and autism in children, but those studies looked at data in just three locations in the U.S.

The researchers examined data from Nurses' Health Study II, a long-term study based at Brigham and Women's Hospital involving 116,430 nurses that began in 1989. Among that group, the authors studied 325 women who had a child with autism and 22,000 women who had a child without the disorder. They looked at associations between autism and levels of pollutants at the time and place of birth. They used air pollution data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to estimate women's exposure to pollutants while pregnant. They also adjusted for the influence of factors such as income, education, and smoking during pregnancy.

The results showed that women who lived in the 20% of locations with the highest levels of diesel particulates or mercury in the air were twice as likely to have a child with autism as those who lived in the 20% of areas with the lowest levels.

Other types of air pollutionlead, manganese, methylene chloride, and combined metal exposurewere associated with higher autism risk as well. Women who lived in the 20% of locations with the highest levels of these pollutants were about 50% more likely to have a child with autism than those who lived in the 20% of areas with the lowest concentrations.

Most pollutants were associated with autism more strongly in boys than girls. However, since there were few girls with autism in the study, the authors said this finding should be examined further.

Senior author Marc Weisskopf, associate professor of environmental and occupational epidemiology at HSPH, said, "Our results suggest that new studies should begin the process of measuring metals and other pollutants in the blood of pregnant women or newborn children to provide stronger evidence that specific pollutants increase risk of autism. A better understanding of this can help to develop interventions to reduce pregnant women's exposure to these pollutants."


'/>"/>

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Dads life stress exposure can affect offspring brain development, Penn Study finds
2. Fetal neuromaturation associated with mothers exposure to ddt and other environmental contaminants
3. Posttraumatic stress disorder treatment: Genetic predictor of response to exposure therapy
4. Early exposure to bisphenol A might damage the enamel of teeth
5. Long-term exposure to fine particles of traffic pollution increases risk of heart disease
6. Measuring mercury: Common test may overestimate exposure from dental amalgam fillings
7. New approaches for controlling pesticide exposure in children
8. Prenatal exposure to pesticide DDT linked to adult high blood pressure
9. Childhood blood lead levels rise and fall with exposure to airborne dust in urban areas
10. Fetal exposure to PVC plastic chemical linked to obesity in offspring
11. Small, portable sensors allow users to monitor exposure to pollution on their smart phones
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/5/2017)... Allen Institute for Cell Science today announces the launch ... dynamic digital window into the human cell. The website ... deep learning to create predictive models of cell organization, ... suite of powerful tools. The Allen Cell Explorer will ... resources created and shared by the Allen Institute for ...
(Date:4/4/2017)... , April 4, 2017   EyeLock LLC ... announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office ... broadly covers the linking of an iris image with ... transaction) and represents the company,s 45 th issued ... patent is very timely given the multi-modal biometric capabilities ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... -- The research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic ... by adopting ground breaking 3D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, ... accuracy for use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of ... ... A research team led by Dr ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/20/2017)...  Kibow Biotech Inc., a pioneer in developing "Enteric ... a new patent covering a unique method for preventing ... and Trademark Office on May 23 rd 2017. ... Bio award in 2014 in San Diego, ... to chronic disease. Renadylâ„¢, the first and only dietary ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... ... Do More with OHAUS , With the launch of the new laboratory equipment ... to extending its expertise across the entire laboratory to a range of life science ... for its customers to 'Do More' in the lab. , Efficiency and Safety ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... June 19, 2017 , ... As Vice President, Product Services, ... training, implementation, support, and client process and SOP development. , Mr. Guinter brings ... leadership roles for service providers and top-tier pharmaceuticals, and as an independent consultant ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... of Prussia, PA (PRWEB) , ... June 19, 2017 , ... ... life sciences companies for over 50 years. One of the biggest challenges faced by ... Joining the firm’s regulatory affairs services team is Kati Abraham , who is ...
Breaking Biology Technology: